Poi 1 art to joins 2 islands

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This article try to explain it´s origins in an ancient culture cradled in Polynesia, showing its transition to today, where the variations and conditions have become part of global electronic culture.

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Poi 1 art to joins 2 islands

  1. 1. Table of ContentsTo reader .....……………………………………………………………...1Maoríes……………………………………………………………………2Origin and function of Poi …………………………………………….4Variations of Poi ………………………………………………………...5Poi and benefits to the human body ………..………………………...7Some tools and materials to the Fire Poi …………………………….14Various tricks and techniques ..………………………………………15Care and precautions …………………………………………………..16 About us?……….................................................16Glossary………………………………………………………………….18Reference Bibliography ………………………………………………19Bibliography…………………………..………………………………..21Contacts of …………………………………….22
  2. 2. Dear readerWhat is Poi or FirePoi? It´s a question that many might be, so this article aims toexplain it´s origins in an ancient culture cradled in Polynesia, showing its transitionto today, where the variations and conditions have become part of global electronicculture.At the same time serves as an excuse to show how the members of the urban dancegroup TRANC3POI made a laborious task to perform and raise awareness of this artin Cuba where dont exist a legal institution, school or workshop to facilitate learningtheir different techniques and it´s dont recognized as a spectacle, though hundreds ofpeople are always fascinated on the ball of fire moving.We hope it´s of interest The authors.
  3. 3. I. MaoriNew Zealand, one end of the large area of Polynesia, was inhabited before the arrivalof Europeans, Maori people, according to tradition, settled there in successivemigrations started the tenth century and completed in the fourteenth from EasternPolynesia (Cook Islands, Society or even Hawaii).These people had to adapt it´s economy and social organization to newenvironmental conditions and isolated from the rest of the world created an originalculture. See Fig.1, 2 & 3Fig.1 Traditional Waka (canoe) at Waitangi, Bay of Islands, New Zealand.Photo courtesy of Te PuniKokiri. Fig.2 Maori Women Fig. 3 Maori WarriorThe word Maori means "person" in the Maori language, and in other Polynesianlanguages, Maoli in Hawaiian language means native, indigenous, genuine, real.
  4. 4. According to Maori mythology of the Maori ancestors originate from a mythical landcalled Hawaiki, which lies to the west, was the place where Polynesians migrated tothe islands. According to their legends, the Maori migrated from Hawaiki toAotearoa in seven boats and founded the seven original tribes. It was also said thatthe souls of the dead depart from Cape Renga, located at the northwest corner of theNorth Island to Hawaiki.For over 1000 years Maori have lived in the islands of New Zealand maintaining aclose relationship with the land. The culture of tupuna (ancestors) brought with themto Aotearoa, whose foundations later became the Maori culture, defined the way theyface the challenges of the new land and through their creative energies, methods andknowledge produced a distinctive art is now known as the Maori Arts (ToiMaori). Within the traditional arts are Toi Maori as whakairo (carved wood), kowhaiwhai(designs of beams), raranga (weaving), tukutuku (studs), Tamoko (tattoos), waiata(songs and chants), haka (dance), poi (dance with balls), taongapuoro (traditionalmusical instruments), Karanga (traditional call of welcome), whakakorero (oratory)and maurakau (the art of weaponry). It also refers to all forms of art thatcontemporary Maori artists are exploring such as writing, stage production,contemporary dance, film, visual arts, ceramics and sculpture. See Fig 4, 5, 6 & 7. Fig.4 Maori Art
  5. 5. Fig.5, 6 & 7 Maori TattoosII. Origen y función del PoiIn the Maori language, Poi is the word for ball. The traditional Maori Poi are madeup of natural elements like stones tied to ropes or weighted balls attached to flax,moss and other natural materials. See fig. 8, 9.10 &11. Fig. 8 Kiwi Fig.9 & 10 Poi made of natural materials Fig.11 Maori Women dancing with Poi
  6. 6. This art was at first had several roles, is said to have been used in ceremonies amongthe upper classes, women with a more artistic end, they used to win his men bysinging (the waiata-a-ringa) sensual rhythms and dance where the drums werepresent, men used it as a combat training, gaining skills, strength, agility andendurance.Over time some variation called rounders, which missiles were 3, 4 and even 8-ball,the most common use was to turn the ball over the head and then throw with greatforce and precision to decide whether they wanted a hit to neutralize or catch prey.In the melee that was used as a club to hit usually the opponents head. See Fig. 12 Fig.12 BoleadoraIII. Variations of PoiToday, Poi has spread to several areas of Asia, Europe, Latin America, Central andSouth with some variations specific by region.For practice and training, using various instruments made by the same practitioner,under the guidance of coach. See Fig.13
  7. 7. Fig.13 TRANC3POI member, practicing Light Poi, GlowsPoi, Glowstringing:This variation is used in low light indoors, using fluorescent lighting instrumentswith different variations. It is very popular in the nightclubs. See Fig.14Fig.14 Drawing instruments that make fluorescent lights (TRANC3POI)
  8. 8.  Modern Poi, Electronic Poi or Fire Poi: Variation is more complex, requires an optimal preparation because it uses the fire as an attraction. Manipulation of the instruments require great care to avoid accidents. Is closely related to electronic music, as is often the main inspiration of the dancer. See Fig.15 Fig.15 TRANC3POI in Action 7 Matraka in SoroaIV. Poi and benefits to the human bodyMovements when making Poi are complex yet fun, but it takes a bit of independenceand agility. Can be used by young and old, beginners and experts.The feeling when playing Poi is unique and once the technique is mastered, it fits inany discipline of dance, skating, acrobatics or martial arts, multiplying the visualeffects.The effect repetitive and circular in practice leads to a kind of meditation in motionwhose effects are beneficial for health, harmony of body and mind:  Increased self-esteem  Raise the self-  Develop muscle tone  Consolidate cardio-vascular health  Enhance body awareness  Increases resistance  Promotes inner peace  Develop creativity  Hone analytical skills  Promote positive attitude
  9. 9.  Cultivate patience and persistence  Reduce stress  Improved coordination  Balance bilateral motor skills  They help the motor development for children under 6 years of playing with one hand.  For ages 6 years and playing with both hands, favor the development of motor skills and coordination as well as flexibility and muscle tone.-Enhancing motor skillsThe movement of a specific body part such as hands, in a particular direction,required to operate a variety of muscle groups. Complex movements such as danceor martial arts, require hundreds of muscles work together and in coordinationsimultaneously.The ability to make us give motor skills, which evolve only with the use andrepetition.We tend naturally to be easier for certain movements than others, depending on theactivity we do daily. Motor skills can also develop in different degrees. The mostdeveloped are the reflex motor skills like walking, do not even need to think to do it.Although the development of motor skills is the desired goal of dancers, martialartists and athletes, such skills can become the biggest obstacles they are difficult tolearn. Our ability to develop motor skills increases our ability to isolate and topractice specific movements, and to perceive the difference between the movementwe want to do and we are really doing.This is how the mirrors are a great help to correct our mistakes in a self-taught. Thesimplest is a movement quickly our brains can create or develop appropriate motorskills. So when a trick does not want us to leave we dissect its simplest expression forbetter understanding and thus exercised by parties, including each arm separately,and only then the two together.The frequency of repetition, concentration and desire are important to learn thesemoves.
  10. 10. -Balancing the brainPoi literally amplifies the movements of our body allowing us to observe theaccuracy of the direction, timing, rhythm and strength. Its circular route can becreated by applying a force at some point in the journey (for example when the lowPoi) or by applying a force continues along the entire route of the circle. This meanswe can choose to work with some specific vectors or with the full range of vectors offorce in a given plane. Rigging plans and putting them in our hands, we can exploreour ability with all the force vectors through our field of movement (talking aboutthe entire area around our body).Help to develop bilateral synchrony as when both hands are in action that sendssignals to the brain affect both areas, left and right alike. Our hand is less adeptlearns to move in a fluid.The practice of synchronized and unsynchronized circles can help us tune our abilityto send the right signals to specific areas of our body.-Our body in motionWe tend to have more control in certain areas of our field of movement. The area infront of our bodies is generally the maximum ability, it is the area of our commonstock. In the area behind our heads and bodies are generally less bold, because werarely need to handle something behind us. Body movements require skill throughour field of movement and imbalance of skill (well developed in front, but poor back)can inhibit the perfection of the whole body movement.While developing skills through our field of movement, exploring the differentplanes and circles with Poi, whole body movements become ever more fluid, naturaland accurate, resulting in greater balance and coordination.To pace with Poi, dance to the music we like, it helps to dissociate the mind of ourmovement and flow freely, this allows us to further develop skills and discover newmoves that we did not think to do, thinking does not help much but to follow by ourbody.I joined the repetitive pleasurable, to the colors move and motivate us to find himselfthe technique, once perfected generates a state in which they naturally move ouranchorage daily activating positive energy, full of happiness, relaxation, peaceinterior, and deepen self-knowledge and our connection with everything.
  11. 11. V. Some tools and materials to the Fire PoiSquare chains with kevlar on top.You can find them with different shapes according to the taste and skill of thepractitioner. See Fig 16, 17.18, 19 & 20 Fig.16 Grip Chains Fig.17 18 Box Kevlar Fig. Grip Fig.19 Full Chains (used by TRANC3POI)
  12. 12. Fig. 20 TRANC3POI in the festival · Rotilla ¨ 2009 ¨FansThis instrument requires a lot of movement with the body. It is rarely used by men,women dominate the more by a sense of visual aesthetics when making aperformance.There are also many designs of these, and everything is geared to the dancerspreference. See Fig.21, 22 & 23 Fig.21 FansFig22. Fans mounted with their kevlars
  13. 13. Fig. 23 Fire Fans used by TRANC3POI in the Festival de Cine Pobre in Gibara, 2009.RopeThis instrument involves a complex implementation, it´s a rope on completely in fire.See Fig 24, 25 & 26 Fig. 24. Ropes Fig.25. Rope used by TRANC3POI
  14. 14. Fig.26 TRANC3POI in Action 7 of Matraka StaffFig.27 Folding StaffFire torch Fire Fingers Fig.28 Torch & Finger lit
  15. 15. Devil ClubsFig. 29 Devil & Clubs  Material used for the Fire Poi. What is Kevlar?The Kevlar ® or poliparafenilenotereftalamida is a polyamide synthesized. There areessentially two types of Kevlar: Kevlar 29 and Kevlar 49.The Kevlar fiber 29 is as a result of his making. It is typically used as reinforcementstrips for their good mechanical properties, or tissues. Among its applications is themanufacture of cables, resistant clothing (protective) or bulletproof vests.The Kevlar 49 is used when the fibers will be embedded in a resin to form acomposite material. Kevlar 49 fibers are surface treated to promote union with theresin. The Kevlar 49 is used as extreme sports equipment for speakers and for theaviation industry, aircraft and communications satellites and motorcycle helmets.See Fig.31Features  High tensile strength  Low elongation or structural rigidity  Low electrical conductivity  High chemical resistance  Low thermal shrinkage  High hardness  Excellent dimensional stability  High shear strength
  16. 16. Uses  Kevlar has played a significant role in many critical applications:  Strings, air bag landing system MarsPathfinder  Strings of small diameter  Sewing Thread  anti shrapnel shielding in jet aircraft engines, to protect passengers in case of explosion  running underinflated tires  Gloves from cuts, scrapes and other injuries  Kayaks with impact resistance without added weight  skis, helmets and racquets strong but lightweight  Bulletproof Vest  Kensington Notebook Locks  coating for optical fiber  Composed of CD / DVD by rotation shear strength  Exhaust silencers  Motor Construction  Helmets Formula 1  Flammable Extreme Poi, jugglers popular subject  Sailboats highly competitive race  High mountain boots  Acoustic boxes (Bowers & Wilkins)Fig. 31 KevlarVI. Various tricks and techniquesThere are several tricks and techniques, the attractiveness of these is the movement ofPoi beautiful drawing figures, where the expression, coordination and liaison with atrick with the other foster a pleasant spectacle.
  17. 17.  They can go from simple to complex, their names vary depending on the origin of the dancers. Then the names of some operations with their names as they are known in Cuba:  The Swirl  Butterfly  The propeller  The salutation of the Sun  Knight  Flowers  Wibble  The Mexican WaveVII. Care and precautionsAll care taken little, is important to always maintain an optimal precaution to avoidaccidents. Even with certainty when the practitioner insurance dominates their everymove there is no danger either for himself or for viewers.If possible, always have a portable extinguisher handy, and in the absence of a clothor fabric (cotton) large, wet close to the practitioners.- Make sure to always use the necessary and appropriate clothing (say, type of fabric)to perform tricks.- Always make sure before starting any trick that the instruments are in goodcondition for use.- Use only in instruments specified material (Kevlar).- Be careful when selecting the fuel with which to load the instruments, whether oil(most appropriate), liquid paraffin (no smell) or kerosene.- There should never be used nasta, gasoline or alcohol, which are highly volatile.VIII. About usTRANC3POI project born in Havana in September 2006 due to the rise of electronicmusic in Cuba in recent years as the realization of international Poi is closely tied tothis genre.
  18. 18. This project belongs to the Asociación Hermanos Saiz (AHS), in the Arts event, but isconsidered an urban art, as it has a mode within the dance itself, since there is noinstitution in our country legally, school workshop where you can learn.However the three artists in this group have found over time how to insert theirwork in other musical styles and artistic creation.Due to the interesting and seductive nature of this proposal TRANC3POI has beeninvited to numerous events and festivals worth mentioning among them theInternational Festival of Poor Cinema in Gibara, the Electronic Music Festival"Rotilla" (participating in almost all editions) in cultural activities of the Embassy ofSpain in Cuba, in the convection of Tourism in the Cayman Rock, activities by theend of summer organized by the National Laboratory of Electroacoustic Music(LNME), the Proposiciones Festivals (PM Record), in the 6 Festival Urbans Theatre inMatanzas, and more recently at the Awards Gala Cuerda Viva 2011. Consists of:Carlos (El Puro) M. Hernández Rodríguez, Joyce Alvarez Courouneaux y ErnestoReyes Estévez. See Pág. 24.If you have had the concern to improve the way they move and navigate through theeveryday world, or learn a physical skill that you have fun, keep fit, give physicaland physical agility, flexibility, good reflexes, or just want to learn somethingdifferent and daring, The Poi is perhaps the tool for you.
  19. 19. GlossarySome Maori words with their translation Maoríes Words Means poi Bola taura Poi de mano poikokau Poi corto poiwaeroa Poi largo poitakarahi Un Poi corto poitakirua Dos Poi cortos tanikopoi Poi con tejido exterior raupopoi Poi hechos de plantas de Junco hakapoi Danza con Poi poiawhiowhio Movimiento circular del Poi poipiu Poi hechos con cuerdas de lino poirakau Batones de madera como Poi poitetere Poi y tambores poiwaka Poi y canoa kapahaka Grupo de Danza
  20. 20. REFERENCE BIBLIOGRAPHYAustralian Bureau of Statistics (2004).Australians Ancestries: 2001. Canberra:Australian Bureau of Statistics, Catalogue Number 2054.0.Biggs, Bruce (1994). "Does Maori have a closest relative?" in Sutton (ed.) 1994, pp. 96–105.Hiroa, TeRangi (Sir Peter Buck) (1974).The Coming of theMaori.Segundaedição.Primeiraedição, 1949. Wellington: Whitcombe and Tombs.Huata, Ngāmoni (2000), Te Rita Papesch, ed., The rhythm and life of poi, Auckland:HarperCollins, ISBN 1-86950-273-6, pg 12Irwin, Geoffrey (1992). The Prehistoric Exploration and Colonisation of thePacific.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Paringatai, Karyn (2004). Poiamaitaku poi: Unearthing the knowledge of thepast.Masters thesis, University of Otago.Shennan, Jennifer & McLean, Mervyn (September 1979). Remarks on Youngermans"Maori Dancing since the Eighteenth Century". Ethnomusicology 23 (3), pp. 493–499.Simmons, D.R. (1997). Ta Moko, The Art of Maori Tattoo. Edición revisada; primeraedición, 1986. Auckland: Reed.Statistics Canada (2003).Ethnic Origin (232), Sex (3) and Single and MultipleResponses (3) for Population, for Canada, Provinces, Territories, CensusMetropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2001 Census — 20% SampleData.Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Cat. No. 97F0010XCB2001001.Statistics New Zealand (2005).Estimated resident population of Māori ethnic group,at 30 June 1991–2005, selected age groups by sex. Wellington: Statistics New Zealand.Sutton, Douglas G. (Ed.) (1994). The Origins of the First New Zealanders.Auckland:Auckland University Press.United States Census Bureau (2003).Census 2000 Foreign-Born Profiles (STP-159):Country of Birth: New Zealand. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Census Bureau.Walrond, Carl (2005). Māori overseas, TeAra — the Encyclopedia of New Zealand.Youngerman, Suzanne (January 1974). Maori Dancing since the EighteenthCentury.Ethnomusicology 18 (1), pp. 75–100.
  21. 21. BIBLIOGRAPHYAustralian Bureau of Statistics (2004).Australians Ancestries: 2001. Canberra:Australian Bureau of Statistics, Catalogue Number 2054.0.Biggs, Bruce (1994). "Does Maori have a closest relative?" in Sutton (ed.) 1994, pp. 96–105.Hiroa, TeRangi (Sir Peter Buck) (1974).The Coming of theMaori.Segundaedição.Primeiraedição, 1949. Wellington: Whitcombe and Tombs.Huata, Ngāmoni (2000), Te Rita Papesch, ed., The rhythm and life of poi, Auckland:HarperCollins, ISBN 1-86950-273-6, pg 12Irwin, Geoffrey (1992). The Prehistoric Exploration and Colonisation of thePacific.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Paringatai, Karyn (2004). Poiamaitaku poi: Unearthing the knowledge of thepast.Masters thesis, University of Otago.Shennan, Jennifer & McLean, Mervyn (September 1979). Remarks on Youngermans"Maori Dancing since the Eighteenth Century". Ethnomusicology 23 (3), pp. 493–499.Simmons, D.R. (1997). Ta Moko, The Art of Maori Tattoo. Edición revisada; primeraedición, 1986. Auckland: Reed.Statistics Canada (2003).Ethnic Origin (232), Sex (3) and Single and MultipleResponses (3) for Population, for Canada, Provinces, Territories, CensusMetropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2001 Census — 20% SampleData.Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Cat. No. 97F0010XCB2001001.Statistics New Zealand (2005).Estimated resident population of Māori ethnic group,at 30 June 1991–2005, selected age groups by sex. Wellington: Statistics New Zealand.Sutton, Douglas G. (Ed.) (1994). The Origins of the First New Zealanders.Auckland:Auckland University Press.United States Census Bureau (2003).Census 2000 Foreign-Born Profiles (STP-159):Country of Birth: New Zealand. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Census Bureau.Walrond, Carl (2005). Māori overseas, TeAra — the Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
  22. 22. Youngerman, Suzanne (January 1974). Maori Dancing since the EighteenthCentury.Ethnomusicology 18 (1), pp. 75–100.http://enciclopediaespana.com/Poi_%28el_hacer_juegos_malabares%29.htmlhttp://www.thefiregarden.com/notes/The_History_of_Poihttp://www.homeofpoi.com/articles/FireSafety.phphttp://www.homeofpoi.com/ubbthreads/linkto/-Cling-Film-Sarin-Wrap-to-all-you-Yanks-/863270/ Homeofpoi.com discussion on the use of clingfilm to protectburnshttp://www.taringa.net/posts/imagenes/784181/Maor%C3%ADes,-un-pueblo-guerrero___-%28info,-pics-+-vid%29.htmlhttp://www.taringa.net/posts/arte/4307418/Historia-del-Poi-y-Video-Tutorial-The-Scales-of-Poi.html
  23. 23. Somos:  Carlos (El Puro) M. Hernández Rodríguez Correo: purogandalf@gmail.com Teléf.: 537 8377953 Móvil: 535 2369243  Joyce Alvarez Courouneaux Correo: legolasjoy@gmail.com Telef: 537 8739159 Móvil: 535 3390769  Ernesto Reyes Estevez Correo: erepoi@gmail.com Telef: 537 6485745 Móvil: 535 3235459You can find us at:http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/Tranc3poihttp://twitter.com/Tranc3poi?utm_campaign=newfollow20100823&utm_content=profile&utm_medium=email&utm_source=followwww.pablomilanesrecords.com/tranc3poiwww.festivalpropocisiones.com/tranc3poiwww.rotillafestival.com/es/tranc3poiwww.afrocubanevans.com/elpurodelpoiArticles of reference ofhttp://portalescenico.mx/content/matanzas-todo-teatrocubahttp://www.granma.cubaweb.cu/2011/03/21/cultura/artic02.htmlhttp://www.radio26.icrt.cu/index.php/culturales/89-de-matanzas/5017-sexto-festival-de-teatro-callejero-en-matanzas.html

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