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Setting a bold vision for biking in St. LouisAnn Mack, CEO, Trailnet
A bold future forSt. Louis• All modes and all ages are  welcome on ALL streets• Separate bicycle maps are  redundant• Tran...
Biking in St. Louistomorrow• People on foot, on bike, and in  cars animate the streets• Choosing to bike, walk, or take  t...
Biking in St. Louistoday• 13.8 miles of bicycle lanes• 22.0 miles shared-use paths• 74.2 miles of signed routes
Gateway Bike Plan• On-street and off-street  infrastructure• Education: BikeSmart classes  and St. Louis’ first LCI traini...
Achieving thevision• Political will and cooperation• The will and vision to change  business as usual
• Portland’s 300 mile bicycle                                                              network: $60 millionFigure 13. ...
Showing ourdecision makersthat bicyclingmatters•   Retaining and attracting residents•   Local trips means local profits• ...
Retaining andattracting the nextgeneration• 43.4% of our residents are  under 30• 64% of Millennials are now  choosing whe...
•   People arriving by bike spend onLocal trips mean        average $14.63/ month MORE at local                        bar...
Make it easy - andsafe - to park yourbike
Low costtransportationoptions forresidents• Transportation is the second  largest household expense in  the US• The cost o...
Raising the valueof neighborhoods• Bicycle boulevards have  increased property values• Traffic calming and road diets  can...
Removing thebarriers todevelopment• Reduced need for car parking  lowers development costs• High parking requirements  rai...
Annual Employee Healthcare Costs                                            $1,600.00                                     ...
Infrastructure andmaintenance thatfits the budget• Grand Bridge: $22 million• Example bicycle and  pedestrian bridge: $3.5...
St. Louis’Advantages• Non-traditional:   • Underutilized right-of-way   • Traffic closures   • Learning from others’ mista...
Sitting on agoldmine of rightof way• Only 25% of our lane miles  experience congestion• 56th in the nation for traffic  de...
Street closures• Traffic-calmed streets• Accessible by people on foot• Ramps can open up the streets  to people on bicycles
We can capitalizeon others’mistakes• Opportunity to learn from others’  hindsight: separated bike lanes  reduce crashes by...
Light rail• 10th in the nation for ridership• Bicycle accessible• Key link for a multi-modal  system
Good bones• Dense, well-defined  neighborhoods• Exceptional architecture• Numerous, historic parks
Early success• Bike/walk friendly neighborhoods  are revitalizing in the region• From 2000 to 2010, 6 out of the  7 neighb...
Des Moines:   5% bicycle modeshare by 2020Portland:     25% by 2030Denver:       10% modeshare by 2018NYC:          Triple...
2000        2010                                                                    Bicycle     Bicycle    Percent        ...
Kansas City:Platinum-levelbicycle friendly by2020• Mayor Funkhouser set goal after  Kansas City was declared the  worst bi...
Long Beach: To bethe best bicyclingcity in America•   Strong support from City Council    Members and the Mayor•   Innovat...
Chicago: To be themost bicycle-friendly big city inthe US• Mayor Emanuel campaigned as  a strong bicycle supporter• Rapid ...
•   Specific, phased implementation goals    Goal setting for   •   Requires mechanisms for measuring                     ...
•   How can we make this work for our Realizing   •                 region?                 What resources do we have in t...
Challenge•   What are the goals for YOUR    municipality?•   Track the data necessary to    achieve the goals•   Use the g...
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Setting a bold vision for biking in St. Louis

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Setting a bold vision for biking in St. Louis

  1. 1. Setting a bold vision for biking in St. LouisAnn Mack, CEO, Trailnet
  2. 2. A bold future forSt. Louis• All modes and all ages are welcome on ALL streets• Separate bicycle maps are redundant• Transit, bicycling, and walking are the most pleasant and efficient ways of traveling
  3. 3. Biking in St. Louistomorrow• People on foot, on bike, and in cars animate the streets• Choosing to bike, walk, or take transit is as common and convenient as driving
  4. 4. Biking in St. Louistoday• 13.8 miles of bicycle lanes• 22.0 miles shared-use paths• 74.2 miles of signed routes
  5. 5. Gateway Bike Plan• On-street and off-street infrastructure• Education: BikeSmart classes and St. Louis’ first LCI training• First region-wide Bike/Walk counts completed in September 2012
  6. 6. Achieving thevision• Political will and cooperation• The will and vision to change business as usual
  7. 7. • Portland’s 300 mile bicycle network: $60 millionFigure 13. Cumulative regional capitol expenditures in transportation 1995-2010 Cost • One mile of freeway: $60 million
  8. 8. Showing ourdecision makersthat bicyclingmatters• Retaining and attracting residents• Local trips means local profits• Saving money for low-income residents• Raising the value of neighborhoods• Lowering the barriers to development• Decreased health care costs• Infrastructure and maintenance that fits the budget
  9. 9. Retaining andattracting the nextgeneration• 43.4% of our residents are under 30• 64% of Millennials are now choosing where they want to live before finding a job• 77% plan to live in urban areas
  10. 10. • People arriving by bike spend onLocal trips mean average $14.63/ month MORE at local bars, convenience stores, and local profits • restaurants Biking and walking encourage shorter, local trips
  11. 11. Make it easy - andsafe - to park yourbike
  12. 12. Low costtransportationoptions forresidents• Transportation is the second largest household expense in the US• The cost of car ownership is approximately $8,946 per year• Cities have more tools to change transportation than housing or healthcare costs
  13. 13. Raising the valueof neighborhoods• Bicycle boulevards have increased property values• Traffic calming and road diets can increase property values and encourage retail uses• Wide sidewalks let cafes expand their sales, while making the neighborhood more pleasant
  14. 14. Removing thebarriers todevelopment• Reduced need for car parking lowers development costs• High parking requirements raise rents for residents and businesses• U-rack: $300 for equipment and installation, holds 2 bikes• One car parking space: $2,500 to over $40,000
  15. 15. Annual Employee Healthcare Costs $1,600.00 $1,400.00Decreased healthcare costs and $1,200.00better quality of $1,000.00life $800.00• The Aerobic Center Longitudinal Study found low fitness was the strongest predictor of death- $600.00 stronger than high blood pressure, obesity, or smoking• The Nurse’s Study found woman $400.00 who increased their daily activity to one hour per week reduced their risk of heart disease by 50% $200.00 $- Regular exercise No exercise
  16. 16. Infrastructure andmaintenance thatfits the budget• Grand Bridge: $22 million• Example bicycle and pedestrian bridge: $3.5 million• Road maintenance: • 5.6 cents per motor vehicle mile • .2 cents per bicycle mile
  17. 17. St. Louis’Advantages• Non-traditional: • Underutilized right-of-way • Traffic closures • Learning from others’ mistakes• Traditional: • Transit • Good bones • Demonstrated success
  18. 18. Sitting on agoldmine of rightof way• Only 25% of our lane miles experience congestion• 56th in the nation for traffic delay• Traffic congestion has dropped steadily over the last decade• Vehicles Mile Traveled are falling
  19. 19. Street closures• Traffic-calmed streets• Accessible by people on foot• Ramps can open up the streets to people on bicycles
  20. 20. We can capitalizeon others’mistakes• Opportunity to learn from others’ hindsight: separated bike lanes reduce crashes by 90%• Avoid wasteful spending on unpopular infrastructure• People of all abilities show a preference for separated bike lanes and low-traffic bicycle routes
  21. 21. Light rail• 10th in the nation for ridership• Bicycle accessible• Key link for a multi-modal system
  22. 22. Good bones• Dense, well-defined neighborhoods• Exceptional architecture• Numerous, historic parks
  23. 23. Early success• Bike/walk friendly neighborhoods are revitalizing in the region• From 2000 to 2010, 6 out of the 7 neighborhoods with light rail access in St. Louis gained residents• Of the neighborhood-level gains in the city, 87% were in “Very Walkable”
  24. 24. Des Moines: 5% bicycle modeshare by 2020Portland: 25% by 2030Denver: 10% modeshare by 2018NYC: Triple bicycle modeshare from 2007 to 2017Seattle: Triple bicycle modeshare from 2007 to 2017Kansas City: Platinum-level Bicycle Friendly City by 2020Long Beach: To become the best bicycling city in AmericaChicago: To become the most bike-friendly big city in the US • Specific and ambitious Goal setting for • Rallying cry for officials, city staff, and activists publicity and support
  25. 25. 2000 2010 Bicycle Bicycle Percent Commute Commute change, City Modeshare Modeshare 2000 to 2010 Cleveland, OH 0.2% 0.8% 279.62% Pittsburgh, PA 0.4% 1.6% 269.15% Portland, OR 1.8% 6.0% 237.77% Nashville-Davidson metro, TN 0.1% 0.4% 213.59% Anchorage, AK 0.5% 1.5% 196.49%Changes can have Atlanta, GA 0.3% 0.9% 179.54% Washington, DC 1.2% 3.1% 169.07%large impacts Kansas City, MO St. Louis, MO 0.1% 0.3% 0.3% 0.9% 167.94% 166.13% Wichita, KS 0.2% 0.5% 161.39% Chicago, IL 0.5% 1.3% 158.63%• St. Louis more than doubled Indianapolis, IN 0.2% 0.5% 152.98% our modeshare from 2000 to Virginia Beach, VA 0.3% 0.8% 149.25% Aurora, CO 0.2% 0.4% 134.35% 2010 Denver, CO 1.0% 2.2% 130.93%• New York City more than Oklahoma City, OK 0.1% 0.3% 120.88% Baltimore, MD 0.3% 0.7% 110.86% doubled their modeshare for all Philadelphia, PA 0.9% 1.8% 108.88% trips from 2007 to 2011 Detroit, MI 0.2% 0.3% 108.52% Milwaukee, WI 0.3% 0.7% 107.09% Tampa, FL 0.9% 1.9% 106.90% Corpus Christi, TX 0.2% 0.5% 103.44%
  26. 26. Kansas City:Platinum-levelbicycle friendly by2020• Mayor Funkhouser set goal after Kansas City was declared the worst bicycling city in America• Bronze level city with growing bike network• Bike/ped coordinator at the City• Bicycle routes adopted into Major Streets Plan
  27. 27. Long Beach: To bethe best bicyclingcity in America• Strong support from City Council Members and the Mayor• Innovative infrastructure despite strong car culture• Bicycle Supportive Business Districts• Effective rebranding effort for the city• Bike/ped coordinator on staff; planning and engineering staff also incorporate bicycle transportation work
  28. 28. Chicago: To be themost bicycle-friendly big city inthe US• Mayor Emanuel campaigned as a strong bicycle supporter• Rapid expansion of the on-street network, including cycle tracks• Currently developing a Streets for Cycling 2020 Plan, including benchmarks and goals• Bicycle department with 10 full time staff and six interns
  29. 29. • Specific, phased implementation goals Goal setting for • Requires mechanisms for measuring progress •planning and policy • Evaluation tool for success Holds staff and officials accountable
  30. 30. • How can we make this work for our Realizing • region? What resources do we have in thisthe vision room to transform our region?
  31. 31. Challenge• What are the goals for YOUR municipality?• Track the data necessary to achieve the goals• Use the goal and the process as a way to get an edge

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