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Qualys user group presentation - vulnerability management - November 2009 v1 3

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Qualys user group presentation - vulnerability management - November 2009 v1 3

  1. 1. 1 Vulnerability management – 3i’s journey Tom King tom.king@3i.com A presentation to: Qualys Security Conference November 2009 www.3i.com
  2. 2. 2 Contents Vulnerability management About 3i Our journey – the eras of vulnerability management Challenges & gotchas Benefits Conclusions
  3. 3. 3 About 3i 3i plc – the company • A world leader in private equity • Focus on buyouts, growth capital, infrastructure • €8.5 billion assets under management, with offices in 12 countries 3i plc – IT • Serving all internal users (circa 750 users) • Very high expectations of “IT service” • Largely a Microsoft house, try to avoid bleeding edge technologies 3i plc – Information security • Small security team (two), operational security with other teams • Good synergy with other internal teams, e.g. Compliance, Risk • Use ISO 27001/2 as backbone of InfoSec program
  4. 4. 4 The eras of vulnerability management
  5. 5. 5 First era – ad-hoc and reactive First era – ad-hoc and reactive • Little clarity on threats, vulnerabilities, risks • Reactive approach • Annual penetration test against external IP’s? • Widespread media attention around a malware threat, e.g Nimda • Main focus on network perimeter – keep the bad guys/ stuff out • Number of threats and vulnerabilities were snowballing exponentially..
  6. 6. 6 Second era – Microsoft patching Second era – Microsoft patching • “Monster” worms were continuing to hit companies – not 3i! • Blaster – global cost (lost/ productivity) - $1.3 billion • SQL slammer – infected most vulnerable hosts on the Internet in minutes not hours • Anti-virus helped but was not a panacea – often did not prevent an infection • Important defensive measure was to ensure timely application of Microsoft patches • Simple edict from CIO – apply all relevant Microsoft patches.. • Geared up processes and technology to deal with “Patch Tuesday” • Started to track and report missing patches
  7. 7. 7 Third era – external vulnerability scanning Third era – external vulnerability scanning • Some pressure from auditors to deploy intrusion detection • Personal view – great as a burglar alarm, but has challenges.. • Proposed a different direction – improved vulnerability management • “Let’s find our weak spots, and fix them”. How simple!  • Purchased a well-known SaaS vulnerability scanning solution • Only scanned Internet-accessible machines – web servers, mail servers, remote access etc. • Simple KPI and incident process agreed with IT management • Monitoring, trending, reporting
  8. 8. 8 Fourth era – internal vulnerability scanning Fourth era – internal vulnerability scanning • Extended SaaS solution to scan machines on internal network • Great to see what the real picture is, but.. • Huge number of vulnerabilities found • Herculean task to make any improvement • Gartner advocate dealing with “high severity” vulnerabilities first, still difficult! • Ad-hoc pressure from security team to fix certain vulnerabilities • E.g. on critical machines, on machines with sensitive data • Monitoring, trending, reporting
  9. 9. 9 Fifth era – risk view of vulnerabilities Fifth era – risk view of vulnerabilities • Using a simple risk framework • Risk = threat * vulnerability * asset value • Makes much more sense of vulnerability data, e.g • Does it matter if a machine has vulnerabilities if its asset value is low? • If a machine is in a hostile environment and is valuable, any significant vulnerability is a big issue.. • Tracking over time, monthly reporting to IT management team • Gives a more meaningful view of the issue – allows better prioritisation of remediation resource.
  10. 10. 10 Vulnerability reporting – through the eras Vulnerability reporting – through the eras • Ad-hoc/ reactive – little reporting, maybe detailed technical pen-tests • Microsoft patching – some more detailed data, difficult to see what is important (and why) • External vulnerabilty scanning – useful focus on Internet-facing vulnerabilities. Simple KPI & incident response process worked well • Internal vulnerability scanning – whoah! Information overload.. • E.g. scanning 300 machines, each machine has a vulnerability report of ~150 A4 pages! • Focus initially on critical vulnerabilities per “service” • Risk view of vulnerabilities – simple RAG table.. Microsoft Patching Index 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Date Financial Systems Investment Systems EU Desktop - Citrix, data etc Messaging EU Workstations EU Laptops AP Servers USA Servers AP Clients All machines Potential and confirmed vulnerabilities on Internet-facing machines 0 2 4 6 8 10 Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Date Numberofvulnerabilities Confirmed severity 5 Confirmed severity 4 Potential severity 5 Potential severity 4 Critical vulnerabilities index per service 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Date Group systems Investment systems EU Servers Messaging Network EU Workstations EU Laptops
  11. 11. 11 Vulnerability management – monthly KPI’s Security KPI’s – reported monthly • Monthly security management pack produced • 13 KPI’s (cost, resourcing, malware, security incidents, policy compliance, Microsoft patches, vulnerability scanning etc.)
  12. 12. 12 Benefits – vulnerability management Benefits • Finally getting a holistic view of vulnerabilities • Across entire estate – internal & external machines • Not just focussed on Microsoft vulnerabilities • Risk focussed – threat, vulnerability asset value all considered • KPI’s and reporting shaping into something useful • Can determine what issues to address, in what order • Secondary benefits emerging – e.g. machine comparison • Journey has not ended • Not enough visibility on (web) application level vulnerabilities • Need to address medium risk areas – aim for all green
  13. 13. 13 Challenges and gotchas – vulnerability management Challenges and gotchas Challenge What we’ve done Sheer number of vulnerabilities Risk view to help prioritise False +ve’s Very infrequent, but YMMV Disruption of live services Generally not an issue, with smart timing and low intensity scans Timely remediation Risk view helps. Defined and agreed response process helps Vulnerability landscape changes frequently Frequent scans
  14. 14. 14 Questions/ Answers/ Discussion Questions/ Answers/ Discussion

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