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Why do translators
have healthier brains?
ABILITY TO SPEAK TWO OR MORE
LANGUAGES opens up opportunities
...that are not possible for those
who are
monolingual.
Research has shown that those who are
bilingual may actually have other advantages
over those who aren’t.
A study from the University of
Edinburgh has examined the
impact of bilingualism on
cognitive aging and found that
learnin...
Further research is required in order to
understand why this is
whether it is the increased mental stimulation
of knowing two languages that slows down
cognitive decline, or
whether it is simply that those with high cognitive
performance are more likely to acquire a second language
in the first ...
Bialystock’s research also showed that bilingualism
had a marked effect on fighting the onset of
Alzheimer’s disease..
“Being bilingual
has certain cognitive benefits
and boosts the performance of the brain,
especially one of the most import...
She conducted a study looking at 211 individuals with
Alzheimer’s, which found that those who were bilingual
had been diag...
The
bilingual cohort
had also reported
the onset of
symptoms
5.1 years later
than
their
monolingual
counterparts.
Judith Kroll,
a Penn State University psychologist,
sums up the relationship between
bilingualism and cognitive function.
“The important thing that we
have found is that both
languages are open for
bilinguals. In other words,
there are alternat...
“The bilingual is somehow
able to negotiate between
the competition of the
languages. The speculation is
that these cognit...
Read the full article here!
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Why Do Translators Have Healthier Brains?

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Being able to speak two languages is a fantastic skill to have as anyone can agree. Now we learning from recent research that those who are bilingual may actually have other advantages over those who aren’t.

Published in: Science
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Why Do Translators Have Healthier Brains?

  1. 1. Why do translators have healthier brains?
  2. 2. ABILITY TO SPEAK TWO OR MORE LANGUAGES opens up opportunities
  3. 3. ...that are not possible for those who are monolingual.
  4. 4. Research has shown that those who are bilingual may actually have other advantages over those who aren’t.
  5. 5. A study from the University of Edinburgh has examined the impact of bilingualism on cognitive aging and found that learning a second language may slow down the decline.
  6. 6. Further research is required in order to understand why this is
  7. 7. whether it is the increased mental stimulation of knowing two languages that slows down cognitive decline, or
  8. 8. whether it is simply that those with high cognitive performance are more likely to acquire a second language in the first place.
  9. 9. Bialystock’s research also showed that bilingualism had a marked effect on fighting the onset of Alzheimer’s disease..
  10. 10. “Being bilingual has certain cognitive benefits and boosts the performance of the brain, especially one of the most important areas known as the executive control system.” Ellen Bialystock Toronto’s York University Cognitive Development Lab
  11. 11. She conducted a study looking at 211 individuals with Alzheimer’s, which found that those who were bilingual had been diagnosed on average 4.3 years later than those who were monolingual.
  12. 12. The bilingual cohort had also reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than their monolingual counterparts.
  13. 13. Judith Kroll, a Penn State University psychologist, sums up the relationship between bilingualism and cognitive function.
  14. 14. “The important thing that we have found is that both languages are open for bilinguals. In other words, there are alternatives available in both languages. Even though language choices may be on the tip of their tongue, bilinguals rarely make a wrong choice. ” Judith Kroll, a Penn State University psychologist
  15. 15. “The bilingual is somehow able to negotiate between the competition of the languages. The speculation is that these cognitive skills come from this juggling of languages.” Judith Kroll, a Penn State University psychologist
  16. 16. Read the full article here!

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