Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Comments2_ East Central Portland coral survey 2009[1]

217 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Comments2_ East Central Portland coral survey 2009[1]

  1. 1.     AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO  MANAGING THE MARINE, COASTAL AND  WATERSHED RESOURCES OF THE EAST  CENTRAL PORTLAND  STATUS OF THE CORAL REEFS  Global Environmental Facility Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management National Environment and Planning Agency          
  2. 2.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   2    AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO MANAGING THE  MARINE, COASTAL AND WATERSHED RESOURCES OF  THE EAST CENTRAL PORTLAND  STATUS OF THE CORAL REEFS                Prepared by:    Marcia Creary  Environmental Data Manager  Caribbean coastal Data Centre  Centre for Marine Sciences  University of the West Indies  Mona Campus  Kingston 7  Jamaica WI    &    Tracey Edwards,   Team Leader, Projects Coordinator  Portland Environment Protection Association &  Environmental Coordinator/Community Animator  IWCAM Project      March 2010 
  3. 3.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   3    TABLE OF CONTENTS      List of Figures ................................................................................................................................................................. 4  List of Tables .................................................................................................................................................................. 6  List of Plates ................................................................................................................................................................... 7  Acronyms and Abbreviations ......................................................................................................................................... 9  Section 1: Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 10  1.1  Introduction .................................................................................................................................................... 10  1.2  Background ..................................................................................................................................................... 10  1.2.1  The GEF‐IWCAM Project ............................................................................................................................ 10  1.2.2  Drivers River Watershed Management Unit .............................................................................................. 11  1.2.3  Environmental Monitoring Committee ...................................................................................................... 12  1.3  Site Selection and Methodology ..................................................................................................................... 13  1.3.1  Site selection .............................................................................................................................................. 13  1.3.2  Monitoring Methodology ........................................................................................................................... 13  1.3.3  Monitoring Team ....................................................................................................................................... 13  1.3.4  Data Processing and Analysis ..................................................................................................................... 15  1.3.5  Report Preparation .................................................................................................................................... 15  Section 2: Results of Monitoring ................................................................................................................. 16  2.1  Dragon Point ................................................................................................................................................... 16  2.1.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 16  2.1.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 16  2.2  Alligator West ................................................................................................................................................. 19  2.2.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 19  2.2.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 19  2.3  Pellew Island ................................................................................................................................................... 22  2.3.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 22  2.3.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 22  2.4   Courtney’s Reef ............................................................................................................................................. 25  2.4.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 25  2.4.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 25  2.5   Drapers .......................................................................................................................................................... 29  2.5.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 29  2.5.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 29  2.6.   Dragon Bay .................................................................................................................................................... 32  2.6.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 32  2.6.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 32  2.7   Fairy Hill ......................................................................................................................................................... 35  2.7.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 35  2.7.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 35  2.8   Boston Bay ..................................................................................................................................................... 38  2.8.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 38  2.8.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 38  2.9   Policeman's Harbour ..................................................................................................................................... 41  2.9.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 41  2.9.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 41  2.10  Black River ...................................................................................................................................................... 44 
  4. 4.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   4  2.10.1  Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................. 44  2.10.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 44  2.11    See Me No More ........................................................................................................................................... 47  2.11.1   Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................ 47  2.11.2   Description of the Benthic Substrate ........................................................................................................ 47  2.12   Banana House ................................................................................................................................................ 50  2.12.1   Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................ 50  2.12.2   Description of the Benthic Substrate ........................................................................................................ 50  2.13.1   Manchioneal Harbour ................................................................................................................................. 53  2.13.1   Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................ 53  2.13.2  Description of the Benthic Substrate ......................................................................................................... 53  2.14   Horse Savannah River .................................................................................................................................... 56  2.14.1   Site Description and Methodology ............................................................................................................ 56  2.14.2   Description of the Benthic Substrate ........................................................................................................ 56  2.15   Summary of Monitoring Results .................................................................................................................... 59  2.15.1   Corals ......................................................................................................................................................... 59  2.15.2   Macroalgae and Dead Coral with Algae .................................................................................................... 61  2.15.3  Gorgonians and Sponges ............................................................................................................................ 61  2.15.4  Other Benthic Substrate Categories ........................................................................................................... 62  Section3: Status of Coral Reefs in Jamaica and the Wider Caribbean ......................................................... 63  3.1   Coral Cover at various locations around Jamaica .......................................................................................... 63  3.1.1   Monkey Island (Pellew Island) ................................................................................................................... 63  3.1.2   Island wide Reef Check Survey .................................................................................................................. 64  3.2   Coral Cover in the Wider Caribbean .............................................................................................................. 66  3.2.1   the eastern Caribbean ............................................................................................................................... 66  3.2.1  Status of Coral Reefs in the Wider Caribbean. ........................................................................................... 67  Section 4: Conculsions and Recommendations ........................................................................................... 69  4.1   Conclusions .................................................................................................................................................... 69  4.2   Recommendations ......................................................................................................................................... 69  References ................................................................................................................................................... 71  Appendices .................................................................................................................................................. 72  LIST OF FIGURES  Figure 1: Drivers River Watershed located to the east of Portland   Figure 2: Map of the Divers River Watershed  Figure 3: Satellite photograph showing the locations of the monitoring sites along the east central coast of  Portland.  Figure 4: Dragon Point ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure 5: Alligator West ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– 
  5. 5.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   5  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown).  Figure 6: Pellew Island ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure 7: Courtney’s Reef ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure  8:  Drapers  ‐  graph  illustrating  the  mean  percentage  cover  of  the  major  benthic  substrate  categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown).  Figure 9: Dragon Bay ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure  10:  Fairy  Hill  ‐  graph  illustrating  the  mean  percentage  cover  of  the  major  benthic  substrate  categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure 11: Boston Bay ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown).  Figure 12: Policeman's Harbour ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate  categories.    (Substrate  categories:  HCOR  ‐  Hard  coral;  GORG  ‐  Gorgonians;  SPON  –  Sponge;  ZOAN  –  Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae;  DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure 13: Black River ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure  14:  Se  Me  No  More  ‐  graph  illustrating  the  mean  percentage  cover  of  the  major  benthic  substrate  categories.    (Substrate  categories:  HCOR  ‐  Hard  coral;  GORG  ‐  Gorgonians;  SPON  –  Sponge;  ZOAN  –  Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae;  DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown).  Figure 15: Banana House ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA–  Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased  coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure 16: Manchioneal Harbour ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate  categories.    (Substrate  categories:  HCOR  ‐  Hard  coral;  GORG  ‐  Gorgonians;  SPON  –  Sponge;  ZOAN  –  Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae;  DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.) 
  6. 6.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   6  Figure 17: Horse Savannah River ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate  categories.    (Substrate  categories:  HCOR  ‐  Hard  coral;  GORG  ‐  Gorgonians;  SPON  –  Sponge;  ZOAN  –  Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae;  DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN – Unknown.)  Figure 18: Comparison of coral cover for the 14 sites monitored along the east central coastline of Portland  Figure19: Number of coral species found at the 14 monitoring sites along the east central coastline of Portland.  Figure 20:  Macroaglae combined with dead coral with algae for the 14 monitoring sites along the east central  coastline of Portland.  Figure 21:  Comparison of gorgonian cover at the 14 sites monitored along the east central coastline of Portland.  Figure 22: Comparison of sponge cover at the 14 sites monitored along the east central coastline of Portland.  Figure 23: Total observed change in mean percentage coral cover from 1977 to 200. (Source: Gardener et al, 2003)     LIST OF TABLES  Table 1: Dragon Point – the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ...................................... 17  Table 2: Alligator West ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ..................................... 20  Table 3: Courtney’s Reef ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ................................... 27  Table 4: Drapers ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ................................................ 30  Table 5: Dragon Bay ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. .......................................... 33  Table 6: Fairy Hill ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. .............................................. 36  Table 7: Boston Bay ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. .......................................... 39  Table 8: Policeman’s Harbour ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ........................... 42  Table 9: Black River ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ........................................... 45  Table 10: See Me No More ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ............................... 48  Table 11: Banana House ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ................................... 51  Table 12: Manchioneal Harbour ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ....................... 54  Table 13: Horse Savannah River ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories. ....................... 57  Table 14: Coral species found along the east central coastline of Portland ................................................................ 60  Table 15: Summary of the mean percentage cover for the substrate categories found at Monkey Island (Pellew  Island) for the period 2000 –2003 (Source: Chevannes Creary, 2001; Centre for Marine Sciences, 2006) and 2009.63  Table 16: Coral species identified at Monkey Island (Pellew Island) for the period 2000‐2003 (Source: Chevannes  Creary, 2001; Centre for Marine Sciences, 2006) and 2009. ....................................................................................... 64 
  7. 7.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   7  Table 17: Mean percentage cover for corals and algae for 36 sites around Jamaica. (Source: NEPA, 2009) .............. 65  Table 18: Combined summary of the mean percentage cover for the substrate categories at the coral reef sites in  Antigua, Dominica, Grenada, St Kitts, Saint Lucia, St Vincent and Tobago monitored over the period 2007 to 2009.  (Source: Creary 2008, Creary, 2009). ........................................................................................................................... 67      LIST OF PLATES  Plate 1: Members of the monitoring team.  Photo 1 ‐ (L‐R) Thomas Goreau, Tracey Edwards, Robert Hue and Elliott  Skyers.  Photo 2 – (L‐R) Thomas Goreau, Tracey Edwards, Nelsia English and Tyrone Brown.  Plate 2: Dragon Point ‐ Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 3: Dragon Point ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species  Plate 4: Alligator West ‐ Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 5: Alligator West ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 6: Pellew Island – Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 7: Pellew Island – Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 8: Courtney’s Reef ‐ Images showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate9: Courtney's Reef ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 10: Drapers: Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 11: Drapers – Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 12: Dragon Bay – Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 13: Dragon Bay ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species  Plate 14: Fairy Hill ‐ Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 15: Fairy Hill ‐ Images of substrate and some coral species.  Plate 16: Boston Bay ‐ Image showing the appearance of the reef.  Plate 17: Boston Bay ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 18: Policeman's Harbour ‐ Image of the appearance of the reef.  Plate 19: Policeman's Harbour – images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 20: Black River ‐ image showing the appearance of the reef.  Plate 21: Black River ‐ images of the substrate and some coral species. 
  8. 8.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   8  Plate 22: See Me No More – image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 23: See Me No More – Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 24: Banana House – image of the appearance of the reef.  Plate 25: Banana House – images of the substrate and some coral species  Plate 26: Manchioneal Harbour: ‐ image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 27: Manchioneal Harbour – images of the substrate and some coral species.  Plate 28: Horse Savannah River – image showing the general appearance of the reef.  Plate 29: Horse Savannah River – images of the substrate and some coral species.          
  9. 9.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   9    ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS  BJCMNP   Blue and John Crow Mountain National Park  CDC  CEHI     Caribbean Environmental Health Institute   CMS    Centre for Marine Sciences  CPACC    Caribbean Planning for Adaptation to Global Climate Change  CPCe    Coral Point Count with Excel extensions  GEF‐IWCAM  Global Environmental Facility ‐ Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management  GCRA     Global Coral Reef Alliance network   JSAC    Jamaica Sub Aqua club  MACC     Mainstreaming Adaptation to Climate Change   NEPA     National Environment and Planning Agency  NGO     Non‐Governmental Organization  NSWMA   National Solid Waste Management Authority   PAMP     Port Antonio Marine Park and Forest Corridor  PEPA    Portland Environmental Protections Association  PPCD     Portland Parish Council Department   SIDS     Small Island Developing States  UNEP     United Nations Environment Programme  UNDP     United Nations Development Programme  UWI    University of the West Indies          
  10. 10.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   10  SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION  1.1  INTRODUCTION  The parish of Portland is located at the north‐eastern section of Jamaica. The majority of the upper and middle  watershed areas of the parish are within the Blue and John Crow Mountain National Park (BJCMNP), Jamaica’s first  terrestrial national park opened in 1993. A proposal exists, under the protected areas system plan, to establish the  Port Antonio Marine Park and Forest Corridor (PAMP) which would include approximately 20km of coastline  extending from Downer’s Bluff to North East Point. The Corridor would include all the inshore marine habitats  from the coast to 200m in depth as well as the interior watershed area draining into the sea between these points,  up to the northern boundary of the BJCMNP.  Portland’s inshore marine environment includes a variety of seafloor habitats including corals, algae, sand, and  mud plains. Historically the coral reefs in and around the Port Antonio Marine Park site has included some of the  healthiest remaining examples in Jamaica and as such is of critical national priority. However, these reefs are under  threat from land‐based anthropogenic activities such as the effects of sewage, solid waste, wastewater and  sediment brought to the reef by rivers, runoff and prevailing currents.1  Under the auspices of the Environmental Management Committee of the Drivers River Watershed Management  Project a survey was carried out to gather information on the current status of the reefs in eastern Portland to  provide up to date data for management action. The coral reef survey was coordinated and implemented by  Tracey Edwards, Coordinator for the GEF‐IWCAM Environmental Monitoring Committee.  This report present the  result of the this survey conducted at fourteen (14) coral reef sites along the east central coastline of Portland  during the period July 15 to 24, 2009.      1.2  BACKGROUND  1.2.1  THE GEF‐IWCAM PROJECT  The Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management (IWCAM)  Project in Caribbean Small Island Developing  States (SIDS) commenced in 2005 and encompasses thirteen (13) participating SIDS.  The main implementing  agencies for this GEF project were the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations  Development Programme (UNDP). The National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) is the local  implementing agency for the Demonstration Project in Jamaica.  Caribbean coastal and watershed systems are among the most productive in the world, yet they are the most  threatened, due to rapid land use changes and coastal developments. The GEF‐IWCAM project aims to help  mitigate some of the impact of these developments across the Caribbean.  The Demonstration Project therefore  proposes to develop and implement a model Watershed Area Management Mechanism for the eastern Portland  area, incorporating the lessons and experiences gained elsewhere in the country, and capturing relevant examples  from other SIDS. The final objective of this project would be to demonstrate an effective mechanism for such a  management strategy and to identify where and how this model could be replicated in other areas of the country.  The map of Jamaica in Figure 1 shows eastern Portland and the location of the Divers River watershed.                                                                    1   Demonstration Project Paper.  Jamaica – An Integrated Approach to Managing the Marine, Coastal and  Watershed Resources of East‐Central Portland.  
  11. 11.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   11                            Figure 1: Drivers River Watershed located to the east of Portland2     1.2.2  DRIVERS RIVER WATERSHED MANAGEMENT UNIT  The Drivers River Watershed Project is among eight other demonstration projects across the Caribbean. The  watershed (Figure 2) which is rated one of the least degraded in the country and was chosen to help develop Best  Management Practices in environmental habits and activities. These were identified, planned and implemented  through a participatory process involving agency and community partnerships. Four committees were formed to  ensure the adaptation and implementation of these practices.  These were;  • Governance & Enforcement   • Sanitation and Sustainable Livelihood,  • Environmental Monitoring   • Public Education and Awareness  Stakeholders were given the opportunity to choose the committee they wished to work with, based on special  interest or natural talent. All of these committees reported back to the stakeholders at the monthly Stakeholders  Meeting.                                                                         2  GEF‐IWCAM Drivers River Watershed Management Model (Draft). NEPA  Drivers River  Watershed 
  12. 12.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   12                              Figure 2: Map of the Divers River Watershed3     1.2.3  ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING COMMITTEE  The main objectives of the Environmental Monitoring Committee were:  1. To capture baseline data for the Watershed   2. To monitor fresh water and marine sites for pollution trends.   3. To assess the status of fresh water and coastal resources and identify keystone species.  4. To identify areas of rich biological significance for conservation and protection.  5. To identify human activities, if any, that negatively impact on the natural resources of the Drivers River  Management Unit and make recommendation/s for mitigation against these harmful practices  Activities included reef assessments, mangrove monitoring/resuscitation, water quality/quantity monitoring, boat  tours, household surveys, bio‐monitoring and clean‐ups (beach & community).                                                                        3  Ibid   
  13. 13.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   13    1.3  SITE SELECTION AND METHODOLOGY  1.3.1  SITE SELECTION  The site selection process included consultation with the members of the Environmental Monitoring Committee,  representatives from the Portland Environmental Protections Associations (PEPA), NEPA and the local dive  operators Lady G Divers.  Monitoring sites were chosen to be representative of the entire Drivers River watershed  and were based on proximity to previous assessment sites (Goreau, 1996).  Fourteen (14) sites were selected, four  shallow sites (Drapers, Dragon Bay, Pellew Island and Manchioneal Harbour) and ten (10) sites of intermediate  depth (Dragon Point, Alligator West, Courtney’s Reef, Fairy Hill, Boston Bay, Policeman’s Harbour, Black River, See  Me No More, Banana House and Horse Savannah).  The location of the fourteen (14) monitoring sites is shown in  Figure 3.    1.3.2  MONITORING METHODOLOGY  The initial monitoring methodology called for five 20m transects to be established at each site, parallel to the  shoreline.   However due to the bottom topography and reef structure, this procedure was later modified with  respect to the individual sites. The methodology was maintained for most sites but where challenges existed, a  single 100m transect was employed instead. Where five 20m transects were laid out, they were placed in parallel  at a distance of 5m between each transect.   Images were captured along the transect at a height of 1m above the substrate.  This distance was maintained  with the use of a 1m PVC pipe which supported the diver. Still images was captured at every metre along the  transect line. Two cameras with flash attachment were used for image capture these were a Canon Powershot and  a Nikon D300 with a wide angle lens.  Other equipment employed included a 100m measuring tape, nylon cord, a  one metre PVC pipe and a recording slate. The monitoring dives were carried out during the period July 15‐24,  2009. All dives were carried out between 7am and 10am each day.    1.3.3  MONITORING TEAM  The monitoring team included Tracey Edwards, the Team Leader and Project Coordinator for the Portland  Environment Protection Association (PEPA) and also the Environmental Coordinator/Community Animator for the  IWCAM Project. Other members of the team included Dr. Thomas Goreau, President of the Global Coral Reef  Alliance (GCRA) network and a worldwide consultant on coral reef ecology and restoration, Robert Hue of the  Jamaica Sub‐Aqua Club (JSAC),  Tyrone Brown and Elliot Sykers (Lady G Divers).  Nelsia English,   Research Officer  for the GEF‐IWCAM Project also participated in the monitoring exercise (Plate 1).     
  14. 14.                                     Figure 3: Satellite photograph showing the locations of the monitoring sites along the east central coast of Portland.    Key to Monitoring Sites:  DP ‐ Dragon Point     PI‐ Pellew Island    CR ‐ Courtney's Reef     AL‐ Alligator West    DR ‐ Drapers Reef               DB ‐ Dragon Bay     FH ‐ Fairy Hill     BB ‐ Boston Bay      PH ‐ Policeman's Harbour    BR ‐ Black River              SMNM ‐ See Me No More   BH ‐ Banana House   MH ‐ Manchioneal Harbour   HS ‐ Horse Savannah 
  15. 15.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   15                      Plate 1: Members of the monitoring team.  Photo 1 ‐ (L‐R) Thomas Goreau, Tracey Edwards, Robert Hue and Elliott  Skyers.  Photo 2 – (L‐R) Thomas Goreau, Tracey Edwards, Nelsia English and Tyrone Brown.    1.3.4  DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS  Images in electronic format were submitted to the Centre for Marine Sciences, University of the West Indies (CMS,  UWI).  A total of 1731 images were analyzed from the fourteen (14) monitoring sites.  The random point count  method was used to estimate the benthic substrate cover from the images.  The Coral Point Count with Excel  extensions  (CPCe)  an  automated  random  point  count  method  designed  for  the  statistical  analysis  of  marine  benthic  communities (Kohler & Gill, 2006) was used.  The CPCe programme was used to randomly overlay 10  points on each image from which the benthic species or substrate category lying under each point was identified.     Once identified the codes are entered directly into an associate Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet.     1.3.5  REPORT PREPARATION  This report was prepared by the CMS on the request of the GEF‐IWCAM/NEPA Project and in collaboration with  Tracey Edwards, Environmental Coordinator/Community Animator for the GEF‐WCAM Project and Team Leader  and Project Coordinator for the Portland Environment Protection Association (PEPA).  The report is divided into  four sections.  Section 1 provides an introduction and background to the project.  Section 2 contains the result of  the monitoring programme.  Section 3 provides some coral reef data from other locations in Jamaica and the  Caribbean and Section 4 contains the conclusions and recommendations.        Photo  1    Photo 2 
  16. 16.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   16  SECTION 2: RESULTS OF MONITORING  2.1  DRAGON POINT  2.1.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Dragon Point was located approximately 100m from the shoreline east of Pellew Island and  about 100m from the Blue Logoon Villas.  The entry point from land was at the Turtle Cove Beach and the area had  an average depth of 13m.  Monitoring was conducted on July 15, 2009. Five 20m transects were established and  156 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Nikon D300 camera.  Resultant images were submitted in electronic  format to the CMS for data analysis.  From general observations the benthic topography was comprised of an undulating terrain, sloping gently to 13m.   The benthic substrate was comprised mainly of rocks and rubble with small areas of patch reef. The sandy bottoms  consisted of coarse white sand similar to that found on the small adjacent beach.  Coral cover was low with the site  dominated by a variety of fleshy algal species. Visibility was good and but few fishes were observed.  The general  appearance of the reef is shown in Plate 2.                          Plate 2: Dragon Point ‐ Image showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.1.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  At Dragon Point a total of ten (10) coral species were identified and these made up 5.89% of the overall benthic  substrate.  The most commonly occurring coral species were Porites astreoides and Siderastrea siderea which  made up 1.74% and 1.34% of the benthic cover respectively.  Other species identified included Agaricia   
  17. 17.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   17  agaricites(0.67%),  Diploria labyrinthiformis (0.13%), Diploria strigosa (0.13%), Meandrina meandrites (0.07%),  Montastraea annularis (0.60%), Porites divaricata (0.04%), Porites furcata (0.20%) and Porites porites (0.60%).  This  site was dominated by various species of macroalgae (83.1%) which included Halimeda (0.54%), Padina (0.07%)  and turf algae (3.08%).  Also found in the area were gorgonians (0.13%), encrusting sponges (0.74%) and  anemones (0.07%).  Dead coral and algae (0.87%) as well as recently dead coral (0.07%) were also observed. No  diseased corals were observed at this site. Pavement, rubble and sand made up 9.03% of the substrate while  0.20% was unknown.  These results are presented in Table 1 and illustrated in Figure 4.  Plate 3 shows images of  the substrate including selected coral species.    Table 1: Dragon Point – the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.  Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  0.67        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.13        Diploria strigosa  0.13        Meandrina meandrites  0.07        Montastraea annularis  0.60        Porites astreoides  1.74        Porites divaricata  0.40        Porites furcata  0.20        Porites porites  0.60        Siderastrea siderea  1.34  5.89  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  0.13  0.13  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  0.74  0.74  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Halimeda  0.54        Macroalgae  79.33        Padina  0.07        Turf algae  3.08  83.01  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.07  0.07  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.87        Recently dead coral  0.07  0.94  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Rubble  3.41       Sand  5.62   9.03  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.20  0.20  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      10 
  18. 18.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   18    Figure 4: Dragon Point - graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                Plate 3: Dragon Point ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.     Porites astreoides    Diploria strigosa     Siderastrea siderea    Macroalgae  
  19. 19.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   19  2.2  ALLIGATOR WEST  2.2.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The Alligator West monitoring site was located approximately 100m from shore with the entry point from land  located at Wilkes Bay, east of Frenchman’s Cove and the area had an average depth of 15m.  The were no beches  associated  with  this  monitoring  site.    Monitoring  was  carried  out  on  July  15,  2009.    Five  20m  transects  were  established and 195 images were taken at 0.5m intervals using a Nikon D300 camera.  Resultant images were  submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  General observations of the reef revealed a gently sloping, topography with a sudden shallow drop off. The benthic  substrate was comprised of small patch reefs with gorgonians, large bolder corals as well as rocks and rubble.  The  substrate was dominated by a variety of fleshy algal species.  Plate 4 shows the general appearance of the reef  at  Alligator West.                          Plate 4: Alligator West ‐ Image showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.2.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of ten (10) coral species were identified at the Alligator West site and these made up 4.83% of the total  benthic cover.  The most abundant coral species was Porites astreoides and Siderastrea siderea which accounted  for 1.19% and 1.41% of the benthic cover respectively.  Other species observed included Agaricia agaricites  (0.43%), Diploria labyrinthiformis (0.16%), Meandrina meandrites (0.22%), Millipora complanata (0.05%),  Montastraea annularis (0.16%), Porites divaricata (0.05%), Porites porites (0.60%) and Siderastrea siderea (0.54%).  Gorgonian cover was greater than that of corals (6.57%) while encrusting and erect sponges made up 2.12% and  0.98% of the benthic substrate. The site at Alligator West was dominated by macroalgae (81.33%) comprised 
  20. 20.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   20  primarily of turf algae (77.28%), other macroalgae (3.42%) and Padian (0.43%). Dead coral and algae as well as  recently dead coral made of 0.98% of the benthic substrate while no diseased or bleached corals were observed.   Pavement, rubble and sand made up 2.60% of the substrate while 0.16% was unknown.  These results are provided  in Table 2 and illustrated in Figure 5.  Images of the substrates and some of the coral species identified are shown  in Plate 5.  Table 2: Alligator West ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL   Agaricia agaricites  0.43        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.16        Meandrina meandrites  0.22        Millipora complanata  0.05        Montastraea annularis  0.16        Porites astreoides  1.19        Porites divaricata  0.05        Porites porites  0.60        Siderastrea radians  0.54        Siderastrea siderea  1.41  4.83  GORGONIANS  Gorgonia  6.57  6.57  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  2.12        Erect sponge  0.98  3.09  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00        Zoanthid  0.27  0.27  MACROALGAE  Macroalgae  3.42        Padina  0.43        Turf algae  77.48  81.33  OTHER LIVE  Other  0.16  0.16  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.92        Recently dead coral  0.05  0.98  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Pavement  0.00        Rubble  0.16        Sand  2.44  2.60  UNKNOWNS  Unknown  0.16  0.16  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      10       
  21. 21.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   21    Figure 5: Alligator West ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown).                                    Siderastrea siderea  Macroalgae     Porites astreoides    Gorgonians and sponges 
  22. 22.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   22  Plate 5: Alligator West ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.    2.3  PELLEW ISLAND  2.3.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Pellew Island (also called Monkey Island) is located in shallow water approximately 5m in  depth and is about 50m offshore.  The island is surrounded by a white sand beach and is also near to the San San  Beach on the mainland.  Access to the site is gained west of Pellew Island.  Monitoring was conducted on July 20,  2009. Five 20m transects were established and 102 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Nikon D300 camera.   Resultant images were submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  General observations of the area indicated that the topography was rugged with sand patches and patch reefs  covered with algae and dead coral.  Several species of sea urchins (Lytechinus veriegatus, Tripneustes ventricosus  and Echinometra viridis) were observed along with some fishes. The general appearance of the reef is shown in  Plate 6.                            Plate 6: Pellew Island – Image showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.3.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of seven (7) coral species were identified at the Pellew Island site which made up 9.04% of the benthic  cover.  The most abundant  coral species was Montastraea annularis (4.57%) and Montastraea faveolata (2.44%).  Other species identified included Agaricia agaricites (0.20%), Millipora complanata (0.30%), Porites astreoides   
  23. 23.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   23  (0.41%), Porites porites (1.02%) and Siderastrea siderea (0.10%).  Gorgonians (1.42%) and encrusting sponges  (0.81%) were also observed.  The macroalgal cover was low (3.15%) but this was replaced with dead coral and  algae (83.96%).  Sand and rubble made up 0.41% of the substrate and 1.22% was unknown.  These data are  presented in Table 3 below and illustrated in Figure 6.  Plate 7 contains images from the reef at Pellew Island  including some coral species.  Table 3:  Pellew Island ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  0.20        Millipora complanata  0.30        Montastraea annularis  4.57        Montastraea faveolata  2.44        Porites astreoides  0.41        Porites porites  1.02        Siderastrea siderea  0.10  9.04  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  1.42  1.42  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  0.81  0.81  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Dictyota  0.10        Halimeda  0.20        Macroalgae  2.74        Padina  0.10  3.15  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  83.96  83.96  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Rubble  0.20        Sand  0.20  0.41  UNKNOWN  Unknown  1.22  1.22  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      7   
  24. 24.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   24    Figure 6: Pellew Island ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                    Montastraea annularis    Montastraea faveolata    Dead coral with algae    Porities porities 
  25. 25.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   25  Plate 7: Pellew Island – Images of the substrate and some coral species.  2.4   COURTNEY’S REEF  2.4.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The Courtney’s Reef monitoring site was located west of the San San Beach House with access to the site from land  was gained to the west of the San San Beach restaurant. Monitoring was conducted on July 18, 2009. Five 20m  transects were established and 117 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Nikon D300 camera.  Resultant  images were submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  This site is similar in appearance o Dragon Point and Alligator West.  The benthic topography was generally flat  with white sand patches, small patch reefs containing small coral heads, gorgonians and macro‐algae.Freshwater  upwelling was also evident at this site.  The general appearance of this reef is shown in Plate 8.                        Plate 8: Courtney’s Reef ‐ Images showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.4.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of fourteen (14) coral species were identified at Courtney’s Reef and these made up 10.01% of the benthic  substrate cover.  Siderastrea siderea (3.07%) was the most abundant coral species with others including Agaricia  agaricites (1.35%), Diploria labyrinthiformis (0.45%), Diploria strigosa  (0.18%), Eusmilia fastigiata (0.27%),  Meandrina meandrites (0.27%), Millipora complanata (0.18%), Montastraea annularis (1.98%), Montastraea  cavernosa (0.27%), Montastraea faveolata (0.09%), Porites astreoides (1.08%), Porites divaricata (0.09%), Porites  furcata (0.09%) and Porites porites (0.63%).  Gorgonians made up 4.60% and sponges (encrusting and erect) made  up 4.87% on the benthic substrate. The zooanthid Palythoa sp (0.09%) was also identified on this reef.  The  macroalgae dominated the substrate (72.41%) with dead coral and algae making up 2.98%.  Sand made up a small   
  26. 26.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   26  proportion of the substrate (5.05%).  These results are presented in Table 4 and illustrated in Figure 7.  Images of  the substrates and some of the coral species identified are shown in Plate 9.     
  27. 27.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   27  Table 4: Courtney’s Reef ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.      Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  1.35        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.45        Diploria strigosa  0.18        Eusmilia fastigiata  0.27        Meandrina meandrites  0.27        Millipora complanata  0.18        Montastraea annularis  1.98        Montastraea cavernosa  0.27        Montastraea faveolata  0.09        Porites astreoides  1.08        Porites divaricata  0.09        Porites furcata  0.09        Porites porites  0.63        Siderastrea siderea  3.07  10.01  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  4.60  4.60  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  4.15        Erect sponge  0.72  4.87  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.09  0.09  MACROALGAE  Macroalgae  71.78        Padina  0.27        Turf algae  0.36  72.41  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  2.98  2.98  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Sand  5.05  5.05  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.00  0.00  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      14 
  28. 28.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   28    Figure 7: Courtney’s Reef ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                Plate 9: Courtney's Reef ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.    Montastraea annularis    Siderastrea siderea     Porites astreoides     Macroalgae 
  29. 29.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   29  2.5   DRAPERS  2.5.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Drapers was shallow, approximately 2‐3m in depth with the entry point located at Drapers  Beach.  This site was selected as a result of its history, and reputation as one of the most pristine reef remaining in  eastern Portland. Monitoring was conducted on July 22, 2009. A 100m transect was established at this site and 190  images were taken at 1m intervals using a Canon Powershot A540 camera.  The images were subsequently  submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  The patch reefs were located in very shallow water and in close proximity to shoreline exhibiting the typical spur  and groove formation.  General observation indicated the presence of many Diademia antilarium and few reef  fishes.  There were no visible macro‐algae.  Conditions were generally calm and visibility high. The general  appearance of the reef is shown in Plate 10.                           Plate 10: Drapers: Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  2.5.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of eleven (11) coral species were identified at the Drapers reef site which made up 21.33% on the benthic  substrate.  The most abundant coral species was Montastraea annularis which represented 4.29% of the benthic  cover. Other species identied at this site included Agaricia agaricites (2.84%), Diploria clivosa (0.39%), Diploria  labyrinthiformis (0.17%), Diploria strigosa (1.28%), Madracis mirabilis (0.95%), Millipora complanata (1.11%),  Porites astreoides (7.85%), Porites furcata (0.28%), Porites porites (1.78%) and Siderastrea siderea (0.39%).  Gorgonian and encrusting sponges made up 0.67% and 0.61% of the benthic substrate.  Macroalgae made up only  0.17% of the substrate, however dead coral and algae accounted for 68.01%. Rubble and sand made up 8.13% of   
  30. 30.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   30  the total benthic substrate.  These results are presented in Table 5 and illustrated in Figure 8. Images of the  substrates and some of the coral species identified are shown in Plate 11.        Table 5: Drapers ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  2.84        Diploria clivosa  0.39        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.17        Diploria strigosa  1.28        Madracis mirabilis  0.95        Millipora complanata  1.11        Montastraea annularis  4.29        Porites astreoides  7.85        Porites furcata  0.28        Porites porites  1.78        Siderastrea siderea  0.39  21.33  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  0.67  0.67  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  0.61  0.61  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Macroalgae  0.17  0.17  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  69.10  69.10  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Rubble  0.22        Sand  7.91  8.13  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.00  0.00  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      11     
  31. 31.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   31    Figure  8:  Drapers -  graph  illustrating  the  mean  percentage  cover  of  the  major  benthic  substrate  categories.    (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown).                                    Montastraea annularis    Porites astreoides    Agaricia agaricites  Dead coral with algae 
  32. 32.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   32  Plate 11: Drapers – Images of the substrate and some coral species.    2.6.   DRAGON BAY  2.6.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Dragon Bay was located 65m from shoreline in shallow water of depth ranging from 3‐4m.   A small tributary, which runs parallel to the Dragon Bay Hotel, empties into this area. The entry point from land is  adjacent  to  the  Dragon  Bay  Hotel.    Monitoring  was  conducted  on  July  22,  2009.  Five  20m  transects  were  established and 111 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Canon Powershot A540 camera.  Resultant images  were submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.    The bottom topography at Dragon Bay was comprised of flat sandy bottom with small patch reefs dominated by  encrusting calcareous algae with very low levels of macroalgae.  Some sea urchins (Diadema and Tripneustes) were  observed as well as a few fish species.  The general appearance of the reef is shown in Plate 12.                        Plate 12: Dragon Bay – Image showing the general appearance of the reef.  2.6.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of nine (9) coral species were identified at Dragon Bay which made up 8.18% of the benthic substrate. Of  note was the presence of Acropora palmata (0.75%), a reef building species which has declines in abundance  Jamaica in the past decades (Gardener, 2003).  Other coral species identified include Agaricia agaricites (0.38%),  Diploria clivosa (0.85%), Diploria strigosa (1.60%), Millipora complanata (1.60%), Montastraea annularis (1.60%),  Montastraea cavernosa (0.28%), Porites astreoides (1.03%) and Siderastrea radians (0.09%).  Gorgonians and  encrusting sponges were also observed on this reef making up 0.56% and 2.92% respectively of the benthic  substrate cover. The zoanthid, Palythoa sp, (0.19%) was also observed.  Macroalgae, comprised primarily of turf  algae accounted for 37.73% while dead coral and algae made up 36.59% on the benthic substrate.  Pavement and   
  33. 33.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   33  sand accounted for 13.63% of the benthic substrate while 0.19% was unknown.  These results are presented in  Table 6 below and illustrated in Figure 9. Images of the substrates and some of the coral species identified are  shown in Plate 13.      Table 6: Dragon Bay ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Acropora palmata  0.75        Agaricia agaricites  0.38        Diploria clivosa  0.85        Diploria strigosa  1.60        Millipora complanata  1.60        Montastraea annularis  1.60        Montastraea cavernosa  0.28        Porites astreoides  1.03        Siderastrea radians  0.09  8.18  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  0.56  0.56  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  2.92  2.92  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.19  0.19  MACROALGAE  Macroalgae  1.69        Turbinaria  0.28        Turf algae  35.65  37.63  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  36.59  36.59  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Pavement  3.01        Sand  10.72  13.73  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.19  0.19  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      9     
  34. 34.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   34    Figure 9: Dragon Bay - graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                    Acropora palmata    Diplora strigosa   Montastraea annularis  Porites astreoides (also macroalgae and dead coral  with algae)
  35. 35.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   35  Plate 13: Dragon Bay ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species  2.7   FAIRY HILL  2.7.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Fairy Hill was located approximately 90m from shore in water of averaged depths of 17m.   The entry point to this site is located adjacent to the Fairy Hill Beach houses east of Boston Bay.  Monitoring was  conducted on July 16, 2009. Five 20m transects were established and 108 images were taken at 1m intervals using  a Nikon D 300 camera.  Resultant images were submitted in electronic format  to the CMS for data analysis.  The benthic topography of this site was comprised of gentle slopes, white sand patches and large dead coral  boulders covered with algae. Lobsters, reef fishes, sponges, other marine organisms were also observed.  The  general appearance of the reef is shown in Plate 14.                        Plate 14: Fairy Hill ‐ Image showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.7.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of nine (9) coral species were identified at the Fairy Hill reef site which made up 3.98% of the benthic  substrate cover.  Montastraea annularis (1.43%) was the most common coral species with other species such as  Agaricia agaricites (0.20%), Madracis mirabilis (0.10%), Meandrina meandrites (0.10%), Montastraea faveolata  (0.31%), Porites astreoides (0.41%), Porites porites (0.51%), Siderastrea radians (0.20%) and Siderastrea siderea  (0.72%).  Other organisms observed include gorgonians (2.04%), encrusting sponges (0.82%) and erect sponges  (0.20%). This site was also dominated by macroaglae account for 86.41% of the total cover with Dictyota (0.51%),  Halimida (0.72%), Padina (0.82%) and turf algae (17.47%) specifically identified. There were no diseased corals  observed by dead coral an algae accounted for 0.51% of the substrate cover.  Sand, pavement and rubble   
  36. 36.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   36  accounted for 6.03% of the benthic substrate.  These results are presented in Table 7 and illustrated in Figure 10.  Images of the substrates and some of the coral species identified are shown in Plate 15.      Table 7: Fairy Hill ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories Individual % cover Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  0.20        Madracis mirabilis  0.10        Meandrina meandrites  0.10        Montastraea annularis  1.43        Montastraea faveolata  0.31        Porites astreoides  0.41        Porites porites  0.51        Siderastrea radians  0.20        Siderastrea siderea  0.72  3.98  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  2.04  2.04  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  0.82        Erect sponge  0.20  1.02  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Dictyota  0.51        Halimeda  0.72        Macroalgae  66.91        Padina  0.82        Turf algae  17.47  86.41  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.51  0.51  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Sand  6.03  6.03  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.00  0.00  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      9   
  37. 37.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   37    Figure  10:  Fairy  Hill  ‐ graph  illustrating  the  mean  percentage  cover  of  the  major  benthic  substrate  categories.    (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                Plate 15: Fairy Hill ‐ Images of substrate and some coral species.    Macroalgae    Montastraea annularis    Siderastrea siderea    Porites astreoides
  38. 38.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   38  2.8   BOSTON BAY  2.8.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Boston Bay was located approximately 100m from the shoreline in average depths of 18m.   The point of entry from land was west of Boston Beach. Monitoring was conducted on July 18, 2009. Five 20m  transects were established and 121 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Nikon D 300 camera.  Resultant  images were submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  The benthic topography was comprised of gentle slopes, deep trenches, rubble and sand.  Also observed were a  wide variety of gorgonians (sea whips, sea plumes, sea rods and sea fans) and some fishes. The general appearance  of the reef is shown in Plate 16.                          Plate 16: Boston Bay ‐ Image showing the appearance of the reef.    2.8.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  Twelve (12) species were identified at the Boston Bay site representing a total coral cover of 5.90%.  The dominant  coral species was Siderastrea siderea (2.82%) with other species such as Agaricia agaricites (0.44%), Diploria  clivosa (0.09%), Diploria labyrinthiformis (0.09%), Eusmilia fastigiata (0.35%), Meandrina meandrites (0.18%),  Montastraea annularis (0.79%), Montastraea cavernosa (0.09%), Montastraea faveolata (0.09%), Porites  astreoides (0.62%), Porites porites (0.18%), Siderastrea radians (0.18%) also observed.  The occurrence of  gorgonians was high, accounting for 8.11% of the benthic cover while encrusting and erect sponges accounted for  2.82% and 0.62% respectively. The macroalge dominated this site, accounting for 75.86% of the benthic cover  including Halimeda (0.18%) and Padina (0.09%).  No dead coral and algae or diseased corals were observed and   
  39. 39.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   39  sand accounted for 6.70% of the substrate. These results are presented in Table 8 below and illustrated in Figure  11. Images of the substrates and some of the coral species identified are shown in Plate 17.  Table 8: Boston Bay ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  0.44        Diploria clivosa  0.09        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.09        Eusmilia fastigiata  0.35        Meandrina meandrites  0.18        Montastraea annularis  0.79        Montastraea cavernosa  0.09        Montastraea faveolata  0.09        Porites astreoides  0.62        Porites porites  0.18        Siderastrea radians  0.18        Siderastrea siderea  2.82  5.90  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  8.11  8.11  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  2.82        Erect sponge  0.62  3.44  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Halimeda  0.18        Macroalgae  75.59        Padina  0.09  75.86  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.00  0.00  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Sand  6.70  6.70  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.00  0.00  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      12     
  40. 40.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   40    Figure 11: Boston Bay - graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown).                                Plate 17: Boston Bay ‐ Images of the substrate and some coral species.    Sponges and Gorgonians    Siderastrea siderea   Diploria labyrinthiformis    Macroalgae 
  41. 41.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   41  2.9   POLICEMAN'S HARBOUR  2.9.1  SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The Policeman’s Harbour monitoring site was located 80m from the shore in water of average depth of 15m.  The  entry point from land was at Long Road. Monitoring was conducted on July 14, 2009. Five 20m transects were  established and 117 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Canon Powershot A540 camera.  Resultant images  were submitted in electronic format o the CMS for data analysis.  The general benthic topography of the Policeman’s Harbour monitoring site was undulating, with some massive  corals interspersed with rocks and rubble.  The benthic substrate was mostly algae covered but gorgonians (sea  fans and sea whips) were also observed. The visibility at this site was low and there was evidence of high  sedimentation, possible as the results of inflows from the Black River. The general appearance of the reef is shown  in Plate 18.                        Plate 18: Policeman's Harbour ‐ Image of the appearance of the reef.    2.9.2  DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  Eleven (11) coral species were identified at the Policeman’s Harbour reef.  This accounted for 13.64% of the total  benthic substrate cover. The most abundant species was Porites astreoides (3.69%), Siderastrea siderea (2.84%),  Montastraea annularis (2.18%),  and Agaricia agaricites (2.08%).  Other species present include Diploria  labyrinthiformis (0.57%), Diploria strigosa (1.23%), Millipora complanata (0.09%), Montastraea cavernosa (0.09%),  Montastraea faveolata (0.09%), Porites porites (0.66%) and Siderastrea radians (0.09%).  Gorgonians (4.17%),  encrusting sponges (2.18%) and erect sponges (0.57%) were also observed.  Macroalgae dominated this site  accounting for 72.82% of the benthic cover.  The macroalgae component included turf algae (68.56%), Dictyota  (1.23%), Halimeda (0.28%), Padina (0.28%) and other macroalgae (2.46%). Dead coral and algae made up 2.08%  while sand made up 4.36% on the benthic cover. Unknown accounted for 0.19% 0f the benthic cover.   These data 
  42. 42.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   42  are provided in Table 9 and illustrated in Figure 12.  Plate 19 provides some images of the reef included selected  coral species.    Table 9: Policeman’s Harbour ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  2.08        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.57        Diploria strigosa  1.23        Millipora complanata  0.09        Montastraea annularis  2.18        Montastraea cavernosa  0.09        Montastraea faveolata  0.09        Porites astreoides  3.69        Porites porites  0.66        Siderastrea radians  0.09        Siderastrea siderea  2.84  13.64  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  4.17  4.17  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  2.18        Erect sponge  0.57  2.75  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Dictyota  1.23        Halimeda  0.28        Macroalgae  2.46        Padina  0.28        Turf algae  68.56  72.82  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  2.08  2.08  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Sand  4.36  4.36  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.19  0.19  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      11   
  43. 43.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   43    Figure  12:  Policeman's  Harbour -  graph  illustrating  the  mean  percentage  cover  of  the  major  benthic  substrate  categories.   (Substrate categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR –  Other, live; DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder;  UNKN – Unknown.)                                    Siderastrea siderea    Porites astreoides    Diploria strigosa    Gorgonian 
  44. 44.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   44  Plate 19: Policeman's Harbour – images of the substrate and some coral species.    2.10  BLACK RIVER  2.10.1 SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The Black River monitoring site was located in Long Bay approximately 150m from shore in waters of average  depths of 18m.  Entry point to the monitoring site was at the Black River Bridge at Long Bay. Monitoring was  conducted on July 20, 2009. Five 20m transects were established and 102 images were taken at 1m intervals using  a Nikon D300 camera.  Resultant images were submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis  The general benthic topography of the Black River site was slightly undulating with sudden shallow drop offs.  This  site was also dominated by macroalgae with a few gorgonians observed.   The currents were generally strong in  this area and heavily impacted by sediment as a result of the outflow from the Black River.   Macroalgae were  common and lionfishes were also observed at this site.  The general appearance of the reef is shown in Plate 20.                          Plate 20: Black River ‐ image showing the appearance of the reef.  2.10.2 DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  A total of six (6) coral species were identified at the Black River Reef and these made up 6.28% of the benthic  substrate.  The species identified included Agaricia agaricites (1.06%), Montastraea annularis (0.43%), Porites  astreoides (2.02%), Porites divaricata (0.21%), Porites porites (0.75%) and Siderastrea siderea (1.81%).  The  gorgonians and sponges (encrusting and erect) made up 1.17% each of the substrate while zoanthids accounted  for 0.11%.  Macroalgae also dominated by algae which made up 84.45% with dead coral and algae making up only  0.11% of the total.  Sand made up 6.71% of the total substrate. These data are provided in Table 10 and illustrated  in Figure 13.  Plate 21 provides some images of the reef included selected coral species.   
  45. 45.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   45      Table 10: Black River ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  1.06        Montastraea annularis  0.43        Porites astreoides  2.02        Porites divaricata  0.21        Porites porites  0.75        Siderastrea siderea  1.81  6.28  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  1.17  1.17  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  0.96        Erect sponge  0.21  1.17  ZOANTHIDS  Zoanthid  0.11  0.11  MACROALGAE  Dictyota  0.53        Halimeda  2.45        Macroalgae  81.47  84.45  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.11  0.11  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Rubble  0.11        Sand  6.60  6.71  UNKNOWN  Unknown  0.00  0.00  Total percentage cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      6                   
  46. 46.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   46      Figure 13: Black River ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                Plate 21: Black River ‐ images of the substrate and some coral species.    Agaricia agaricites    Montastraea annularis    Siderastrea siderea  Porites astreoides 
  47. 47.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   47    2.11     SEE ME NO MORE  2.11.1   SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The See Me No More monitoring site was located 280m from shore in water of average depth of 15m.  The entry  point from land was at the See Me No More River.  Monitoring was conducted on July 20, 2009. Five 20m transects  were established and 103 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Nikon D300 camera.  Resultant images were  submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  The benthic topography was gently sloping with numerous drop offs.  The patch reefs contained large boulder  corals, some rocks, rubble, sand patches.  Much of the reef was cover with macroaglae and the lionfish was  observed in this area. The reef was influenced by the Christmas and See Me No More Rivers which resulted in  suspended sediment impacting the reef. Also the currents were very strong in this area. The general appearance of  the reef is shown in Plate 22.                        Plate 22: See Me No More – image showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.11.2   DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  Coral cover at the See Me No More reef site was low accounting for only 2.76% of the benthic substrate.  The  seven (7) species identified included Agaricia agaricites (0.92%), Diploria labyrinthiformis (0.10%), Montastraea  annularis (0.31%), Montastraea cavernosa (0.10%), Porites astreoides (0.10%), Siderastrea radians (0.20%) and  Siderastrea siderea (1.02%).  Gorgonians and sponges (encrusting and erect) accounted or 5.10% and 1.73% of the  substrate respectively.  Macroalgae, comprising mainly of turf algae, made up 80.41% of the benthic substrate,  while dead coral and algae accounted for 0.51%.  Sand made up 1.94% of the substrate while 7.55% was unknown.  These data are provided in Table 11 and illustrated in Figure 14.  Plate 23 provides some images of the reef  included selected coral species. 
  48. 48.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   48        Table 11: See Me No More ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  0.92        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.10          Montastraea annularis  0.31        Montastraea cavernosa  0.10        Porites astreoides  0.10        Siderastrea radians  0.20        Siderastrea siderea  1.02  2.76  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  5.10  5.10  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  1.33        Erect sponge  0.41  1.73  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.00  0.00  MACROALGAE  Padina  0.20        Turf algae  80.20  80.41  OTHER LIVE  Anemones  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.51  0.51  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Sand  1.94  1.94  UNKNOWN  Unknown  7.55  7.55  Total percentage cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      7   
  49. 49.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   49    Figure 14: Se Me No More ‐ graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown).                                  Plate 23: See Me No More – Images of the substrate and some coral species.  Siderastrea siderea  Turf algae (macroalgae)  Montastraea cavernosa    Agaricia agaricites and gorgonians 
  50. 50.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   50    2.12    BANANA HOUSE  2.12.1   SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The reef at the Banana House monitoring site was located approximately 100m from shore in waters of 13m.  The  point of entry for this site was at the Manchioneal fishing village. Monitoring was conducted on July 21, 2009. Five  20m transects were established and 104 images were taken at 1m intervals using a Nikon D300 camera.  Resultant  images were submitted in electronic format to the CMS for data analysis.  The benthic topography at the Banana House monitoring site was similar to that at See Me No More with a  relatively undulating topography characterized by mainly rubble and macroalgae. A few bolder corals and some  gorgonians (sea fans and sea whips) were observed.  Diadema and an encrusting black sponge were also observed  at this location.  The current was generally moderate to strong with this reef reflecting the influence of the  Christmas and Weybridge Rivers. The general appearance of the reef is shown in Plate 24.                      Plate 24: Banana House – image of the appearance of the reef.    2.12.2   DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  At the site at Banana House ten (10) coral species were observed which accounted for 6.42% of the benthic  substrate cover.  Siderastrea siderea (3.01%) was the most abundant species with Agaricia agaricites (0.30%),  Diploria clivosa (0.90%), Diploria labyrinthiformis (0.40%), Diploria strigosa (1.00%), Millipora complanata (0.20%),  Montastraea cavernosa (0.30%), Montastraea faveolata (0.10%), Porites porites (0.10%) and Siderastrea radians  (0.10%) also occurred in this area.  Gorgonians made up 4.41%) of the benthic substrate while the sponges  (encrusting and erect) accounted for 6.42%. The zoanthids Palythoa sp (0.20%) was also detected.  The site was  dominated by macroalgae (67.40%) with dead coral with algae making up only 0.90% of the benthic cover.  Sand,  pave and rubble accounted of 14.04%.  These data are provided in Table 12 and illustrated in Figure 15.  Plate 25  provides some images of the reef included selected coral species.   
  51. 51.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   51  Table 12: Banana House ‐ the mean percentage cover for the benthic substrate categories.    Major Category  Species/Categories  Individual % cover  Sub total  CORAL  Agaricia agaricites  0.30        Diploria clivosa  0.90        Diploria labyrinthiformis  0.40        Diploria strigosa  1.00        Millipora complanata  0.20        Montastraea cavernosa  0.30        Montastrea faveolata  0.10        Porites porites  0.10        Siderastrea radians  0.10        Siderastrea siderea  3.01  6.42  GORGONIANS  Gorgonian  4.41  4.41  SPONGES  Encrusting sponge  6.32        Erect sponge  0.10  6.42  ZOANTHIDS  Palythoa sp.  0.20  0.20  MACROALGAE  Macroalgae  67.40  67.40  OTHER LIVE  Other live  0.00  0.00  DEAD CORAL WITH ALGAE  Dead coral with algae  0.80        Recently dead coral  0.10  0.90  CORALLINE ALGAE  Coralline algae  0.00  0.00  DISEASED CORALS  Diseased coral  0.00  0.00  SAND, PAVEMENT, RUBBLE  Sand  14.04  14.04  UNKNOWNS  Unknown  0.20  0.20  Total Percentage Cover     100.00  100.00  # of Coral Species      10     
  52. 52.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   52    Figure 15: Banana House - graph illustrating the mean percentage cover of the major benthic substrate categories.  (Substrate  categories: HCOR ‐ Hard coral; GORG ‐ Gorgonians; SPON – Sponge; ZOAN – Zoanthids; MACA– Macroalgae; OTHR – Other, live;  DCAL ‐ Dead coral with algae; CALG – Coralline algae; DCOR– Diseased coral; SAND – Sand, rubble, rock and boulder; UNKN –  Unknown.)                                Plate 25: Banana House – images of the substrate and some coral species    Diploria labyrinthiformis and Diploria strigosa    Siderastrea siderea    Montastraea cavernosa    Gorgonians and macroalgae 
  53. 53.   Caribbean Coastal Data Centre, Centre for Marine Sciences, UWI   53    2.13.1   MANCHIONEAL HARBOUR  2.13.1   SITE DESCRIPTION AND METHODOLOGY  The monitoring site at Manchioneal Harbour was located approximately 200m from shore in shallow water with  average depths of 3m. The point of entry for this site was the Manchioneal fishing village. Monitoring was  conducted on July 24, 2009. A 100m transect was established at this site and 103 images were taken at 1m  intervals using a Canon Powershot A540 camera.  The images were subsequently submitted in electronic format to  the CMS for data analysis   The benthic topography of the Manchioneal Harbour site was generally undulating and rocky with steep but  shallow drop offs.  The visibility was generally low as a result of high levels of sedimentation from the Driver River  and the currents were very strong. The benthic substrate was comprised primarily of rocks and rubble with some  patch reefs, gorgonians and macro‐algae.  A few sea urchins (Diadema and Echinometra) and encrusting sponges  were observed.  The general appearance of the reefs is shown in Plate 26.                      Plate 26: Manchioneal Harbour: ‐ image showing the general appearance of the reef.    2.13.2 DESCRIPTION OF THE BENTHIC SUBSTRATE  The reefs at Manchioneal Harbour exhibited low coral cover (4.40%) with only four coral species identified.   Diploria strigosa (2.76%) was the most abundant coral species with Diploria clivosa (1.43%), Montastraea annularis  (0.10%) and Porites astreoides (0.10%) also present. Gorgonians (0.10%) and encrusting sponges (2.86%) were also  observed.  This site was dominated by macroalgae, accounting for 78.94% of the benthic substrate which was  comprised primarily of turf algae (76.89%) with Dictyota (0.92%), Halimeda (0.20%0, and Padina (0.31%) also  identified.  Dead coral and algae was also observed making up 4.81% of the substrate and sand account for 8.79%  of the total.  Unknown accounted for 0.10% of the substrate.  These data are provided in Table 13 and illustrated in  Figure 16. Plate 27 provides some images of the reef included selected coral species.   

×