Tonya Foore
Advanced General
Psychology PSY492 UB
 The media has a personal responsibility in the
over sexual youth, leading to risky behavior
and teen pregnancy. Children...
1.
 Berry (2008) stated data was taken
from a national longitudinal
survey of teens (12–17 years of age,
monitored to 15–20 ...
 Brown’s research (2006) tracked over time
whether exposure to sexual content in four
mass media outlets (which included
...
 The results of Brown’s research stated white
adolescents in the top quintile of sexual media
diet when 12 to 14 years ol...
2.
 The article states that
female video game
characters are more likely
than male characters to
be portrayed as
sexualized ...
 An example of a selected audience being
sexualized is the cult favorite Grant Theft
Auto, all versions. Grand Theft Auto...
 Adolescents can spend
nearly equal amounts of
time listening to the
radio, although music is
used frequently as an
accom...
 The Parents' Music Resource Center, a
nonprofit group organized to address
the issue of lyrics that "glorified graphic
s...
 E.W. Austin conducted research with
conclusions that can confidently show what
media literacy has promise as part of a s...
 Austin performed a posttest-only quasi-
experiment with control groups was conducted
at 22 school and community sites in...
 Shows can be monitored and
tracked, channels banned,
and time watched recorded.
A parent or guardian can
simply use thes...
What would be the intention of
research into the subject, without
researching ways to inhibit the
actions?
 A call for mo...
 With this research parents, guardians, teachers,
and peers will hopefully take into deliberation
the amount of media tha...
 Austin, E.W. et al. (2008). Effects of a Peer-Led Media Literacy Curriculum on
Adolescents' Knowledge and Attitudes Towa...
 Dill, K. & Thill, K. (2007). Video Game Characters and the
Socialization of Gender Roles: Young People’s Perceptions
Mir...
Media, Youth, & Sexuality
Media, Youth, & Sexuality
Media, Youth, & Sexuality
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Media, Youth, & Sexuality

1,830 views

Published on

This is a PowerPoint presentation of a review of research literature for Instructor Katina Clarke, Argosy University, Chicago (2010), Advanced General Psychology,PSY492 UB.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,830
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
33
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The media’s messages, both subliminal and blatant, play a very big part in today’s society, especially in regards to youth and sexualization. It is impractical to believe that all children will be protected from sexually oriented television shows or music, but we as researchers need to understand, evaluate, and find preventive methods in prolonging these negative sexual images and preparing youth for a healthy sexual future.
  • The following slides will demonstrate televised media’s influence on youth sexuality, as well as their responsibility in the teen pregnancy epidemic.
  • The results stated teens who were exposed to high levels of television sexual content (90th percentile) were twice as likely to experience a pregnancy in the subsequent 3 years, compared with those with lower levels of exposure (10th percentile) (2008). The facts in the research show there is a positive correlation between the amount of television exposure displaying sexual content leads to higher sexual orientation and teen pregnancy.
  • The relationship was not statistically significant for black adolescents after controlling for other factors that were more predictive, including parental disapproval of teen sex and perceived permissive peer sexual norms. Brown’s article and research correlated with Berry’s article in regards to media influence on youth sexuality.
  • The following slides will demonstrate the manipulation on youth sexuality in regards to highly influential video games.
  • A very blatant way the media is targeting a younger audience is video games.
  • Video game persuasion is related to teen sexuality because it confuses the minds of younger audiences as to how women should dress and act.
  • Something that must be considered in regards to media research is music. Music is listened to for a large portion of the day—in movies, television shows, iPods, and at work.
  • An example that can be taken from this are the two most common genres in music—heavy metal and rap music. Both genres have been put into the spot light and scrutinized because of lyrics, video preference, and choice of dress.
  • Given the in-depth and valid reasons we can state with assurance that there is a positive correlation between media and adolescent sexuality but the research cannot simply stop there. Preventive methods must also be researched.
  • The need for more educational classes to be part of a regular school curriculum to impede these sexual actions learned would be form of prevention methods
  • Given the statistics that establish a link between overly sexual behavior and sexually explicit media more research needs to done as to why this is happening, other than the obvious facts that youth are more impressionable.
  • Media, Youth, & Sexuality

    1. 1. Tonya Foore Advanced General Psychology PSY492 UB
    2. 2.  The media has a personal responsibility in the over sexual youth, leading to risky behavior and teen pregnancy. Children and young adults who are exposed to over sexual media (which includes music, television programs, and video games) are at risk for being overly sexual and/or teen pregnancy.
    3. 3. 1.
    4. 4.  Berry (2008) stated data was taken from a national longitudinal survey of teens (12–17 years of age, monitored to 15–20 years of age) was used to assess whether exposure to televised sexual content predicted subsequent pregnancy for girls or responsibility for pregnancy for boys (2008).
    5. 5.  Brown’s research (2006) tracked over time whether exposure to sexual content in four mass media outlets (which included television, movies, music, and magazines) used by early adolescents predicts sexual behavior in middle adolescence.
    6. 6.  The results of Brown’s research stated white adolescents in the top quintile of sexual media diet when 12 to 14 years old were 2.2 times more likely to have had sexual intercourse when 14 to 16 years old than those who were in the lowest SMD quintile, even after a number of other relevant factors, including baseline sexual behavior, were introduced (2006).
    7. 7. 2.
    8. 8.  The article states that female video game characters are more likely than male characters to be portrayed as sexualized (60% versus 1%), scantily clad (39% versus 8%) and as showing a mix of sex and aggression (39 versus 1%).
    9. 9.  An example of a selected audience being sexualized is the cult favorite Grant Theft Auto, all versions. Grand Theft Auto (GTA) depicted a man, usually a gangster, who drives around the city stealing car, running from cops, going to strip clubs, and running over pedestrians. There are strip clubs to visit and on the most graphic GTA games a player can pick up a prostitute.
    10. 10.  Adolescents can spend nearly equal amounts of time listening to the radio, although music is used frequently as an accompaniment to other activities (Donnersteing & Strasburger, 1999). 3
    11. 11.  The Parents' Music Resource Center, a nonprofit group organized to address the issue of lyrics that "glorified graphic sex and violence and glamorized the use of drugs and alcohol," distributed an information packet that included a list of recent releases with graphic, violent, and explicit lyrics. Almost all of the songs listed are by heavy metal or rap groups (Took & Weiss, 1994).
    12. 12.  E.W. Austin conducted research with conclusions that can confidently show what media literacy has promise as part of a sex education program by providing adolescents with a cognitive framework necessary to understand and resist the influence of media on their decision making concerning sex (2008).
    13. 13.  Austin performed a posttest-only quasi- experiment with control groups was conducted at 22 school and community sites in Washington state (N = 532) (2008). The intervention, a 5-lesson media literacy curriculum targeted primarily to middle school students, encouraged sexual abstinence because of federal government funding requirements (3020). Adolescents evaluated the program positively, with 85% rating it as better than other sex education programs (2010)
    14. 14.  Shows can be monitored and tracked, channels banned, and time watched recorded. A parent or guardian can simply use these tools to help monitor the amount of influence television shows have over their children. The same can be applied to Internet use. Blocking pop- ups and monitoring Internet use will also help in prevention of sexually explicit materials.
    15. 15. What would be the intention of research into the subject, without researching ways to inhibit the actions?  A call for more cognitive behavioral research is being made, hopefully with concluding results that will decelerate the sexually destructive behaviors.  A call must also be made for more preventive research methods
    16. 16.  With this research parents, guardians, teachers, and peers will hopefully take into deliberation the amount of media that is being exposed and can hopefully avoid sexually explicit media leading to risky sexual behavior.
    17. 17.  Austin, E.W. et al. (2008). Effects of a Peer-Led Media Literacy Curriculum on Adolescents' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Sexual Behavior and Media Portrayals of Sex. In Health Communication, 23(5), 462 – 472. Retrieved September 11, 2010 from http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a903406797.  Berry, S.H. et al. (2008). Does Watching Sex on Television Predict Teen Pregnancy? Findings From a National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. In PEDIATRICS, 122(5), 1047-1054.doi:10.1542/peds.2007-3066. Retrieved on September 8, 2010 from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/122/5/1047?submit.y=1 7&submit.x=93&submit=sendit&gca=122%2F5%2F1047&.  Brown, J.D. et al. (2006). Sexy Media Matter: Exposure to Sexual Content in Music, Movies, Television, and Magazines Predicts Black and White Adolescents' Sexual Behavior. In Pediatrics, 117 (4), 1018-1027. doi:10.1542/peds.2005-1406. Retrieved September 11, 2010 from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/117/4/1018 ?linkType=FULL&journalCode=pediatrics&resid=117/4/1018.
    18. 18.  Dill, K. & Thill, K. (2007). Video Game Characters and the Socialization of Gender Roles: Young People’s Perceptions Mirror Sexist Media Depictions. In Sex Roles,57(11-12), 851- 864. DOI: 10.1007/s11199-007-9278-1. Retrieved September 11, 2010 from http://www.springerlink.com/content/d7667776258nt866/.  Donnersteing, E. & Strasburger V. (1999). Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Issues and Solutions. In Pediatrics, 103(1) 129- 139. Retrieved September 10, 2010 from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/extract/103/1/1 29.  Took K.J. & Weiss, D.S. (1994). The Relationship Between Heavy Metal & Rap Music on Adolescent Turmoil: Real or Artifact? In Adolescence, 29. Retrieved September 29, 2010 from http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst;jsessionid= MvHT2h1cLqdqnnMvl9jjLMbvny9STJrKpVSk6DfbBwN bQ3xvsbfD!743654339!-1689544633?docId=5000287943.

    ×