Research Methods and Tools @Heterick Memorial Library<br />Traci Welch Moritz<br />Public Services Librarian/Assistant Pro...
Remember to consult research guide<br />2<br />
Annotated Bibliography<br />Allows you to see what is out there<br />Helps you narrow your topic and discard any irrelevan...
           Let’s Get Started<br />Research ethics<br />Writing well<br />Defining research topic<br />Tools for research<b...
Research Ethics<br /> ACADEMIC INTEGRITY <br />
Research Ethics<br />Copyright- intended to promote the arts and the sciences. It does this by providing authors of origin...
Research Ethics<br />Plagiarism - “...the wrongful appropriation or purloining, and publication as one’s own, the ideas or...
Research Ethics<br />In other words, to plagiarize is to copy someone else’s work without giving him/her credit.<br />Plag...
Research Ethics<br />2<br />How may I avoid plagiarizing?<br />Identify any information that would not be considered commo...
RefWorks<br />                REFWORKS<br />
Research Ethics<br />Things that are found in a number of places, and are likely to be known by a large number of people.<...
Research Ethics<br />What does paraphrase mean?<br />Main Entry: 1para·phrase  1 : a restatement of a text, passage, or wo...
Research Ethics<br />4<br />What does it mean to put something in my own words?<br />When you paraphrase something, it is ...
Research Ethics<br />What is a quote?<br />Main Entry: 1quote  1 a : to speak or write (a passage) from another usually wi...
How to do RESEARCH<br />
How to do research<br />Talk to your instructors; they are here to help you!<br />Visit the librarians; we are here to hel...
How to do research<br />Seven Steps of the Research Process<br />Amended with permission by the Librarians at the Olin and...
Research Strategy<br />
19<br />How to do research<br />STEP 1: IDENTIFY AND DEVELOP YOUR TOPIC<br /><ul><li>State your topic as a question
Identify main concepts or keywords
Test the topic  --  Look for keywords and synonyms and related terms for the information sought</li></ul>	Subject headings...
20<br />How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 2: FIND BACKGROUND INFORMATION</li></li></ul><li>Research Tools - Catalogs<br...
Preparation relatively labor-intensive</li></ul>Emphasis on precision<br /><ul><li>Implies a learning curve to use success...
Basically all materials except periodical articles
Books
AV’s
Govt. documents
Maps
Music Scores</li></ul>Ca. 400,000 items<br />
Internet Tools<br />Google and Wikipedia aren’t evil, just use them for the correct purpose in your research.<br />
Research Tools – Catalogs - OhioLink<br />Materials owned by all Ohio colleges, universities, several public libraries<br ...
How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 3: USE DATABASES TO FIND PERIODICAL ARTICLES</li></li></ul><li>  Research Tools - Dat...
  Research Tools - Databases<br />Often tools for locating journal and newspaper articles<br />Most are subject-specific –...
  Research Tools - Databases<br />BIG THREE<br />Academic Search Premier<br />Lexis-Nexis<br />Opposing Viewpoints<br />Se...
How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 5: EVALUATE WHAT YOU FIND</li></ul>How to interpret the basics<br />  1. Accuracy of ...
Created Annotated Bibliography<br />30<br />
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Ws research 2011

  1. 1. Research Methods and Tools @Heterick Memorial Library<br />Traci Welch Moritz<br />Public Services Librarian/Assistant Professor<br />
  2. 2. Remember to consult research guide<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Annotated Bibliography<br />Allows you to see what is out there<br />Helps you narrow your topic and discard any irrelevant materials<br />Aids in developing the thesis <br />Makes you a better scholar<br />
  4. 4. Let’s Get Started<br />Research ethics<br />Writing well<br />Defining research topic<br />Tools for research<br />Availability of information<br />
  5. 5. Research Ethics<br /> ACADEMIC INTEGRITY <br />
  6. 6. Research Ethics<br />Copyright- intended to promote the arts and the sciences. It does this by providing authors of original literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works the ability to control how their work is used by others.<br />
  7. 7. Research Ethics<br />Plagiarism - “...the wrongful appropriation or purloining, and publication as one’s own, the ideas or the expression of the ideas (literary, artistic, musical, mechanical, etc.) of an other.” – see Heterick Help Page and Student Code of Conduct<br />
  8. 8. Research Ethics<br />In other words, to plagiarize is to copy someone else’s work without giving him/her credit.<br />Plagiarism is not always intentional. You can do it by accident, but it is still against the law. If you ever have a question about whether something is plagiarized, please ask!<br />1<br />1. How not to plagiarize your report -- Shannon Hosier Mersand<br />
  9. 9. Research Ethics<br />2<br />How may I avoid plagiarizing?<br />Identify any information that would not be considered common knowledge<br />Unless in direct quotes, make sure you paraphrase what the original author said<br />Use a quote if you can’t think of a way to paraphrase the information<br />always, Always, ALWAYS cite the source of any information in your paper which is not considered common knowledge. If you are unsure if something is common knowledge, cite it! <br />2 How not to plagiarize your report -- Shannon Hosier Mersand<br />
  10. 10. RefWorks<br /> REFWORKS<br />
  11. 11. Research Ethics<br />Things that are found in a number of places, and are likely to be known by a large number of people.<br />Examples:<br />The sky is blue<br />Grass is usually green<br />George Washington was the 1st president of the United States<br />11<br />So what is common knowledge<br />3<br />3 How not to plagiarize your report -- Shannon Hosier Mersand<br />
  12. 12. Research Ethics<br />What does paraphrase mean?<br />Main Entry: 1para·phrase 1 : a restatement of a text, passage, or work giving the meaning in another form<br />From Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary http://www.m-w.com<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Research Ethics<br />4<br />What does it mean to put something in my own words?<br />When you paraphrase something, it is different than putting it in your own words. When you put something in your own words, you are making a statement about the information you have found, rather than just restating the information. Usually there is an opinion of some sort in something “In your own words”<br />4 How not to plagiarize your report -- Shannon Hosier Mersand<br />
  14. 14. Research Ethics<br />What is a quote?<br />Main Entry: 1quote 1 a : to speak or write (a passage) from another usually with credit acknowledgment b : to repeat a passage from, especially in substantiation or illustration<br />From Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary http://www.m-w.com<br />
  15. 15. How to do RESEARCH<br />
  16. 16. How to do research<br />Talk to your instructors; they are here to help you!<br />Visit the librarians; we are here to help you!<br />
  17. 17. How to do research<br />Seven Steps of the Research Process<br />Amended with permission by the Librarians at the Olin and Uris Libraries of Cornell University<br />STEP 1: IDENTIFY AND DEVELOP YOUR TOPIC<br />STEP 2: FIND BACKGROUND INFORMATION<br />STEP 3:USE DATABASES TO FIND PERIODICAL ARTICLES <br />*STEP 4: FIND INTERNET RESOURCES<br />STEP 5: EVALUATE WHAT YOU FIND<br />STEP 6: PULLING IT ALL TOGETHER<br />STEP 7: CITE WHAT YOU FIND<br />
  18. 18. Research Strategy<br />
  19. 19. 19<br />How to do research<br />STEP 1: IDENTIFY AND DEVELOP YOUR TOPIC<br /><ul><li>State your topic as a question
  20. 20. Identify main concepts or keywords
  21. 21. Test the topic -- Look for keywords and synonyms and related terms for the information sought</li></ul> Subject headings in catalogs<br /> Built-in thesauri in many databases<br /> Reference sources<br /> Textbooks, lecture notes, readings<br /> Internet<br /> Librarians, Instructors<br />
  22. 22. 20<br />How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 2: FIND BACKGROUND INFORMATION</li></li></ul><li>Research Tools - Catalogs<br /><ul><li>Highly structured information environment</li></ul>Way individual records are arranged<br />Subject headings<br />Catalog software optimized for above<br />Deal with material in many formats<br /><ul><li>Implies heavy human involvement
  23. 23. Preparation relatively labor-intensive</li></ul>Emphasis on precision<br /><ul><li>Implies a learning curve to use successfully</li></li></ul><li>Research Tools - POLAR<br />Is the gateway to it all!!!<br />It’s always best to begin at Heterick and then work your way through the options.<br />POLAR search screen<br /><ul><li>Materials at Heterick and Law Library
  24. 24. Basically all materials except periodical articles
  25. 25. Books
  26. 26. AV’s
  27. 27. Govt. documents
  28. 28. Maps
  29. 29. Music Scores</li></ul>Ca. 400,000 items<br />
  30. 30. Internet Tools<br />Google and Wikipedia aren’t evil, just use them for the correct purpose in your research.<br />
  31. 31. Research Tools – Catalogs - OhioLink<br />Materials owned by all Ohio colleges, universities, several public libraries<br />Ca. 10 million items<br />Link from POLAR permits you to submit requests. Available from Heterick home page<br />Most requests arrive in 3-5 working days<br />No charge <br />Limited to 100 items at a time<br />May keep up to 84 days<br />
  32. 32. How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 3: USE DATABASES TO FIND PERIODICAL ARTICLES</li></li></ul><li> Research Tools - Databases<br />Highly structured<br />Way individual records are arranged<br />Subject headings<br />Content often limited by discipline<br />Material often limited to one format<br />Implies heavy human involvement<br />Preparation relatively labor-intensive<br />Emphasis on precision and currency<br />Fairly straight-forward to use<br />
  33. 33. Research Tools - Databases<br />Often tools for locating journal and newspaper articles<br />Most are subject-specific – some multi-disciplinary<br />Many give access to full text of articles<br />Heterick has 212 (currently)<br />27<br />
  34. 34. Research Tools - Databases<br />BIG THREE<br />Academic Search Premier<br />Lexis-Nexis<br />Opposing Viewpoints<br />Search by Subject/Discipline<br />
  35. 35. How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 5: EVALUATE WHAT YOU FIND</li></ul>How to interpret the basics<br /> 1. Accuracy of Web Documents <br /> 2. Authority of Web Documents <br /> 3. Objectivity of Web Documents <br /> 4. Currency of Web Documents <br /> 5. Coverage of the Web Documents<br />7<br />7 Kapoun, Jim. "Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction." C&RL News (July/August 1998): 522-523.<br />
  36. 36. Created Annotated Bibliography<br />30<br />
  37. 37. How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 6: Pulling it all together</li></ul>Accuracy. If your page lists the author and institution that published the page and provides a way of contacting him/her and . . . <br />Authority. If your page lists the author credentials and its domain is preferred (.edu, .gov, .org, or .net), and, . . <br />Objectivity. If your page provides accurate information with limited advertising and it is objective in presenting the information, and . . . <br />
  38. 38. How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 6: Pulling it all together</li></ul>Currency. If your page is current and updated regularly (as stated on the page) and the links (if any) are also up-to-date, and . . . <br />Coverage. If you can view the information properly--not limited to fees, browser technology, or software requirement, then . . . <br />You may have a Web page that could be of value to your research!<br />
  39. 39. How to do research<br /><ul><li>STEP 7: Cite what you find using standard formats</li></ul>There are four citation styles that are in frequent used at ONU. They are:<br /><ul><li>MLA (Modern Language Association)
  40. 40. APA (American Psychological Association)
  41. 41. CMS (Chicago Manual of Style)
  42. 42. Turabian (Kate Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 6th ed., 1996 )</li></li></ul><li>Research Ethics<br />What is a citation?<br />A citation is how you indicate where your information came from.<br />Each style has a way to do in-text citations, a way to do a bibliography, and a way to do footnotes and endnotes. <br />Always confirm with each instructor the style required.<br />You need to learn how to do citations, etc., but there is a citation software management tool available to all ONU students, faculty and staff…<br />34<br />
  43. 43. Research Ethics<br />Whenever you use information that is not common knowledge<br />Whenever you use information that you did not know before doing the research<br />Whenever you quote another person’s ideas or word, whether they are written or spoken<br />Whenever you paraphrase another person’s written or spoken words or ideas<br />35<br />8<br />When should I cite my sources?<br />8 How not to plagiarize your report -- Shannon Hosier Mersand<br />
  44. 44. 36<br />Librarians<br />on duty Mon - Fri 8am – 4:30pm, <br /> 6pm - 9pm<br /> Sundays 10am - 3:30pm<br />Come see us!!!<br />IM<br />Chat Reference<br />

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