Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Practical ways to help students develop a key competency
in social-emotional learning
Encouraging a Growth Mindset
© 2015 ...
2
Praise Effort Over Results
Praise effort and
process, not
results: “You did
great on that. You
must have worked
really h...
3
Praise Effort Over Results
Instead of
displaying only
finished student
work, post work
in progress or
drafts so
students...
4
Think of the Brain as Something That Grows
Work with your
students to create
posters or other
reminders that the
brain, ...
5
Encourage Students to Share Advice
Have students write tweets, blog posts, or letters giving advice to a
struggling stud...
6
Frame Mistakes as Part of the Learning Process
When introducing
new material or
setting a learning
goal, say something
l...
7
Specifically Reward Effort and Process
Create a
grading rubric
focusing on
effort or
process in
addition to
one focusing...
8
Communicate High Expectations
As part of written feedback to
students (especially those who are
underperforming), explic...
9
Equipping students with the mindsets, skills and habits they need to succeed
For more free resources on this topic,
down...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Encouraging A Growth Mindset

24,910 views

Published on

Teachers need practical and quick-to-implement strategies to encourage their students to develop a growth mindset. Students with a growth mindset believe that ability can change as a result of effort, perseverance, and practice (“Math is hard, but if I keep trying, I can get better at it.”). Students with a growth mindset see mistakes as ways to learn, embrace challenges, and persist in the face of setbacks.

Students with a fixed mindset believe that their own intelligence and talent are innate traits that don’t change (“I just can’t learn math.”). These students typically worry about not looking smart, get upset by mistakes, and give up sooner on tough tasks.

High-performing students and low-performing students may have either mindset. Whether or not students are aware of their mindset, a broad body of research has shown that what they believe about their own intelligence can affect their effort, engagement, motivation, and achievement as measured by test scores, school grades, passing rate in post-secondary education, and other metrics.

This presentation is one small piece of a growth mindset toolkit for educators (and parents) developed by Transforming Education. For more information, please visit: http://transformingeducation.org/growth-mindset-toolkit/

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Encouraging A Growth Mindset

  1. 1. Practical ways to help students develop a key competency in social-emotional learning Encouraging a Growth Mindset © 2015 by Transforming Education Equipping students with the mindsets, skills and habits they need to succeed
  2. 2. 2 Praise Effort Over Results Praise effort and process, not results: “You did great on that. You must have worked really hard.” Nurture a culture that tolerates risk: “We value taking on tough challenges more than we value easy success.”
  3. 3. 3 Praise Effort Over Results Instead of displaying only finished student work, post work in progress or drafts so students can see how work evolves with effort and feedback.
  4. 4. 4 Think of the Brain as Something That Grows Work with your students to create posters or other reminders that the brain, like a muscle, grows and gets stronger with effort.
  5. 5. 5 Encourage Students to Share Advice Have students write tweets, blog posts, or letters giving advice to a struggling student who doesn’t think he is smart enough to succeed.
  6. 6. 6 Frame Mistakes as Part of the Learning Process When introducing new material or setting a learning goal, say something like: “After you do this lesson, I’m going to ask each of you to share a mistake you made while doing your work, because mistakes can help us learn.”
  7. 7. 7 Specifically Reward Effort and Process Create a grading rubric focusing on effort or process in addition to one focusing on outcomes.
  8. 8. 8 Communicate High Expectations As part of written feedback to students (especially those who are underperforming), explicitly communicate high expectations: “I’m giving you these comments because I have high standards, and I know that you can meet them.”
  9. 9. 9 Equipping students with the mindsets, skills and habits they need to succeed For more free resources on this topic, download our Growth Mindset Toolkit at www.transformingeducation.org © 2015 by Transforming Education

×