OUTDOOR RECREATION /NATURE BASED TOURISM     River Canyon Country
Kristin Dahl  Travel Oregon@ORTravelGreen
OUTCOMES• Familiarity with nature-based tourism industry• Understanding of nature-based tourism segments• An understanding...
OUTCOMES• Assets and opportunities identified for priority  segments in the areas of   – Infrastructure   – Business goods...
AGENDA - MORNINGOpening Remarks & Introductions• Warm-up asset mapping activity• Welcome and overview• Community Tourism V...
AGENDA - MORNINGUnderstanding our Local Assets• What could nature-based tourism look like  here?• Local panel• Understandi...
AGENDA - AFTERNOONStrategy Development• Nature-based tourists wants and needs (activity)• Identifying assets and opportuni...
COMMUNITY TOURISM VISION
River Canyon Country – Draft VisionRiver Canyon Country in 2030 is a region that is engaged toward a common future with a ...
River Canyon Country – Priorities1. Create a regional leadership structure for tourism    development2. Develop a regional...
River Canyon Country – Strategy Ideas• Educate front‐line staff about local recreation opportunities • Develop a regional ...
NATURE-BASED TOURISMTravel to fragile, pristine, and often protectedareas that strive to be low impact andoftentimes small...
SOUTHEAST ALASKA
SOUTHEAST ALASKAFACTORS OF SUCCESS• Defined, high volume market - reputation• Businesses (tour operators) offer every expe...
OURAY, COLORADO
OURAY, COLORADO
OURAY ICE PARK
OURAY ICE CLIMBING FESTIVAL
OURAY, COLORADOFACTORS OF SUCCESS• Identified one single natural asset• Creativity!• Vision and perseverance of volunteers...
FIORDLANDS NATIONAL PARK
FIORDLANDS NATIONAL PARKFACTORS OF SUCCESS Public sector built on the success of private  entrepreneurs; understand the v...
HOOD RIVER, OREGON
GORGE GAMES
HOOD RIVER, OREGONFACTORS OF SUCCESS• Capitalized on one natural asset – the wind!• Windsurfing pioneers fostered the buzz...
WHAT DOES NBT LOOK LIKE HERE?
LOCAL PANEL
Outdoor Recreation Product ImageOregon has a strong outdoor recreation story to tell                          Source: 2006...
Central Oregon Region vs. State Norm
Most Popular Visitor Activities                                      in Central Oregon (2008-09)                          ...
Central Oregon Region vs. State Norm
Central Oregon Region vs. State Norm
by the Outdoor IndustryAssociation
In 2011…Despite the uncertainty, more than 140 millionAmericans make outdoor recreation a priorityin their daily lives, pr...
NATIONAL REC ECONOMY                                                                 Over ¾ of Americans                  ...
$80 billion national state, and local       tax revenues each year“Cities and towns across the country are tapping  into t...
Today’s Outdoor Lovers Aren’t confined to traditional demographics or activity  segments. They seek meaningful outdoor e...
TOP OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES             BY PARTICIPATION RATE  Running, jogging & trail running                            ...
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIESBY FREQUENCY OF PARTICIPATION  Running, jogging & trail running    Road biking, mt biking & BMX     ...
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved)               Hiking    Camping (non‐R...
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATE                       Canoeing                    Backpackin...
TOP 5 BIGGEST % INCREASES          IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIESOver the past year                       Over the past 3 yearsRecr...
WHAT MOTIVATES AMERICANS         TO GET OUTSIDE?              Top 5 Primary Motivators              Get exercise          ...
OREGONIAN’S   ACTIVEOUTDOOR RECPARTICIPATION
OREGON’S REC ECONOMY  • Contributes more than $5.8 billion annually to    Oregon’s economy  • Supports 73,000 jobs across ...
REGIONAL TARGET MARKETS• Hikers / trail users / backcountry enthusiasts• River users!!! Anglers, whitewater  enthusiasts• ...
EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES• Outdoor rec events• Retreats / educational programs• Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP)
HIKING / TRAILS
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved)               Hiking    Camping (non‐R...
TRAIL RELATED RECREATION• 55.8 million participants (2006)• 26% of the U.S. population is participating• $30.2 BILLION in ...
Ochoco National Forest        Recreation Use (2008)Highest % of               Most often cited as Participation           ...
Ochoco Nat’l Forest / CR Nat’l Grasslands         Fee Income, 2010-11  2011                                               ...
FISHING
WILDLIFE WATCHING
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved)               Hiking    Camping (non‐R...
Fishing, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing, and        Shellfishing in Oregon      2008 Trip Characteristics and Expenditure Estim...
Total Participants by Activity               2,000,000                                                           1,700,000...
Fish & Wildlife Recreation Expenditures                                     Trav el-Generated                             ...
Travel-Generated Expenditures by Activity                                                                         Fishing ...
Travel-Generated Expenditures by Region            North Coast          Central Coast                 Central             ...
Travel-Generated Expenditures                    Top 10 Oregon Counties   Lincoln   ClatsopDeschutes Tillamook     LaneMul...
Oregon Counties                        Columbia              Clatsop              Clatsop                                S...
Type of Accommodation                                 Oregon ResidentsHotel, Motel, Cabin    Campground,      CampingFrien...
Fishing, Hunting, Shellfish and Wildlife Viewing                               Travel Companions     Just MyselfImmediate ...
More informationhttp://industry.traveloregon.com
PADDLESPORTS
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATE                       Canoeing                    Backpackin...
PADDLESPORTS: RAFTING• 1.3 percent of Americans participated in rafting in  2011• 43 percent of rafters make only one outi...
PADDLESPORTS: KAYAKING • Kayaking has enjoyed steady growth since 2006,   climbing to 4.1 percent of Americans in 2011 • R...
PADDLESPORTS: CANOEING• Canoeing is the most popular type of paddling• 3.4 percent of Americans participated in canoeing i...
ROCK CLIMBING
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATE                       Canoeing                    Backpackin...
CYCLINGwww.worldbiking.info
OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES                  BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved)               Hiking    Camping (non‐R...
CYCLISTS - NATIONALLY43 MILLION adult bicyclists                                                                  2.4     ...
CYCLISTS - NATIONALLY           U.S. Trip-related sales: $47 billion  Jobs generated by cycling: 1.1 millionThe Active Out...
Sketch by Russ Roca, The Path Less Pedaled, www.pathlesspedaled.com
EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES• Outdoor rec events• Retreats / educational programs• Stand Up Paddle boarding (SUP)
RETREATS / EVENTS
RETREATS / EVENTS
Fishtrap: Wallowa County
Signal Fire provides opportunitiesfor artists of all disciplines toengage in the natural world.
Over the Top Ride
For the Love of Mushrooms!     Oakridge, Oregon
STAND UP PADDLE BOARDING           (SUP)
STAND UP PADDLE BOARDING            (SUP) • As an emerging trend, 2010 was the first year the   SIMA Retail Distribution S...
ROAD CYCLISTS – WANTS AND NEEDSPhoto by Greg Lee
Facilities – Good ShouldersRoads good for bicycling• Low traffic• Good pavement• Wide shoulders
Facilities – Welcoming Signage
Facilities – Bike Specific                      Storage car for bikes on                      train (New Zealand)Canby Fer...
Facilities - RestroomsPublic restrooms
Facilities – WATER!
Facilities – Bike RacksBike-parking / bike racks
Business Goods & ServicesServices at appx 20-mile intervals
Business Goods & ServicesBike shop / Rental(s)
Business Goods & ServicesGuide and shuttle services
Business Goods & ServicesBike-friendly food (carbs and protein)• Quality – LOCALLY GROWN FOODS• Quantity• Home cooking!
Business Goods & ServicesBike-friendly beverages•BEER! Locally crafted brews•Locally grown wine
Business Goods & ServicesBike-friendly lodging
Business Goods & ServicesSouvenirs
Marketing & CommunicationsWebsites
Marketing & CommunicationsSocial Media
Marketing & CommunicationsCycling-specific maps
Cycle Tourist Wants & Needs       #1 - YOU!!!
Marketing & CommunicationsSocial Media
Marketing & CommunicationsCycling-specific maps
Cycle Tourist Wants & NeedsYOU!!!
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation
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RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation

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RCC - Outdoor Rec Nature-Based Workshop Presentation

  1. 1. OUTDOOR RECREATION /NATURE BASED TOURISM River Canyon Country
  2. 2. Kristin Dahl Travel Oregon@ORTravelGreen
  3. 3. OUTCOMES• Familiarity with nature-based tourism industry• Understanding of nature-based tourism segments• An understanding of the area’s natural assets best suited for nature-based tourism development• An understanding of the region’s vision and which segments will be targeted for development
  4. 4. OUTCOMES• Assets and opportunities identified for priority segments in the areas of – Infrastructure – Business goods and services, and – Marketing and communications• Strategies for development are identified and prioritized• Community has a clear direction on next steps and a process for moving forward
  5. 5. AGENDA - MORNINGOpening Remarks & Introductions• Warm-up asset mapping activity• Welcome and overview• Community Tourism Vision review• What IS nature-based tourism?
  6. 6. AGENDA - MORNINGUnderstanding our Local Assets• What could nature-based tourism look like here?• Local panel• Understanding market segments• Defining the region’s target market segments
  7. 7. AGENDA - AFTERNOONStrategy Development• Nature-based tourists wants and needs (activity)• Identifying assets and opportunities – Infrastructure – Business services – Marketing and communications• Charting a path for priority projects (walking!)• Funding resources for projects• Determine process / structure for enabling projects
  8. 8. COMMUNITY TOURISM VISION
  9. 9. River Canyon Country – Draft VisionRiver Canyon Country in 2030 is a region that is engaged toward a common future with a clear shared identity. The community has worked hard to build on values of quality education, health and creating an active lifestyle, and this has paid off in having a dynamic and high caliber workforce and strong social capital.  This is reflected in how our community organizations and volunteers work together in a coordinated and cohesive manner. This cohesion allows us to adapt and capitalize on new and emerging opportunities, while maintaining our strong community base. We value our people and invest in creating opportunities for them to work, contribute and thrive in the region. We have beautiful landscapes, parks, and natural vistas, which are now connected by a highly developed network of trails, by‐ways and transport systems. We have a strong economic tourism infrastructure focused on leveraging our unique regional assets of local food, outdoor recreation and cultural diversity and identity. Our thriving economy is built on our locally owned entrepreneurial businesses, and complemented by world‐class destinations. We are known worldwide for our authentic, family friendly and environmentally sustainable practices. We have become a renowned mecca for well managed outdoor and eco‐tourism and cultural experiences that make us the ‘must‐do’ destination for our many new and return visitors from across the world. 
  10. 10. River Canyon Country – Priorities1. Create a regional leadership structure for tourism  development2. Develop a regional marketing strategy3. Conduct local trainings to increase local knowledge of  tourism experiences (what there is to do!) 4. Ramp up local communication about tourism  development (improve internal communication systems)5. Develop infrastructure for recreation and transportation6. Develop packages and itineraries for visitors 7. Conduct an asset inventory and do a gap analysis8. Ramp up business development for tourism9. Create new and grow existing events 
  11. 11. River Canyon Country – Strategy Ideas• Educate front‐line staff about local recreation opportunities • Develop a regional bike plan – identify linkages for trails  between cities, mountain biking, where shoulders are needed• Grow a network of cycling routes throughout RCC• Create cycling routes with directional stencils• Coordinate lodging for like‐minded enthusiasts – for example,  for a group that wants to ride between three towns• Develop a porter service to support above• Create itineraries and packages for outdoor enthusiasts• Develop city tours for bikes (and busses)• Develop a web site to direct anyone to local recreation assets• Develop natural resource tours• Obtain recreation grants• Increase youth opportunities; promote nature experiences for  youth
  12. 12. NATURE-BASED TOURISMTravel to fragile, pristine, and often protectedareas that strive to be low impact andoftentimes small scale
  13. 13. SOUTHEAST ALASKA
  14. 14. SOUTHEAST ALASKAFACTORS OF SUCCESS• Defined, high volume market - reputation• Businesses (tour operators) offer every experience imaginable - access• GEAR is available to rent at every turn - access• Locals guide the visitor experience• Transportation options• Info available
  15. 15. OURAY, COLORADO
  16. 16. OURAY, COLORADO
  17. 17. OURAY ICE PARK
  18. 18. OURAY ICE CLIMBING FESTIVAL
  19. 19. OURAY, COLORADOFACTORS OF SUCCESS• Identified one single natural asset• Creativity!• Vision and perseverance of volunteers• Generated a buzz with a core group of enthusiasts• Clear opportunities on how to LEARN and how to EXPERIENCE the area• Developed a secondary asset in the off season
  20. 20. FIORDLANDS NATIONAL PARK
  21. 21. FIORDLANDS NATIONAL PARKFACTORS OF SUCCESS Public sector built on the success of private entrepreneurs; understand the value of recreation and tourism to the region Connections are made easy for visitors Infrastructure is robust Limit usage (through permitting) Well-maintained trails and huts make it accessible Towns in the entire region capitalize on interest in visiting/using the National Park No animals will eat you
  22. 22. HOOD RIVER, OREGON
  23. 23. GORGE GAMES
  24. 24. HOOD RIVER, OREGONFACTORS OF SUCCESS• Capitalized on one natural asset – the wind!• Windsurfing pioneers fostered the buzz which developed an international reputation• Local business developed (and relocated) due to the buzz• Plethora of local outdoor gear shops, gear rentals, and instructional opportunities• Developed assets for year-round recreation – mt biking, snow sports
  25. 25. WHAT DOES NBT LOOK LIKE HERE?
  26. 26. LOCAL PANEL
  27. 27. Outdoor Recreation Product ImageOregon has a strong outdoor recreation story to tell Source: 2006 Longwoods Overnight Visitor Profile
  28. 28. Central Oregon Region vs. State Norm
  29. 29. Most Popular Visitor Activities in Central Oregon (2008-09) Historic places Shopping Hiking/backpackingActivity or experience Cultural activities/attractions National/state park Region Camping State Eco‐tourism Winery tours/wine tasting Bicycling 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Percentage of trips that include this activity Source: Longwoods Research: Sample size 215 trips
  30. 30. Central Oregon Region vs. State Norm
  31. 31. Central Oregon Region vs. State Norm
  32. 32. by the Outdoor IndustryAssociation
  33. 33. In 2011…Despite the uncertainty, more than 140 millionAmericans make outdoor recreation a priorityin their daily lives, proving it with their wallets by putting $646 billion of their hard-earned dollars right back into the economy. Even better, this spending directly results in highly sought-after jobs for 6.1 million Americans. The Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Association, 2012
  34. 34. NATIONAL REC ECONOMY Over ¾ of Americans  participate in active  outdoor recreation  each yearThe Active Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2006
  35. 35. $80 billion national state, and local tax revenues each year“Cities and towns across the country are tapping into the business of outdoor recreation and with good reason. They recognize that outdoor recreation and open spaces are key ingredients to healthy communities, contribute to a high quality of life, and most importantly, attract and sustain businesses and families.” The Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Association, 2012
  36. 36. Today’s Outdoor Lovers Aren’t confined to traditional demographics or activity segments. They seek meaningful outdoor experiences in their backyards and in the backcountry. They are all genders, ages, shapes, sizes, ethnicities and income levels. They live throughout America, and they view outdoor recreation as an essential part of their daily lives. They fill their garages with bicycles, dirt bikes, backpacks, boats, skis, tents, hunting rifles and fishing gear. This is redefining the outdoor industry, an evolution that is evident in the growth of sales and jobs since 2006. The Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Association, 2012
  37. 37. TOP OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATE Running, jogging & trail running 51.5 millionFreshwater, saltwater & fly fishing 46.2 million Road biking, mt biking & BMX 43 million Car, backyard & RV camping 42.5 million Hiking 34.5 million 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  38. 38. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIESBY FREQUENCY OF PARTICIPATION Running, jogging & trail running Road biking, mt biking & BMX BirdwatchingFreshwater, saltwater & fly fishing Hiking 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 # of average outings / yearSource: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  39. 39. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved) Hiking Camping (non‐RV) Golf Wildlife viewing Hunting (all) Birdwatching Fishing ‐ fly 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 45.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  40. 40. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATE Canoeing BackpackingBicycling (mountain, non‐paved) Fishing ‐ freshwater Climbing (sport/traditional/ice) Trailrunning Rafting (whitewater) Kayaking (whitewater) Stand up paddling 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  41. 41. TOP 5 BIGGEST % INCREASES IN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIESOver the past year Over the past 3 yearsRecreational kayaking (27%) Freestyle skiing (59%)Bow hunting (19%) Downhill skiing (49%)Freestyle skiing (18%)  Snowshoeing (41%)Stand up paddling (18%) Recreational kayaking (32%)Downhill telemarking (15%)  Traditional/road triathlon (28%) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  42. 42. WHAT MOTIVATES AMERICANS TO GET OUTSIDE? Top 5 Primary Motivators Get exercise Be with family / friends Get away from the usual demands Keep physically fit Be close to natureSource: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  43. 43. OREGONIAN’S ACTIVEOUTDOOR RECPARTICIPATION
  44. 44. OREGON’S REC ECONOMY • Contributes more than $5.8 billion annually to Oregon’s economy • Supports 73,000 jobs across Oregon • Generates $310 million in annual state tax revenue • Produces $4.6 billion annual in retail sales and services, accounting for 3.4% of gross state productThe Active Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2006
  45. 45. REGIONAL TARGET MARKETS• Hikers / trail users / backcountry enthusiasts• River users!!! Anglers, whitewater enthusiasts• Wildlife watchers• Rock climbers• Road cyclists
  46. 46. EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES• Outdoor rec events• Retreats / educational programs• Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP)
  47. 47. HIKING / TRAILS
  48. 48. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved) Hiking Camping (non‐RV) Golf Wildlife viewing Hunting (all) Birdwatching Fishing ‐ fly 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 45.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  49. 49. TRAIL RELATED RECREATION• 55.8 million participants (2006)• 26% of the U.S. population is participating• $30.2 BILLION in trip related sales• 715, 661 jobs supported The Active Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2006
  50. 50. Ochoco National Forest Recreation Use (2008)Highest % of  Most often cited as Participation PRIMARY activityDay hiking / walking HuntingViewing wildlife Day hiking / walkingViewing natural features SnowmobilingRelaxing Viewing natural featuresDriving for pleasure Developed camping Source: National Forest Service
  51. 51. Ochoco Nat’l Forest / CR Nat’l Grasslands Fee Income, 2010-11 2011 Campground Collections Special Uses Collections Cold Springs Guard Station Ochoco Ranger Rental 2010*  $‐  $5,000  $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $30,000 $35,000 $40,000 $45,000 $50,000 * Walton Lake campground closed for reconstruction during 2010 Source: National Forest Service
  52. 52. FISHING
  53. 53. WILDLIFE WATCHING
  54. 54. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved) Hiking Camping (non‐RV) Golf Wildlife viewing Hunting (all) Birdwatching Fishing ‐ fly 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 45.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  55. 55. Fishing, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing, and Shellfishing in Oregon 2008 Trip Characteristics and Expenditure Estimates Photo Credit: ODFW
  56. 56. Total Participants by Activity 2,000,000 1,700,000 1,500,000Participants 1,000,000 631,000 500,000 282,000 175,000 Shellfish Hunting Fishing Wildlife Viewing
  57. 57. Fish & Wildlife Recreation Expenditures Trav el-Generated Expenditures Local 34.5% RecreationExpenditures 5.9% EquipmentExpenditures 59.6% Total: $2.5 billion
  58. 58. Travel-Generated Expenditures by Activity Fishing Wildlife $264.6 M Viewing $462.1 M Hunting Shellfish $104.5 M $31.0 M Travel-Generated Expenditures: $862,188,000Note: Wildlife viewing includes expenditures only on trips where wildlife viewing was a planned activity.
  59. 59. Travel-Generated Expenditures by Region North Coast Central Coast Central Eastern Southern Willamette ValleyPortland Metro/Columbia Wildlife Fishing South Coast Hunting Mt. Hood/Gorge Shellfish $0 $50 $100 $150 Millions
  60. 60. Travel-Generated Expenditures Top 10 Oregon Counties Lincoln ClatsopDeschutes Tillamook LaneMultnomah Douglas Fishing Wildlife Coos HuntingClackamas Shellfish Jackson $200 $400 $600 $800 $100 Millions
  61. 61. Oregon Counties Columbia Clatsop Clatsop Sherman Multnomah Hood Umatilla Umatilla Hood Wallowa Washington Washington Wallowa River River Morrow MorrowTillamook Union Union Yamhill Yamhill Clackamas Clackamas Gilliam Gilliam Wasco Wasco Polk Polk Marion Marion Jefferson Jefferson Wheeler Wheeler Baker BakerLincoln Benton Benton Linn Linn Grant Grant Crook Crook Lane Lane Deschutes Deschutes Malheur Malheur Coos Coos Douglas Douglas Harney Harney Lake Lake Jackson Jackson Josephine Josephine Klamath Klamath Curry Curry
  62. 62. Type of Accommodation Oregon ResidentsHotel, Motel, Cabin Campground, CampingFriends, Relatives Hunting Second Home Fishing Wildlife Shellfish 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Percent of trips
  63. 63. Fishing, Hunting, Shellfish and Wildlife Viewing Travel Companions Just MyselfImmediate FamilyMultiple Families Adult Friends Wildlife Hunting Fishing Other Shellfish 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Percent of Trips
  64. 64. More informationhttp://industry.traveloregon.com
  65. 65. PADDLESPORTS
  66. 66. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATE Canoeing BackpackingBicycling (mountain, non‐paved) Fishing ‐ freshwater Climbing (sport/traditional/ice) Trailrunning Rafting (whitewater) Kayaking (whitewater) Stand up paddling 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  67. 67. PADDLESPORTS: RAFTING• 1.3 percent of Americans participated in rafting in 2011• 43 percent of rafters make only one outing per year and 74 percent make three outings per year or less.• Overall participation in rafting remains relatively steady and is even increasing among adults ages 25 to 44.• However participation has declined among youth ages 6 to 17 over the past two years - following a nationwide trend among youth seen in other outdoor activities.A Special Report on Paddlesports, Outdoor Industry Association, 2009
  68. 68. PADDLESPORTS: KAYAKING • Kayaking has enjoyed steady growth since 2006, climbing to 4.1 percent of Americans in 2011 • Recreational kayaking is the most popular type of kayaking followed - by a significant margin - by sea/tour kayaking and whitewater kayaking • About 50% of kayakers get out 1 to 3 times per year. • Most kayakers live in states bordering the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean - the Middle Atlantic, South Atlantic and Pacific regionsA Special Report on Paddlesports, Outdoor Industry Association, 2009
  69. 69. PADDLESPORTS: CANOEING• Canoeing is the most popular type of paddling• 3.4 percent of Americans participated in canoeing in 2011• Canoeing participants make an average of 7 outings per year• Despite the activities greater popularity, canoers make fewer annual outings than kayakers - 77.4 million compared to 69.5 million• Geographically, most canoers are located in the East North Central and South Atlantic regions of the USA Special Report on Paddlesports, Outdoor Industry Association, 2009
  70. 70. ROCK CLIMBING
  71. 71. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATE Canoeing BackpackingBicycling (mountain, non‐paved) Fishing ‐ freshwater Climbing (sport/traditional/ice) Trailrunning Rafting (whitewater) Kayaking (whitewater) Stand up paddling 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  72. 72. CYCLINGwww.worldbiking.info
  73. 73. OUTDOOR REC ACTIVITIES BY PARTICIPATION RATEBicycling (road/paved) Hiking Camping (non‐RV) Golf Wildlife viewing Hunting (all) Birdwatching Fishing ‐ fly 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 45.0 Millions of people (Americans) Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  74. 74. CYCLISTS - NATIONALLY43 MILLION adult bicyclists 2.4 BILLION outings Source: Outdoor Recreation Participation Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2012
  75. 75. CYCLISTS - NATIONALLY U.S. Trip-related sales: $47 billion Jobs generated by cycling: 1.1 millionThe Active Outdoor Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2006
  76. 76. Sketch by Russ Roca, The Path Less Pedaled, www.pathlesspedaled.com
  77. 77. EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES• Outdoor rec events• Retreats / educational programs• Stand Up Paddle boarding (SUP)
  78. 78. RETREATS / EVENTS
  79. 79. RETREATS / EVENTS
  80. 80. Fishtrap: Wallowa County
  81. 81. Signal Fire provides opportunitiesfor artists of all disciplines toengage in the natural world.
  82. 82. Over the Top Ride
  83. 83. For the Love of Mushrooms! Oakridge, Oregon
  84. 84. STAND UP PADDLE BOARDING (SUP)
  85. 85. STAND UP PADDLE BOARDING (SUP) • As an emerging trend, 2010 was the first year the SIMA Retail Distribution Study has tracked the sales of SUPs. • SUPs accounted for 9% of total surfboard sales generating $14.5 million. The average SUP cost $1,105 making it the highest costing product in the study.Surf Industry Manufacturers Association, 2011
  86. 86. ROAD CYCLISTS – WANTS AND NEEDSPhoto by Greg Lee
  87. 87. Facilities – Good ShouldersRoads good for bicycling• Low traffic• Good pavement• Wide shoulders
  88. 88. Facilities – Welcoming Signage
  89. 89. Facilities – Bike Specific Storage car for bikes on train (New Zealand)Canby Ferry used bycyclists
  90. 90. Facilities - RestroomsPublic restrooms
  91. 91. Facilities – WATER!
  92. 92. Facilities – Bike RacksBike-parking / bike racks
  93. 93. Business Goods & ServicesServices at appx 20-mile intervals
  94. 94. Business Goods & ServicesBike shop / Rental(s)
  95. 95. Business Goods & ServicesGuide and shuttle services
  96. 96. Business Goods & ServicesBike-friendly food (carbs and protein)• Quality – LOCALLY GROWN FOODS• Quantity• Home cooking!
  97. 97. Business Goods & ServicesBike-friendly beverages•BEER! Locally crafted brews•Locally grown wine
  98. 98. Business Goods & ServicesBike-friendly lodging
  99. 99. Business Goods & ServicesSouvenirs
  100. 100. Marketing & CommunicationsWebsites
  101. 101. Marketing & CommunicationsSocial Media
  102. 102. Marketing & CommunicationsCycling-specific maps
  103. 103. Cycle Tourist Wants & Needs #1 - YOU!!!
  104. 104. Marketing & CommunicationsSocial Media
  105. 105. Marketing & CommunicationsCycling-specific maps
  106. 106. Cycle Tourist Wants & NeedsYOU!!!

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