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Giving and receiving feedback

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Giving and receiving feedback

  1. 1. Giving and ReceivingGiving and Receiving FeedbackFeedback Todd M. GrivettiTodd M. Grivetti MSN, RN, CCRN, CNMLMSN, RN, CCRN, CNML President/CEO Level V, Inc.President/CEO Level V, Inc.
  2. 2. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Objectives:Objectives:  Understand the concept of feedbackUnderstand the concept of feedback  Identify how to ask for and give feedbackIdentify how to ask for and give feedback  Discuss how feedback is useful in developing teamsDiscuss how feedback is useful in developing teams
  3. 3. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Definition:Definition:  FeedbackFeedback describes the situation when output fromdescribes the situation when output from (or(or informationinformation about the result of) an event orabout the result of) an event or phenomenon in the past will influence an occurrencephenomenon in the past will influence an occurrence or occurrences of the same (i.e. same defined)or occurrences of the same (i.e. same defined) event / phenomenon (or the continuation /event / phenomenon (or the continuation / development of the original phenomenon) in thedevelopment of the original phenomenon) in the present or future. When an event is part of a chainpresent or future. When an event is part of a chain of cause-and-effect that forms a circuit or loop, thenof cause-and-effect that forms a circuit or loop, then the event is said tothe event is said to "feed back""feed back" into itself.into itself.
  4. 4. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Why to Give and Receive?Why to Give and Receive?  Additional way of gaining insight about your ownAdditional way of gaining insight about your own practice and to validate your point of view.practice and to validate your point of view.  Should be a learning and growth opportunity vs.Should be a learning and growth opportunity vs. punitive or negative.punitive or negative.
  5. 5. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Feedback can be conducted three waysFeedback can be conducted three ways  Asking for FeedbackAsking for Feedback  Receiving FeedbackReceiving Feedback  Giving FeedbackGiving Feedback
  6. 6. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Asking for FeedbackAsking for Feedback  Select a peer who’s opinion you respect and whoseSelect a peer who’s opinion you respect and whose judgment you trust.judgment you trust.  Choose someone who is in a similar role as you.Choose someone who is in a similar role as you.  Alternatively, you could choose someone who youAlternatively, you could choose someone who you work closely with who is not in the same role.work closely with who is not in the same role.
  7. 7. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  What to do:What to do:  Prepare the information you want to discuss with yourPrepare the information you want to discuss with your peer/colleague.peer/colleague.  Select a time and place without distractions for yourSelect a time and place without distractions for your conversationconversation  Briefly indicate what you would like to cover and why it’sBriefly indicate what you would like to cover and why it’s important to youimportant to you  Discuss and review some of your practice experiencesDiscuss and review some of your practice experiences  Be specific about your abilities, strengths, and areas forBe specific about your abilities, strengths, and areas for growth, learning and enhancementgrowth, learning and enhancement
  8. 8. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Receiving FeedbackReceiving Feedback  There is no point in asking others to give youThere is no point in asking others to give you feedback unless you are prepared to be open to itfeedback unless you are prepared to be open to it and consider the comments which differ from yourand consider the comments which differ from your own perceptions.own perceptions.
  9. 9. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Characteristics of Receiving FeedbackCharacteristics of Receiving Feedback  Be ExplicitBe Explicit  Make it clear what kind of feedback you are seeking.Make it clear what kind of feedback you are seeking.  If necessary, indicate what kinds you do not want to receive.If necessary, indicate what kinds you do not want to receive.  Feedback from others in entirely for your benefit and if you do not indicateFeedback from others in entirely for your benefit and if you do not indicate what you want, you may not receive it.what you want, you may not receive it.  Be AttentiveBe Attentive  Take time to listen, understand and consider what is being said by rephrasingTake time to listen, understand and consider what is being said by rephrasing and being interested in the other person’s point of view.and being interested in the other person’s point of view.  Ask questions and be curious about how your peer sees you.Ask questions and be curious about how your peer sees you.  Ask for suggestions on how to enhance your practice and grow professionally.Ask for suggestions on how to enhance your practice and grow professionally.  Two questions you may want to keep in mind when asking for peer feedback:Two questions you may want to keep in mind when asking for peer feedback:  What do I do best?What do I do best?  Is there some aspect of my practice I can improve?Is there some aspect of my practice I can improve?
  10. 10. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Be AwareBe Aware  Notice your own reactions, both intellectual and emotional.Notice your own reactions, both intellectual and emotional.  Be aware of any reactions of rejections or censorship on your partBe aware of any reactions of rejections or censorship on your part  Be SilentBe Silent  Refrain from making a responseRefrain from making a response  Don’t even begin to frame a response in your own mind until you haveDon’t even begin to frame a response in your own mind until you have listened carefully to what has been said and have considered thelistened carefully to what has been said and have considered the implications.implications.  Do not use the excuse of correcting factual errors to avoid hearing andDo not use the excuse of correcting factual errors to avoid hearing and resonating with the substance of what has been saidresonating with the substance of what has been said  Don’t be distracted by the need to explainDon’t be distracted by the need to explain  If you feel you have provide an explanation, do it later after the feedbackIf you feel you have provide an explanation, do it later after the feedback session.session.
  11. 11. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Giving Feedback:Giving Feedback:  Check your reasons for accepting the invitation toCheck your reasons for accepting the invitation to give feedback.give feedback.  Make sure you are clear on what your peer is askingMake sure you are clear on what your peer is asking for by restating the request in your own words.for by restating the request in your own words.
  12. 12. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Giving feedback Characteristics:Giving feedback Characteristics:  Be RealisticBe Realistic  Direct your comments toward matters on which they can act.Direct your comments toward matters on which they can act.  Direct your feedback toward what is specifically asked for to meetDirect your feedback toward what is specifically asked for to meet your peers’ needs.your peers’ needs.  Although your peer requested feedback, be attentive to feelings andAlthough your peer requested feedback, be attentive to feelings and non-verbal cues by each of you.non-verbal cues by each of you.  Be SpecificBe Specific  Generalizations are particularly unhelpful.Generalizations are particularly unhelpful.  Base your comments and feedback on concrete observable behaviorBase your comments and feedback on concrete observable behavior or materials.or materials.  Be supportive and constructive in your comments.Be supportive and constructive in your comments.
  13. 13. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Be Sensitive to the goals of the personBe Sensitive to the goals of the person  Just because the other person’s contributions haveJust because the other person’s contributions have not met your goals, does not necessarily implynot met your goals, does not necessarily imply something is wrong.something is wrong.  Be thoughtful in your comments and tone.Be thoughtful in your comments and tone.  Listen to what they have to sayListen to what they have to say  Be TimelyBe Timely  Provide time for exchange of comments to create anProvide time for exchange of comments to create an opportunity for validating and exploring practiceopportunity for validating and exploring practice strengths, needs and ideas.strengths, needs and ideas.
  14. 14. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Be DescriptiveBe Descriptive  Describe your viewsDescribe your views  Don’t be evaluative or say what the person should be feelingDon’t be evaluative or say what the person should be feeling  Don’t be emotionally manipulativeDon’t be emotionally manipulative  Be Consciously non-judgmentalBe Consciously non-judgmental  Offer your personal viewOffer your personal view  Do not act as an authority, even if you may be one elsewhereDo not act as an authority, even if you may be one elsewhere  Give your personal reactions and feelings rather than value-Give your personal reactions and feelings rather than value- laden statements by using:laden statements by using:  ““I feel…..”I feel…..”  ““When you….”When you….”
  15. 15. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Don’t CompareDon’t Compare  Treat each person’s work as their own, not some part of aTreat each person’s work as their own, not some part of a competition with others.competition with others.  Be cautious about giving feedback in a context in whichBe cautious about giving feedback in a context in which comments you give may be compared to another.comments you give may be compared to another.  Be DiligentBe Diligent  Check your responsesCheck your responses  Is it an accurate reflection of what you want to express?Is it an accurate reflection of what you want to express?  Have you perceived the contribution accurately?Have you perceived the contribution accurately?  Nothing is more annoying than to receive feedback from someoneNothing is more annoying than to receive feedback from someone who clearly hasn’t bothered to pay attention to what you have done.who clearly hasn’t bothered to pay attention to what you have done.
  16. 16. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Be DirectBe Direct  Say what you meanSay what you mean  Don’t wrap it up with fancy words or abstractDon’t wrap it up with fancy words or abstract language.language.  Be PositiveBe Positive  Say what you appreciate. Don’t focus on what youSay what you appreciate. Don’t focus on what you react negatively towards.react negatively towards.  Find something that is genuinely felt, rather thanFind something that is genuinely felt, rather than being positive because you feel it is required.being positive because you feel it is required.
  17. 17. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback  Be AwareBe Aware  Note your own emotional state before givingNote your own emotional state before giving feedbackfeedback  Being anxious or defensive may distort your ownBeing anxious or defensive may distort your own commentscomments  Feedback is never the time to relieve yourself at theFeedback is never the time to relieve yourself at the expense of the other personexpense of the other person  Move to focus on the person to whom you are relatingMove to focus on the person to whom you are relating and their needs, not yourself by responding in any way.and their needs, not yourself by responding in any way.
  18. 18. Giving and Receiving FeedbackGiving and Receiving Feedback ReferencesReferences Boud, D. (1991). Implementing Student Self Assessment. HERDSABoud, D. (1991). Implementing Student Self Assessment. HERDSA Green guide No. 5. 2Green guide No. 5. 2ndnd Ed. Retrieved Oct. 15, 2010 from,Ed. Retrieved Oct. 15, 2010 from, http://www.iml.uts.edu.au/assessment-futures/glossary/Giving-http://www.iml.uts.edu.au/assessment-futures/glossary/Giving- and-Receiving-Feedback.pdfand-Receiving-Feedback.pdf College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia. (2006).College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia. (2006). PeerPeer Feedback: Learning from Each Other. Retrieved October 15, 2010 from,Feedback: Learning from Each Other. Retrieved October 15, 2010 from, http://www.iml.uts.edu.au/assessment-futures/glossary/Giving-http://www.iml.uts.edu.au/assessment-futures/glossary/Giving- and-Receiving-Feedback.pdfand-Receiving-Feedback.pdf Horstman, M., Auzenne, M. (2006).Horstman, M., Auzenne, M. (2006). The Peer Feedback Model.The Peer Feedback Model. Manager Tools Podcast. Retrieved October 22, 2006 from.Manager Tools Podcast. Retrieved October 22, 2006 from. http://www.manager-tools.com/2006/10/the-peer-feedback-http://www.manager-tools.com/2006/10/the-peer-feedback- modelmodel

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