Participatory Budgeting in New York City

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  • Participatory Budgeting in New York City

    1. 1. Participatory BudgetingIn New York City Council Member Brad Lander New York City, 39th District Livable St. Louis Conference October 26, 2012
    2. 2. BEFORE CITY COUNCIL
    3. 3. BRINGING ENGAGEMENT INTO OFFICE Supporting community organizing E-communications & social networking Interactive online tools NYC City Council Progressive Caucus
    4. 4. PARTICIPATORY BUDGETINGCommunity members directly determine how to spend part ofa public budget. • Decision-making (not consultation) • Ongoing process, not one-time contest • Inclusive and deliberativeFirst launched in Porto Allegre, Brazil in 1989.Now in 3,000+cities around theworld … but onlyjust reaching theUnited States.
    5. 5. ParticipatoryBudgetingIn New York City
    6. 6. Neighborhood Assemblies (Oct-Nov) identify community needs, brainstorm proposals DelegateImplementation Leadership Meetings & Monitoring development, (Nov-Feb) of projects research & research & develop evaluation proposals Community Present ideas to Vote the community (March) (Feb)
    7. 7. Neighborhood Assemblies
    8. 8. Neighborhood Assemblies
    9. 9. Neighborhood Assemblies
    10. 10. Budget Delegates
    11. 11. Budget Delegates
    12. 12. District 39, Year 1:864 Project Ideas 219 Eligible Projects 20 Proposals on Ballot 7 Received Funding
    13. 13. Voting
    14. 14. Voting
    15. 15. Voting
    16. 16. Voting
    17. 17. WINNING PROJECTS
    18. 18. “REVOLUTIONARY CIVICS IN ACTION”• Over 6,000 voters, 250+ budget delegates• Many newly active or disenfranchised • 33% of neighborhood assembly participants & budget delegates said they had never before worked with others in their community to solve a problems • 61% think our democracy needs a lot of changes (vs. 33% of general population). • Racially, ethnically & economically diverse
    19. 19. CHALLENGES & QUESTIONS• Extremely time-intensive• Outreach to diverse populations is challenging• Legislative districts are not communities• Very little money• Challenging to link to • broader budget issues • other frames for community planning • equity framework• Relationship between elected officials, neighborhood leaders, supporting organizations is complex
    20. 20. “REVOLUTIONARY CIVICS IN ACTION”• Deep participation• Renewed sense of trust in government• Deep sense of stewardship of public realm• Seen as both inclusive & efficient• Pushed within & across City agencies• Opened a dialogue on neighborhood planning• Developed new leaders• Doubled from 4 to 8 City Council members for FY2013 … and hopefully beyond
    21. 21. Participatory BudgetingIn New York City Council Member Brad Lander New York City, 39th District Livable St. Louis Conference October 26, 2012

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