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Men's views on gender diversity in the workplace 092016

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Men's views on gender diversity in the workplace 092016

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Men's views on gender diversity in the workplace 092016

  1. 1. CONFIDENTIAL 1CONFIDENTIAL 1 Men in the Workplace An in-depth exploration of what men think of gender diversity in the workplace Fairygodboss and Artemis Connection September 20, 2016
  2. 2. CONFIDENTIAL 2 Executive summary • This summer, Fairygodboss, an online career community for women, and Artemis Connection, a consultancy that focuses on aligning strategy and team, were pondering a few important facts: • American corporations have recently instituted many changes to help promote gender diversity, including everything from diversity targets, enhanced maternity leave and bias training to flying nannies. • Conventional wisdom says that corporate change is best driven from the top down (see John Kotter, Professor of Leadership at Harvard Business School) • Nearly half of women on Fairygodboss say that women are not treated equally in their workplace • 33% of women on Fairygodboss say their experience “depends on the manager,” which suggests that CEO initiatives are necessary but not sufficient • Managers are disproportionately male, so to make companies more gender diverse, we will have to change the behavior of managers • We dove into research and found the MARC project at Catalyst, but not much else. Our questions were: Do men think gender diversity in general is an issue? Is it an issue at their workplace? What do men think the barriers are? Do managers perceive different barriers than nonmanagers? This exploration was designed to clarifying these questions and add insight into the attitudes of men in the workplace, uncovering their motivations, hopes and concerns for the future of women in the workplace. • So how to change the behavior of male managers? • To answer this question, we surveyed over 300 U.S. full-time working men. Our survey was not random, nor was it intended to be. Most men were mid-to-late career and in a variety of industries including hi-tech and finance. We followed up with 31 interviews.
  3. 3. CONFIDENTIAL 3 Here’s what we learned • “It’s a problem, just not where I work.” While a full one-third of men think women are treated unfairly in the workplace in general, just 10 percent of respondents agree that women are treated unfairly in their workplace. In other words, the men we spoke to don’t believe that gender bias happens in their own backyard. 10% 33% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% "Women are treated unfairly in my workplace" "Women are treated unfairly in the workplace"
  4. 4. CONFIDENTIAL 4 • “Diversity is a culture issue. There is no gender wage gap.” When asked what challenges women faced at work, men pointed toward an overall feeling of inclusion as the single biggest issue (by over 50 percent of respondents). Non- managers were more likely to cite mentorship (or lack thereof) and work/ life balance. • “I want to help, but it’s kind of awkward.” Less than half of men say they have advocated for equality, inclusion, and diversity publicly. A full one-fifth, however, admitted that they have not acted as an ally. More of what we learned
  5. 5. CONFIDENTIAL 5 • Financial benefits • A recent Gallup study found that hiring a demographically diverse workforce can improve a company's financial performance.1 • Team Performance • Gender-diverse teams perform better than single-gender teams.1 • Strong Leadership • Women outperform men on numerous leadership competencies.2 • Retention • Greater diversity is related to lower intent to leave.2 Why does gender diversity matter?
  6. 6. CONFIDENTIAL 6 What can we do about this? • Get the facts: It would be powerful to run this survey at the company level, comparing women’s experiences with men’s perspectives on these experiences and illuminating the gaps. In fact, companies should undertake this exercise of their own; the disparate results for women and men could serve as a provocative springboard for discussion. Even looking at engagement surveys on a more granular level could be impactful. Are there differences in what men and women say? What is happening at the middle manager level? • Have honest conversations: In the absence of a comparative survey, men should simply ask their female colleagues, and especially their female direct reports, about the barriers they face at work and how to work together to overcome them. Men might be surprised by not only the variety of proposed solutions but also the rank-ordering of them. They may find, for example, that one woman simply wants a clearer path to promotion, while another wants to work from home one day a week. • Lead and hold people accountable: Leaders drive culture, decide what metrics matter, and model what is expected. A commitment from the top to building a diverse, inclusive workplace is not enough—managers must be held accountable. • Train managers: Managers truly matter. Research out of Stanford highlights when people are assigned to better bosses, they are less likely to leave the firm. The first year as a manager is key for developing skills and habits. It is best if the training is on-the-job, not a carve out or webinar that is easy to forget or deem irrelevant. • Do, learn, iterate: Finally, at an organization level, companies should continue to experiment with different approaches, or at least dialogues, to pinpoint their firms’ unique gender-related strengths and challenges. Organizations around the world follow in Google’s footsteps: if you were to apply their philosophy here, you would be data driven in regards to diversity and human capital while concurrently realizing that people and human interactions are unpredictable. Despite the mixed effectiveness of these activities, learning and experimenting with new approaches to improve women’s inclusion at work, and men’s active participation in these efforts, is vital to achieving a better workforce.
  7. 7. CONFIDENTIAL 7 Meet Artemis Connection & Fairygodboss • Progressive leaders come to Artemis Connection for relevant research and actionable advice on aligning strategy and teams for execution. Diversity is an important part of leveraging the power of those teams. • Drawing from their experience in management consulting, education, start-ups, and Fortune 100 corporations, the Artemis Connection team offers insights and tips to leaders from around the world through professional development, seminars, and an upcoming blog series. • In addition, Artemis Connection provides consulting and research services to private, public, nonprofit, and government organizations seeking to better understand gender diversity in their workplace. • Fairygodboss is a career and job community for women. Our mission is to improve the workplace for women by creating transparency. On our site, women review their jobs and companies and share advice with each other. We also crowdsource key information like maternity leave policies. Contact information • Artemis Connection: Our website + like us on Facebook + link to us in LinkedIn + follow us on twitter + email us at connect@artemisconnection.com • Fairygodboss: Our site is: www.fairygodboss.com. We are Fairygodboss on Facebook and @fairygodboss on twitter and instagram. email us at info@fairygodboss.com Meet the founders Christy Johnson Christy is the founder of Artemis Connection. Prior to that, she led several corporate operations and strategy teams. She was also an engagement manager at McKinsey & Co and an award winning high school math / economics teacher. She holds and MBA and a MA in Education from Stanford University. She is the proud mama of a 6 ½ year old girl and twin two-year old boys Georgene Huang Georgene Huang is CEO and co-founder of Fairygodboss. She previously led the Enterprise business and product development team at Dow Jones. Earlier in her career, she was a private equity and hedge fund investment analyst. She holds a degree in Economics from Cornell University, and a J.D. from Stanford. Georgene is a proud mother of two, and believes in the ability of information to create positive change. Romy Newman Romy Newman was formerly Head of Digital Advertising for The Wall Street Journal. She previously held marketing positions at Google and Estee Lauder, and was a media strategy consultant. Romy graduated with a B.A. in American Studies from Yale University and an M.B.A. from Kellogg. She is a proud mother of two, and looks forward to helping other women have the same fantastic career experiences – supported by both great female and male colleagues - that she has had.
  8. 8. CONFIDENTIAL 8 Survey Overview Methodology: • Online survey • Follow up interviews with 31 male leaders • Survey in the field from July 28-August 8, 2016 Sample: • N= 327, male only, 91.04% living in the US • 95.75% Employed full-time • 43.57% in technology, 11.07% in finance • Income: • 7.02% 0-50k • 19.29% 50-100k • 29.47% 100-150k • 20.01% 150-200k, • 23.5% > 200k • Mix of managers and non-managers • Age: • 18-29 (18%) • 30-44 (65%) • 45-59 (12%) • 60+ (5%) Objectives: • To better understand the male perspective of gender issues in the workplace, including their experiences and opinions on: • Working with women • Bias or harassment • Maternity leave • Paternity leave • Proposed solutions to inequality • To understand the demographic of the sample including: • Type of occupation, yearly income • % of women in their workplace • Marital status, spousal employment status • Contributions to childcare, housework
  9. 9. CONFIDENTIAL 9 Amongst study participants, there appears to be a gender imbalance in the workplace • 90 percent have colleagues that are women • Of those who manage people, 73 percent have women reporting to them • 27 percent of participants report to a woman • Nearly all participants (89 percent) work for a male CEO • 42 percent have just 25 percent or fewer women in the company they work for • Most top management (C-level executives) are male 8% 34% 41% 18% About what percentage of your overall workplace is women? Less than 10% Between 10% to 25% Between 25% to 50% More than 50% 49% 22% 22% 7% About what percentage of your top management is women?1 Less than 10% Between 10% and 25% Between 25% and 50% More than 50% 42% N=318 N=313
  10. 10. CONFIDENTIAL 10 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 3% 1% 1% 0% 3% 4% 30% 28% 23% 21% 47% 39% 44% 69% 76% 76% 47% 56% 23% I enjoy working with women I feel comfortable working with women I think women add a lot to the workplace Women are easy to work with I know what to say to the women I work with in social situations Women are treated fairly in the workplace N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Amongst managers, nearly all believe women add a lot to the workplace and enjoy working with them. However, just 67 percent believe that women are treated fairly in the workplace Total Agree = 67% Total Agree = 95% Total Agree = 94% Total Agree = 97% Total Agree = 99% Total Agree = 97% N=135
  11. 11. CONFIDENTIAL 11 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 5% 0% 0% 1% 3% 6% 29% 26% 26% 19% 37% 51% 46% 71% 73% 75% 57% 41% 18% I enjoy working with women I feel comfortable working with women I think women add a lot to the workplace Women are easy to work with I know what to say to the women I work with in social situations Women are treated fairly in the workplace N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Non-managers responded similarly, with just 64 percent agreeing that women are treated fairly in the workplace Total Agree = 64% Total Agree = 92% Total Agree = 94% Total Agree = 94% Total Agree = 98% Total Agree = 97% N=120
  12. 12. CONFIDENTIAL 12 1% 4% 6% 1% 9% 1% 0% 21% 38% 36% 21% 33% 9% 43% 41% 44% 40% 50% 51% 26% 15% 18% 29% 13% 39% 6% 1% 1% 1% 2% Women are treated fairly in my workplace There is gender bias in my workplace Sexual harassment occurs in my workplace Male colleagues speak about female colleagues in an inappropriate or sexual manner when women are not present I often wonder whether women in my workplace will come back from maternity leave I assume women with children work less N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree While 32 percent of managers agree that there is gender bias in their workplace, 90 percent agree that women are treated fairly in their workplace Total Agree = 30% Total Agree = 15% Total Agree = 19% Total Agree = 16% Total Agree = 32% Total Agree = 90% N=135
  13. 13. CONFIDENTIAL 13 1% 6% 7% 1% 9% 1% 14% 32% 43% 33% 38% 14% 40% 44% 41% 43% 53% 51% 37% 18% 12% 10% 9% 33% 3% 4% 4% 1% Women are treated fairly in my workplace There is gender bias in my workplace Sexual harassment occurs in my workplace Male colleagues speak about female colleagues in an inappropriate or sexual manner when women are not present I often wonder whether women in my workplace will come back from maternity leave I assume women with children work less N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Amongst non-managers, we see a similar trend with 40 percent believing there to be a gender bias, while 84 percent believe women are treated fairly in their workplace Total Agree = 14% Total Agree = 10% Total Agree = 16% Total Agree = 18% Total Agree = 40% Total Agree = 84% N=120
  14. 14. CONFIDENTIAL 14 Managers perceive top challenges for women around work/life balance, inclusion, mentoring and childcare. Non-managers believe inclusion is the biggest challenge 19% 11% 24% 23% 25% 26% 23% 52% 23% 14% 19% 21% 22% 24% 33% 34% 37% 37% Harassment Flexible work options Other (please explain) Promotion timelines Compensation Childcare Mentorship Overall feelings of inclusion Work/life balance What challenges do women face more than men at your workplace, if any? (select all that apply) Managers Non-Managers Managers, N=135 Non-Managers, N=120
  15. 15. CONFIDENTIAL 15 Both managers and non-managers point to better treatment/ culture with managers focused on increased flexibility and non- managers point to fairer standards/evaluation 7% 23% 38% 49% 38% 54% 26% 6% 21% 31% 36% 36% 40% 42% Shorter hours Nothing else needs to be done Higher pay Fairer standards / evaluation More promotions Better treatment / culture More flexibility What do you think can be done to support women more in your workplace? (select all that apply) Managers Non-Managers Managers, N=135 Non-Managers, N=120
  16. 16. CONFIDENTIAL 16 Most believe it is important to fix the problems women face in the workplace How important is it to you to fix these problems that women face in the workplace? 56%30% 10% 4% Managers Very Important Somewhat Important Somewhat Unimportant Very Unimportant 61% 31% 4% 4% Non-Managers Very Important Somewhat Important Somewhat Unimportant Very Unimportant Managers, N=135 Non-Managers, N=120
  17. 17. CONFIDENTIAL 17 Respondents who thought women faced problems in the workplace suggested a number of reasons why they want change Diverse ideas, whether that's race, gender, or just perspective leads to more innovative ideas. Because women in the workplace adds value to business and provides unique perspective. Diversity gives us diversity of perspective, which is a force-multiplier. It is the right thing to do. It is strategically critical to our ability to compete for skilled employees of all backgrounds, genders, etc. For me, it's an issue of fundamental fairness. Gender should have nothing to do with how people are treated or compensated in the workplace. I want my daughters to join a workforce that will value what they contribute. I want my son to value the contributions of others. [The] better women feel about our company the more talent options we have to increase the strength of our workforce. Women can contribute just as much, if not more than men in the workplace. We should strive to make them want to work with us. Can't be successful of 1/2 our employees are not treated fairly. Also want a better future for my daughter. Diverse experiences and mindsets offer value that can't otherwise be captured. An inclusive and diverse workplace is more productive, creative and valuable one. Level playing field is best for business. Diversity of perspectives creates a stronger workplace, and a stronger society. Mono cultures breed stagnation and loss. It's tough to keep a team functioning well when members of it feel like their contributions are not being as valued or compensated. Women have different needs than men. Any place that hires women has a responsibility to recognize that. Women are about 50% of the population and if they don't want to work where I work, we miss a lot of the talent pool. I have daughters in the workplace and don't want them to have to deal with gender inequality, especially in regrard [sic] to pay equality. Because I've worked for and with strong, intelligent women my whole professional life and know what their influence can mean. As a white male I don't have visibility into women being treated unfairly, but if they are it is important that it be addressed. Managers Non-Managers
  18. 18. CONFIDENTIAL 18 However, some did not think there were any problems women faced in the workplace They don't exist. Because I don't see the problem in my workplace. I don't think there is a problem that needs to be addressed. It assumes there's an issue to fix. That's not the case. Relatively minor issues they face at my workplace (i.e. social issues that don't affect workplace success). Not a major issue at my company. I feel like women are treated fairly. It's not an issue in my workplace. At my workplace, I don't feel like we have inequality issues at all. Women are fairly represented and face no different issues than men in my workplace. Not a huge problem as far as I know. There are other higher priority issues such as actual work issues. Don’t see it. I don't perceive the problem. Don't see it as a major institutional problem. Managers Non-Managers
  19. 19. CONFIDENTIAL 19 Managers are more likely to advocate for equality, inclusion and diversity than non-managers. Just 29 percent of surveyed men have met with a woman in the workplace to discuss these topics 28% 8% 14% 29% 33% 54% 16% 19% 27% 29% 50% 53% I have not acted as an ally Other (please explain) Identified cases of inequality or lack of diversity and worked to fixed them Met with women in your workplace to discuss equality, inclusion and diversity Publicly advocated for equality, inclusion and diversity Privately advocated for equality, inclusion and diversity In what ways have you been an ally to advancing women’s inclusion at work, and addressing challenges that women often face at work? (Select all that apply) Manager Non-Manager Managers, N=135 Non-Managers, N=120
  20. 20. CONFIDENTIAL 20 Reviews are mixed on current gender diversity initiatives or training at work. Managers are less likely to view them as helpful than non-managers Have you found gender diversity initiatives or training at work helpful? 31% 24%4% 41% Managers Yes No I have not participated in the above because I chose not to I have not participated in the above because it is not offered in my workplace 40% 20% 7% 33% Non-Managers Yes No I have not participated in the above because I chose not to I have not participated in the above because it is not offered in my workplace Managers, N=135 Non-Managers, N=120
  21. 21. CONFIDENTIAL 21CONFIDENTIAL 21 Interview Responses
  22. 22. CONFIDENTIAL 22 Qualitative interview responses provided similar themes to the same questions as the online survey, with a few interesting points N = 52 • Having women involved early on and focusing on diversity makes a huge difference in shaping a more equitable environment • “Women have been involved since the formation of the company which is why some things like childcare centers with Patagonia employees running them is just done, even if the business case isn't there.” – Patagonia employee • Men do not appreciate the cliques that happen in the workplace amongst men (e.g. being a bro), but they feel like they need to participate • Human sustainable workplaces, such as where people work fewer hours, are focused on results rather than politicking, or everyone has flexibility, tend to have more gender equity
  23. 23. CONFIDENTIAL 23CONFIDENTIAL 23 Appendix
  24. 24. CONFIDENTIAL 24CONFIDENTIAL 24 Combined Manager/Non-Manager Data Cut
  25. 25. CONFIDENTIAL 25 Most disagree that women have more flexibility than men with their schedules. However, for this question, managers are slightly more likely to agree than non-managers 21% 17% 18% 60% 54% 47% 13% 25% 32% 4% My workplace allows me to spend adequate time with friends and family My organization allows me to have flexible hours or work from home At my organization, women have more flexibility with their schedules than men N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Managers 9% 25% 6% 7% 58% 38% 29% 7% 54% 59% Non-Managers Total Agree = 9%Total Agree = 17% Total Agree = 79% Total Agree = 79% Total Agree = 92% Total Agree = 88% Managers, N=135 Non-Managers, N=120
  26. 26. CONFIDENTIAL 26 While a large majority believe women add to the workplace and they enjoy working with women, just 65 percent believe women are treated fairly in the workplace 4% 1% 0% 0% 3% 5% 28% 28% 25% 21% 41% 44% 44% 68% 73% 73% 51% 48% 21% I enjoy working with women I feel comfortable working with women I think women add a lot to the workplace Women are easy to work with I know what to say to the women I work with in social situations Women are treated fairly in the workplace N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Total Agree = 65% Total Agree = 92% Total Agree = 92% Total Agree = 94% Total Agree = 98% Total Agree = 96% N=299
  27. 27. CONFIDENTIAL 27 While 86 percent of participants agree women are treated fairly in their workplace (compared to 65 percent when asked generally), a third believe there is a gender bias in their workplace 3% 5% 6% 2% 9% 1% 0% 19% 35% 39% 26% 34% 11% 42% 43% 43% 43% 51% 51% 30% 15% 14% 19% 11% 35% 5% 2% 3% Women are treated fairly in my workplace There is gender bias in my workplace Sexual harassment occurs in my workplace Male colleagues speak about female colleagues in an inappropriate or sexual manner when women are not present I often wonder whether women in my workplace will come back from maternity leave I assume women with children work less N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Total Agree = 22% Total Agree = 12% Total Agree = 16% Total Agree = 15% Total Agree = 35% Total Agree = 86% N=280
  28. 28. CONFIDENTIAL 28 Inclusion and work/life balance are seen as the biggest challenges faced by women in the workplace. Childcare and mentorship are also seen as challenges while compensation and promotion timeliness are slightly less important 15% 16% 23% 23% 24% 29% 29% 31% 43% Flexible work options Harassment Promotion timelines Other (please explain) Compensation Mentorship Childcare Work/life balance Overall feelings of inclusion What challenges do women face more than men at your workplace, if any? (select all that apply) N=267
  29. 29. CONFIDENTIAL 29 Culture and fair standards are pointed to as being key to supporting women, more so than promotions or higher pay 6% 23% 33% 34% 36% 43% 47% Shorter hours Nothing else needs to be done Higher pay More flexibility More promotions Fairer standards / evaluation Better treatment / culture What do you think can be done to support women more in your workplace? (select all that apply) N=289
  30. 30. CONFIDENTIAL 30 Most feel they have a flexible work environment and have adequate time with family and friends. Just 12 percent believe that women have more flexibility than men 2% 3% 21% 12% 12% 58% 45% 38% 9% 38% 45% 3% My workplace allows me to spend adequate time with friends and family My organization allows me to have flexible hours or work from home At my organization, women have more flexibility with their schedules than men N/A Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Total Agree = 83% Total Agree = 83% N=275
  31. 31. CONFIDENTIAL 31 Most believe it is important to fix the problems women face in the workplace 58% 30% 8% 4% How important is it to you to fix these problems that women face in the workplace? Very Important Somewhat Important Somewhat Unimportant Very Unimportant N=262
  32. 32. CONFIDENTIAL 32 More participants have privately advocated for equality, inclusion and diversity than publicly. A third of participants have actively met with women to discuss these issues 14% 20% 21% 29% 41% 53% Other (please explain) Identified cases of inequality or lack of diversity and worked to fixed them I have not acted as an ally Met with women in your workplace to discuss equality, inclusion and diversity Publicly advocated for equality, inclusion and diversity Privately advocated for equality, inclusion and diversity In what ways have you been an ally to advancing women’s inclusion at work, and addressing challenges that women often face at work? (Select all that apply) N=262
  33. 33. CONFIDENTIAL 33 Reviews are mixed on current gender diversity initiatives or training at work 35% 23% 6% 37% Have you found gender diversity initiatives or training at work helpful? Yes No I have not participated in the above because I chose not to I have not participated in the above because it is not offered in my workplace N=269
  34. 34. CONFIDENTIAL 34CONFIDENTIAL 34 Paternity Leave and Work/Life Balance
  35. 35. CONFIDENTIAL 35 Most participants work at a company that offers paternity leave and would or did take a paternity leave 71% 29% Does your company offer paternity leave? Yes No 88% 12% Did or would you take it? Yes No N=271 N=193
  36. 36. CONFIDENTIAL 36 19% 41% 39% 2% At home, how do you feel your contributions to housework compare to your spouse or partner? I contribute more I contribute about the same I contribute less N/A Amongst those living with a spouse or partner, 56 percent say their spouses/partners work fewer hours or do not work out of the home. 41 percent believe they contribute about the same as their spouse or partner while 39 percent contribute less N=204 N=204 10% 19% 19% 13% 37% 1% 2% Does your spouse or partner work out of the home? If so, do they work: More hours than you About the same hours as you Fewer hours than you N/A They don't work out of the home I don't have a spouse or partner Other (please explain)
  37. 37. CONFIDENTIAL 37 21 percent of participants with children say their spouse/partner works the same hours, while 25 percent believe they work less. Just 7 percent say that their spouse/partner works more hours N=101 7% 21% 25% 12% 33% 0% 3% Does your spouse or partner work out of the home? If so, do they work: More hours than you About the same hours as you Fewer hours than you N/A They don't work out of the home I don't have a spouse or partner Other (please explain)
  38. 38. CONFIDENTIAL 38 15% 40% 46% 0% At home, how do you feel your contributions to housework compare to your spouse or partner? I contribute more I contribute about the same I contribute less N/A Married or co-habitating fathers with children say they contribute to housework about the same or less than their spouse/partner and 59 percent contribute less to childcare than their spouse/partner N=101; Right hand question is only those with children 11% 28% 59% 2% At home, how do you feel your contributions to childcare compare to your spouse or partner? I contribute more I contribute about the same I contribute less N/A
  39. 39. CONFIDENTIAL 39CONFIDENTIAL 39 Other Interesting Findings
  40. 40. CONFIDENTIAL 40 When looking at the responses from those that provided contact information, we found these men tend to be far more aware of gender/diversity issues and more active in trying to solve them N = 52 • Far more likely to agree that women face more challenges than men in the workplace. • Just one says that it is NOT important to fix these issues. • 43 percent disagree that women are treated fairly in the workplace, compared with 32 percent of the total sample. • 56 percent believe there is gender bias in their workplace, compared with 35 percent of total sample. • 20 percent say sexual harassment occurs in their workplace, compared with 15 percent of total sample. • When asked both about what challenges women face, as well as what solutions there may be, we see very similar results in terms of the “ranking” of these challenges/solutions. However, we see each challenge/solution to be more pronounced (~10 percent + more per challenge/solution). • 72 percent believe it is very important to fix these problems (vs. 58 percent), and 22 percent say it is somewhat important (vs. 30 percent ). • More likely than the total sample to have been an ally to advancing women’s inclusion in the work and addressing challenges that women face at work. • Near even split of managers/non-managers (55 percent /45 percent ).
  41. 41. CONFIDENTIAL 41CONFIDENTIAL 41 Demographic Data
  42. 42. CONFIDENTIAL 42 What is your approximate income?*94% of participants are salaried employees. 1% 4% 6% 14% 13% 17% 13% 8% 23% $0-$24,999 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000-$124,999 $125,000-$149,999 $150,000-$174,999 $175,000-$199,999 $200,000 and up N=254
  43. 43. CONFIDENTIAL 43 How many people do you manage at work? 47% 22% 13% 19% 0 - I don't manage anyone I manage 1 to 3 direct reports I manage 4 to 6 direct reports I manage 7 or more direct reports N=255
  44. 44. CONFIDENTIAL 44 Which of the following describes the principal industry of your organization? Advertising & Marketing, 8% Agriculture, 0% Airlines & Aerospace (including Defense), 2% Automotive, 0% Business Support & Logistics, 4% Construction, Machinery, and Homes, 3% Education, 3% Entertainment & Leisure, 4% Finance & Financial Services, 11% Food & Beverages, 1% Government, 2% Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals, 4%Insurance, 1% Manufacturing, 3% Nonprofit, 4% Retail & Consumer Durables, 4% Real Estate, 0% Telecommunications, Technology, Internet & Electronics, 43% Transportation & Delivery, 0% Utilities, Energy, and Extraction, 1% I am currently not employed, 0% N=250
  45. 45. CONFIDENTIAL 45 Which of the following best describes your current occupation? Management Occupations, 17% Business and Financial Operations Occupations, 11% Computer and Mathematical Occupations, 26% Architecture and Engineering Occupations, 8% Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations, 1% Community and Social Service Occupations, 2% Legal Occupations, 5% Education, Training, and Library Occupations, 2% Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations, 6% Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations, 0% Healthcare Support Occupations, 1% Protective Service Occupations, 0% Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations, 0% Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations, 0% Personal Care and Service Occupations, 0% Sales and Related Occupations, 12% Office and Administrative Support Occupations, 0% Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations, 0% Construction and Extraction Occupations, 1% Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations, 0% Production Occupations, 0% Transportation and Materials Moving Occupations, 0% Other (please specify), 8% N=252
  46. 46. CONFIDENTIAL 46 Nearly 70 percent of participants are married 69%0% 2% 0% 2% 9% 17% Which of the following best describes your current relationship status? Married Widowed Divorced Separated In a domestic partnership or civil union Single, but cohabiting with a significant other Single, never married 42% 58.0% Do you have any children under 18? Yes No N=252 N=255

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