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Book now at www.innovation-forum.co.uk/deforestation-singapore or call +44 (0) 20 3780 7434
LEAD SPONSORS:
MEDIA PARTNERS:...
As everyone from the Pentagon to the Pope has seemingly
acknowledged climate disruption as a cause for significant
concern...
deforestation, especially in the EU. In 2012 alone, the report
found, the EU imported $6.5bn worth of illegally sourced be...
At the same time modern mapping and other technologies
are increasingly enabling the tracking and verification of
deforest...
•	 Focused debate
•	 Senior participants
•	 Candid dialogue
DayOne:Monday28thSeptember2015
Welcome and opening remarks
Bre...
Breakout groups
Breakout one
Smallholder farmers and
rural development – a multi-
stakeholder approach.
Partnerships to de...
Debate
Can certification schemes ever deliver sustainable forestry?
If they can, why it hasn’t happened? If they can’t, wh...
Brand attitudes to sustainable sourcing:
What does it take to convince them to buy again
from companies they have de-liste...
Land rights, land use policies, use of mapping and
monitoring
Most sustainability standards and zero deforestation pledges...
Conferenceobjectives
•	 To explain why deforestation is one of the top business issues in the next decade
•	 To analyse th...
Howbusinesscan
tackledeforestation
AmakeorbreakissueforAsia’s
corporatereputation?
28th-29thSeptember2015 | Singapore
UPCO...
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How business can tackle deforestation – A make or break issue for Asia’s corporate reputation

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Innovation Forum will be hosting the ‘how business can tackle deforestation – A make or break issue for Asia’s corporate reputation?’ conference in Singapore on 28-29 September 2015.

Speakers include senior representatives from Unilever, APP, Wilmar, Cargill, UBS, Musim Mas, Mars, Neste Oil, WWF, Forest Peoples Programme, and many more leading brands and influential NGOs.

They’ll be discussing their views on best practice and latest trends, along with what’s on the horizon beyond 2016 targets.

You can register at: http://www.innovation-forum.co.uk./deforestation-singapore-registration.php. Alternatively, get in touch with Innovation Forum directly – charlenne.ordonez@innovation-forum.co.uk

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How business can tackle deforestation – A make or break issue for Asia’s corporate reputation

  1. 1. Book now at www.innovation-forum.co.uk/deforestation-singapore or call +44 (0) 20 3780 7434 LEAD SPONSORS: MEDIA PARTNERS: www.innovation-forum.co.uk/deforestation-singapore Hearfromthese leadingexperts: Howbusinesscan tackledeforestation AmakeorbreakissueforAsia’s corporatereputation? 28th-29thSeptember2015 | Singapore  Investors assessment of sustainability activities – Hear from investors how they value the sustainability policies in portfolio companies  Smallholder farmers and rural development – Find out what different stakeholders are doing to increase productivity, creating equitable opportunities for smallholder farmers and improving rural livelihoods  Integrated landscape management – Learn how integrated landscape management can help develop security of supply  The legal risks of not knowing your supply chain – The latest trends and what they mean for business  How business is responding – Hear how leading firms are putting targets into action  Beyond certification – In-depth critical analysis of certification’s limits, and how to go beyond them  Leverage supplier engagement – Learn how to communicate with and incentivise your suppliers for improved traceability Biswaranjan Sen Vice President Procurement Unilever Aida Greenbury Managing Director, Sustainability AsiaPulp&PaperGroup Brendan May Chairman Robertsbridge Simon Lord Executive Vice President, Group Sustainability and Quality Management SimeDarby Bruce Blakeman Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Asia-Pacific Cargill Ambassador Stig Traavik Norwegian Ambassador to ASEAN RoyalNorwegianEmbassy Jeremy Goon Chief Sustainability Officer WilmarInternational Petra Meekers Director of CSR and Sustainable Development MusimMas Nina Roth Environmental and Social Risk Manager UBS Jeanne Stampe Asia Finance and Commodities Specialist WWFInternational Three things you will get from this conference: Focused sessions – discuss the issues that matter to you and your peers Senior participants – business leaders, key NGOs, investors, research experts and government Candid dialogue – open discussion between companies about their experiences and off the record challenges 1 2 3
  2. 2. As everyone from the Pentagon to the Pope has seemingly acknowledged climate disruption as a cause for significant concern, the role of deforestation in the climate crisis is in focus. Big business and brands, and their role in reducing deforestation is getting more attention than ever. The other destructive impacts of deforestation on pollution and natural ecosystems are also gaining more attention. An international accord on combating climate change may be on the cards when the 21st Congress of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change meets in Paris in December. And it is more likely than ever to include a set of commitments by countries to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation now that negotiators meeting in Bonn recently agreed to a draft REDD+ deal. A forest protection scheme of that magnitude not only includes mechanisms for reducing the direct causes of deforestation, but also for guaranteeing the rights of indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities, conserving habitat for rare and endangered wildlife, and preserving so-called “ecosystem services”. The way we do business faces many challenges, none more pressing than the need to drastically reduce deforestation worldwide. Big business can meet this challenge head-on – indeed, many companies already are. But it is a complex issue that requires consideration of several factors. Carbonsink Forests are an important global carbon sink, which means that deforestation incurs a lost opportunity cost in terms of emissions that won’t be sequestered by, say, a clearcut forest, in addition to the direct emissions caused by the deforestation in the first place. Researchers with the University of Edinburgh recently reported that, were it not for destruction at the hands of man, the Amazon would store 12% more carbon in its vegetation. That translates to a net deficit of somewhere between seven and eight billion metric tonnes of carbon in the Amazon’s above- ground biomass – and the researchers didn’t even factor in the carbon stored in the forest’s soil, so the deficit is likely higher. Thelegalityproblem With forests’ contribution to mitigating climate change clear, negotiations around the REDD+ scheme for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation are proceeding apace. But a climate treaty alone won’t get the job done. Forest Trends has found that as much as half of all global deforestation for commercial agriculture in the past 15 years was done illegally, and it’s not clear how much of that illicit forest destruction a climate accord can rein in. Some of Forest Trend’s other findings are alarming. In Brazil, the group found that up to 90% of deforestation could have been illegal within the past 15 years, mostly forest cleared for cattle ranches and soy plantations. And some 80% of land conversion in Indonesia is estimated to have been done illegally, with oil palm plantations and timber harvesting operations encroaching further and further into the rainforest. A recent report from Brussels-based environmental organisation Fern points to the need for far stronger policies to reduce the trade in agricultural commodities derived from illegal Cuttingdeforestation–thebig challengeforbusiness Howtoreallytackledeforestationisfinallycomingintofocus –andbigcompaniesaretakingonthesustainabilitychallenges andtheriskstotheirlong-termsurvival
  3. 3. deforestation, especially in the EU. In 2012 alone, the report found, the EU imported $6.5bn worth of illegally sourced beef, leather, palm oil and soy – nearly one-quarter of all global trade in these commodities, representing some 2.4m hectares of forest illegally cleared. A number of the EU’s policies are driving illicit land conversion, the report’s authors say – despite the EU Timber Regulation. To truly halt deforestation, policies are required to curb illegal logging alongside whatever mechanisms climate negotiators might adopt for protecting forests. Activistaction The concern around deforestation’s role in climate change is just one of many motivating factors behind pressure campaigns launched by activists against companies and governments accused of forest destruction. A wide range of industries and regulatory bodies have come under fire in recent years. WWF says that every two seconds an area of forest the size of a football pitch is clearcut by illegal loggers somewhere in the world, and the illegal timber trade accounts for 30% of the global market. That’s led to more than 50% of tropical deforestation in central Africa, the Amazon and southeast Asia. Groups such as Canopy and the Rainforest Action Network have had campaigns targeting fashion companies, calling on them to join H&M, Levis Strauss, Marks & Spencer and a host of other companies in adopting supply chain safeguards. These can make sure that wood cellulose fabrics, such as Rayon, used in consumer products, aren’t connected to deforestation and human rights abuses. Greenpeace, TFT and the Rainforest Alliance are also playing vitally important roles in forest value measurement and conservation across the world. Agricultureconcerns Industrial agriculture – from cattle ranches to palm and soy plantations – continues to be the subject of numerous campaigns. Groups are also calling out what they see as false solutions to climate change that are impacting forests – or at least not producing meaningful conservation results. Some groups have targeted biofuels, for instance, while many conservationists are concerned that a major new threat to tropical forests has emerged in the form of hydroelectric dams. Much of the dam-building activity in the coming decades is expected to take place in tropical river basins including the Amazon, Congo and Mekong, and they’re being proposed as sustainable development projects. Critics of those plans say they will not only wipe out millions of hectares of forest, but that the climate impacts are being drastically underestimated. Corporateleaders Many companies have already stepped up and committed to doing their part by eradicating deforestation from their supply chains or business operations, including, most recently, 3M and APRIL. And governments are beginning to catch up – Indonesia’s renewed moratorium on new palm oil concessions is welcome, if criticised by activists for a lack of real teeth.
  4. 4. At the same time modern mapping and other technologies are increasingly enabling the tracking and verification of deforestation – and what companies are doing to stop it. The reality is that deforestation is a risk to corporate reputation as much as to human health and the environment. But which corporate policies are truly sustainable solutions to reducing deforestation? Is zero deforestation possible, and how do companies go about it? These, and many others, are the sort of questions we will be posing and answering in September at Innovation Forum’s next deforestation conference. We’re bringing together a select group of companies, NGOs and other experts to debate how business can work with NGO partners, governments and other key stakeholders to help prevent deforestation. The event will cover the latest trends in regulation and enforcement, but will also be a hands-on, practical conference, with controlled attendance so that the right people to drive change are in the room. We hope you can join us. Support independent debate and progress Innovation Forum is looking for a small number of partners to work with and push forward the anti-deforestation agenda. The conference, along with our publishing of analysis and briefings on the subject, provide the perfect platform to promote debate, innovation and action to remove deforestation from the corporate supply chain. Three key reasons why to sponsor this executive conference: 1. Promote innovation and action amongst a room filled with business executives and decision-makers. 2. Highlight your work in front of industry media, practitioners, government and thought leaders. 3. Build relationships with key organisations to help promote the concept and develop business for your own organisation. Speakersinclude: • AdrianSuharto, sustainability and public affairs manager, NesteOil • AidaGreenbury, managing director, sustainability, AsiaPulp&Paper • AmbassadorStigTraavik, Norwegian ambassador to ASEAN, RoyalNorwegianEmbassy • BrendanMay, chairman, Robertsbridge • BruceBlakeman, vice president, corporate affairs, Asia-Pacific, Cargill • ConstantvanAerschot, executive director, BusinessCouncilforSustainable DevelopmentSingapore • DariusSarshar, director, investments and operations, NewForestsAsia • DharsonoHartono, CEO, RimbaMakmurUtama • BiswaranjanSen, vice president procurement, Unilever • DrMarcusColchester, senior policy advisor, ForestPeoplesProgramme • FitrianArdiansyah, Indonesia country director, IDH–TheSustainable TradeInitiative • GabrielThoumi, senior sustainability analyst, CalvertInvestments • IainHenderson, REDD+ and sustainable land use, UNEPFinanceInitiative • JeanneStampe, Asia finance and commodities specialist, WWFInternational • JeremyGoon, chief sustainability officer, WilmarInternational • JohanVerburg, senior advisor programme development and private sector engagement in agribusiness, OxfamNovib • KavitaPrakash-Mani, executive director, GrowAsia • NinaRoth, environmental and social risk manager, UBS • LafcadioCortesi, Asia director, RainforestActionNetwork • PetraMeekers, director of CSR and sustainable development, MusimMas • PetrusGunarso, conservation director, AsiaPacificResources InternationalLimited–APRIL • AnitaNeville, Australia and Oceania representative, RainforestAlliance • RuslanKrisno, Agrigroup sustainability director, GreatGiantPineapple • ScottPoynton, executive director, TFT • SimonLord, executive vice president group sustainability and quality management, SimeDarby • VemundOlsen, senior policy adviser, RainforestFoundationNorway • SimonSiburat, general manager group sustainability, WilmarInternational • NurdianaDarus, executive director, IndonesiaPalmOilPledge • Anne-SophieGindroz, facilitator for southeast Asia, RightsandResourcesInitiative • CalenMay-Tobin, lead analyst and policy advocate, tropical forest and climate initiative, UnionofConcernedScientists • DrSimonTay, chairman, SingaporeInstituteof InternationalAffairs • ChristopherSamuel, director – corporate affairs, Monsanto • AlistairMonument, Asia Pacific regional director, ForestStewardshipCouncil • GrantRosoman, interimchairofHCSA steeringgroup, HighCarbonStockApproach • YueyueWang, globalchocolatesustainable sourcinginsightmanager, Mars • ErikMeijaard, coordinator, BorneoFuturesInitiative • BustarMaitar, head of global network of Indonesia forest campaign, Greenpeace
  5. 5. • Focused debate • Senior participants • Candid dialogue DayOne:Monday28thSeptember2015 Welcome and opening remarks Brendan May, chairman, Robertsbridge Tobias Webb, founder, InnovationForum Keynote International cooperation – ASEAN agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution Indonesia formally ratified the ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze in 2014, the last country to do so. And then in May 2015, Indonesia’s moratorium on palm oil concessions was renewed. What are governments doing to work together to counter deforestation? And how much do these recent developments reflect a willingness on Indonesia’s part to engage and cooperate with other regional governments to tackle the haze problem, and its roots in slash and burn deforestation? Dr Simon Tay, chairman, SingaporeInstituteofInternationalAffairs Indonesia palm oil pledge – the road to deforestation-free palm oil. Will it really make a difference? In September 2014, at the UN climate summit in New York, Wilmar, Golden Agri-Resources, Cargill and Asian Agri – four of Indonesia’s largest palm oil producers – alongside the Indonesia Chamber of Commerce (Kadin), signed a landmark commitment to further efforts to eliminate deforestation and peatland destruction in Indonesia. The companies reaffirmed their commitments to eliminate deforestation in their supply chains. In this session we will debate what the pledge means in practice. We’ll ask our expert panel to explain whether it really is a game- changing agreement. Bruce Blakeman, vice president corporate affairs, Asia-Pacific, Cargill Nurdiana Darus, executive director, IndonesiaPalmOilPledge Bustar Maitar, head of global network of Indonesia forest campaign, Greenpeace Commentary by: Ambassador Stig Traavik, Norwegian ambassador to ASEAN, RoyalNorwegianEmbassy Moderator: Jeremy Goon, chief sustainability officer, WilmarInternational Impact of sustainability strategy on markets, market access and how/whether investors value sustainability activities There is a growing concern amongst investors to minimise their risks of financing potentially socially and environmentally damaging projects. Norway’s Government Pension Fund Global, for example, has expectations for its portfolio companies to reduce deforestation and forest degradation in their operations and supply chains. In this session we will ask our panellists their views on: • the role of regulation in terms of disclosure on deforestation impact. • how to stimulate greater investor engagement in Asian companies, especially consumer goods companies that have not committed to deforestation-free supply chains – thus far most of the engagement has been focused on international brands. • the extent that investors understand the real impact on access to markets on their portfolio companies – or is there still a view that India, China and Indonesia continue to be a dumping ground for unsustainable commodities and deforestation. Darius Sarshar, director, investments and operations, NewForestsAsia Gabriel Thoumi, senior sustainability analyst, CalvertInvestments Vemund Olsen, senior policy adviser, RainforestFoundationNorway Iain Henderson, REDD+ and sustainable land use, UNEPFinance Initiative Commentary by: Jeanne Stampe, Asia finance and commodities specialist, WWFInternational Case study: Deforestation's causes and rates of destruction – separating fact from fiction There is much ambiguity about the rates of deforestation and especially the direct and ultimate causes. Different industries have been blamed over the years for causing most deforestation, but rarely has data been available to substantiate these claims. On the basis of long-term studies on Borneo this session will present new insights into these issues to support the debate about causes of and possible solutions to loss and degradation of tropical forests. Erik Meijaard coordinates the Borneo Futures initiative, a science- based programme that aims to inform policymakers and the public about the possible future for Borneo and the short- and long-term social, economic and environmental impacts and consequences of different choices and actions. Erik Meijaard, coordinator, BorneoFuturesInitiative
  6. 6. Breakout groups Breakout one Smallholder farmers and rural development – a multi- stakeholder approach. Partnerships to develop alternative zero-deforestation livelihoods Growing population and price instability in international markets are putting pressure on global food security. Climate change and land-use conversion to bio- fuels are leading to less availability of arable land and water for food crops. This means that the world will need to produce more food using fewer environmental resources. The two billion people who live and work on small farms in developing countries have an enormous potential to increase food production. At the same time they can improve their lives and contribute to greater food security for all. But how to help them develop? Innovative multistakeholder collaboration is crucial. In this breakout session we will hear what different stakeholders are doing to safeguard sustainable land use and increase productivity while creating equitable opportunities for smallholder farmers and improving rural livelihoods. Kavita Prakash-Mani, executive director, GrowAsia Ruslan Krisno, Agrigroup sustainability director, GreatGiantPineapple Petra Meekers, director of CSR and sustainable development, MusimMas Fitrian Ardiansyah, Indonesia country director, IDH–TheSustainableTradeInitiative Breakout two Reconciling forest protection with development needs The current level of development of industrialised societies has been achieved to a considerable extent by deforestation. But continued deforestation and ruthless exploitation is no longer an option. Instead governments, companies and civil society must encourage long-term forest conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. In this session Dharsono Hartono CEO of PT Rimba Makmur Utama, an Indonesian based company developing a 110,000 hectare peat-land forest REDD+ project in central Kalimantan and Johan Verburg from Oxfam Novib, will talk about the social and economic benefits of forest protection and restoration. Dharsono Hartono, CEO, RimbaMakmur Utama Johan Verburg, senior advisor programme development and private sector engagement in agribusiness, OxfamNovib Breakout three High carbon stock approach – toolkit In recent years several companies – many of them multinationals with supply chains that span the globe – have announced their commitments to removed deforestation form their operation and supply change. However, the lack of a consensus in the definitions of forest and deforestation make it challenging to monitor and verify progress towards meeting deforestation-free commitments. The HCS Approach Toolkit: No Deforestation in Practice was launched in April 2015. The toolkit provides guidance for producers on how to identify high carbon stock forests and integrate them with other land use planning approaches such as high conservation value areas, the protection of peat-lands, and respect for the rights of indigenous and traditional communities to their lands. In this session we will discuss how the toolkit offers a practical way to achieve no deforestation together with recognition of community land rights. We will ask the value to suppliers from reporting on deforestation and how they can make a significant impact on the ground in assessing forested areas. Dr Marcus Colchester, senior policy advisor, ForestPeoplesProgramme Calen May-Tobin, lead analyst and policy advocate, tropical forest and climate initiative, UnionofConcernedScientists Grant Rosoman, interim chair of HCSA steering group, HighCarbonStockApproach DayOne:Monday28thSeptember2015
  7. 7. Debate Can certification schemes ever deliver sustainable forestry? If they can, why it hasn’t happened? If they can’t, what other tools do we need? Certification has been a useful tool for companies and brands that are beginning to tackle their deforestation impacts. But as we move to the next stage of tackling how to preserve and protect our forests – in ways that make sense for all stakeholders, including business – we need to ask if they would ever be able to deliver or if they have become a major part of the problem. In a quick fire debate-based session, we will discuss what certification has achieved and what may be the next step forward. Scott Poynton, executive director, TFT Simon Lord, executive vice president group sustainability and quality management, SimeDarby Alistair Monument, Asia Pacific regional director, ForestStewardshipCouncil Investor commentary by: Nina Roth, environmental and social risk manager, UBS DayOne:Monday28thSeptember2015 Downloadourreportsforfree The management briefings that complement our deforestation conferences are the result of extensive cross-industry research with the leading experts in the field. Written by expert contributors, the reports cover in detail the current state of play in the industry as well as assessing and analysing the practical steps companies can take, and the challenges/ opportunities that will result. The reports are useful tools themselves, but also work well to set the scene for discussion at this and other conferences. For more information contact charlenne.ordonez@innovation-forum.co.uk
  8. 8. Brand attitudes to sustainable sourcing: What does it take to convince them to buy again from companies they have de-listed? One of many drivers for producers and suppliers of pulp, paper, palm oil and many other commodities to embed sustainability into operations has been brand purchasing pressure. In this keynote Q&A session we’ll ask Dhaval Buch, chief procurement officer at Unilever, to discuss how his company, which buys 2% of global palm oil, considers bringing back companies into the supply chain that were previously excluded for sustainability reasons. Biswaranjan Sen, vice president procurement, Unilever DayTwo:Tuesday29thSeptember2015 Is there a role for business in supporting institutional capacity building? Government enforcement, and particularly the capacity to enforce and the systems to support laws, is a key issue for sustainable forestry. Yet in so many countries there is a lack of capacity, sometimes coupled with national, regional or local political will. As more and more governments start to see the value of their natural forests, is there a role for business in helping them deliver against capacity challenges? We’ll ask some leading players for their views on whether business can ever go beyond just “good lobbying”. Ambassador Stig Traavik, Norwegian ambassador to ASEAN, Royal NorwegianEmbassy Simon Lord, executive vice president group sustainability and quality management, SimeDarby Aida Greenbury, managing director, sustainability, AsiaPulp&Paper Constant van Aerschot, executive director, BusinessCouncil forSustainableDevelopmentSingapore Breakout groups – case studies Breakout one Implementing social commitments – towards a road map for strengthening social license in the pulp, paper and palm sectors In Indonesia, some 44% of palm oil is produced by smallholder farmers. And with the bulldozers switched off by many large companies in the region now much deforestation comes from smallholders. A major factor is land ownership and operations and the frameworks and laws surrounding that. Companies are in many cases becoming key players in these conflicts, which can take place on or around their concession land. For both palm oil and pulp and paper companies, what’s a responsible way to approach these conflicts? In particular, what kind of resources and time frames do companies need to apply to resolve such matters and make sure the requirements of free prior and informed consent are adhered to? Petra Meekers, director of CSR and sustainable development, MusimMas Lafcadio Cortesi, Asia director, RainforestActionNetwork Anne-Sophie Gindroz, facilitator for southeast Asia, RightsandResourcesInitiative Breakout two Buyer perspective – engaging emerging market suppliers Engaging with emerging market suppliers has long since been one of the key challenges in building a sustainable, deforestation- free supply chain. In this session we’ll discuss how companies can engage with their suppliers through a combination of education and incentivisation, to ensure policy is being implemented on the ground. We will ask how the big buying companies are developing the right incentives for their smallholder suppliers so that they don’t simply clear more land to grow more crops. Adrian Suharto, sustainability and public affairs manager, NesteOil Yueyue Wang, global chocolate sustainable sourcing insight manager, Mars
  9. 9. Land rights, land use policies, use of mapping and monitoring Most sustainability standards and zero deforestation pledges include commitments to respect the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities to their lands, aligning them with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Participatory mapping allows companies to understand current systems of land use, avoid land conflicts and helps communities plan a future where they benefit from investment without forfeiting local food security and cultural integrity. Many companies that acquired lands in the past without community consent, now face entrenched land conflicts. Community mapping and renegotiated land use plans can chart the path to reconciliation. This helps companies avoid long term litigation and loss of income. In Malaysian Borneo, the courts are clogged with hundreds of land disputes. In Indonesia, the National Land Bureau estimates there are some 4,000 land conflicts in the palm oil sector alone. In this breakout session Dr Marcus Colchester will outline the key challenges their organisations have encountered, and some of the best solutions to them. Dr Marcus Colchester, senior policy adviser, ForestPeoplesProgramme Integrated landscape management and restoration commitments – what will they mean for business policy and practices? As more and more companies and brands move towards no deforestation commitments, practical and scalable methods of achieving this are being developed through cooperation between business and NGOs. Now, high conservation value and high carbon stock approaches are being combined with the principles of free, prior and informed consent, and other social rights, in the concept of integrated landscape management. In this moderated session, we will ask experts for their insight and analysis of what an integrated landscape management policy means for business, and how this is a tool in developing properly sustainable security of supply across value chains. We will also examine restoration commitments – APP has committed to restore one million hectares in ten distinct areas, for example. We will discuss what those restoration commitments will look like on the ground, and how long they will take to make a difference. Aida Greenbury, managing director, sustainability, AsiaPulp&Paper Dharsono Hartono, CEO, RimbaMakmurUtama Petrus Gunarso, conservation director, AsiaPacificResources InternationalLimited–APRIL Moderator: Jeremy Goon, chief sustainability officer, WilmarInternational Breakout three Supplier perspective – understanding on the ground challenges Corporate policies and NGO pressure is all very well. But it is the suppliers who have to implement and manage a policy of eliminating deforestation. Here we’ll ask key experts in supply chain engagement to discuss opportunities and challenges in working with suppliers to improve sustainability performance on the ground. Simon Siburat, general manager group sustainability, WilmarInternational Anita Neville, Australia and Oceania representative, RainforestAlliance DayTwo:Tuesday29thSeptember2015
  10. 10. Conferenceobjectives • To explain why deforestation is one of the top business issues in the next decade • To analyse the latest trends, campaigns and what business is currently doing to tackle deforestation • To explain how to design and implement better anti-deforestation policies and practices • To showcase and debate current best practice in removing deforestation from corporate supply chains • To highlight the partnerships that help deliver best practice • To understand the regulatory environment around legality and sustainable forestry Keyquestionsyou maybeasking 2 3 4 ?? Who will be in the room? Attending will be 150 senior professionals representing large corporations from corporate responsibility, sustainability and supply chain job functions. We’re also bringing together the NGOs that can help you make a real difference. We’re actively restricting the number of service providers to ensure a minimum of 80% of attendees are corporate practitioners and key NGOs to ensure the conference delivers maximum value – and maximum action. Is it just another talking shop? Will there be outcomes? The conference has been specifically designed to promote action by providing the practical tools necessary to implement zero deforestation targets. By bringing together an intimate group of corporate practitioners, the conference provides a strong platform for delegates to take away actionable insight that can be implemented from the first day back on the office. The conference will be an annual event. Our regularly published briefings reflect progress and highlight areas for effective action. Isn’t deforestation just about palm oil? Palm oil is a major issue that has seen significant media attention in recent years. But palm oil is far from the sole cause of deforestation. With pulp and paper, packaging, clothing and trading companies all committing to zero deforestation targets, it’s evident that the issue of deforestation is a far reaching one. Illegal logging practices, highlighted by campaigners for decades, have long been a major cause of deforestation before palm oil became such a dominant issue. Today, leading apparel brands such as H&M and Inditex are also making no deforestation commitments. This event is designed for any sector or industry serious about removing deforestation footprints from its value chain. Why will this event be different from others? Innovation Forum has a clear philosophy – focused events, senior participants and candid dialogue. By bringing together highly experienced practitioners around such a focused topic, we are able to get to the core of the challenges and opportunities for companies in this space. The agenda is designed to be interactive and engaging so the issues discussed are those that matter to you and your peers.
  11. 11. Howbusinesscan tackledeforestation AmakeorbreakissueforAsia’s corporatereputation? 28th-29thSeptember2015 | Singapore UPCOMING EVENTS Registernow tosaveUS$250 onthefullprice CHOOSE YOUR PASS TYPE – REGISTER NOW TO GET THE BEST PRICE! Ethical Trade and Human Rights Forum – a conference held by IF in partnership with the Ethical Trading Initiative 19th-20th October, London How business can tackle deforestation – innovation in sustainable forestry: technology, risk and collaboration 2nd-3rd November, London Why current consumer engagement on sustainability fails, and how to fix it – two days of difficult debate about reality and solutions 9th-10th November, London Sustainable Seafood: How business can source, manage and improve fish and marine resource sustainability – a two-day business sustainability strategy conference 25th-26th November, London If you're interested in any of these events, please do get in touch: Oliver Bamford | Tel +44 (0) 20 3780 7431 | oliver.bamford@innovation.forum.co.uk | www.innovation-forum.co.uk 3waystoregister T +44 (0) 20 3780 7433 E charlenne.ordonez@innovation-forum.co.uk W www.innovation-forum.co.uk/ deforestation-singapore EARLY BIRD Bookbefore24thJuly Standardpass: US$1,150 SaveUS$250 NGO/academic pass: US$850 SaveUS$250 LAST CHANCE Bookbefore21stAugust Standardpass: US$1,300 SaveUS$100 NGO/academic pass: US$1,000 SaveUS$100 FULL PRICE Standardpass: US$1,400 NGO/academic pass: US$1,100 www.innovation-forum.co.uk/deforestation-singapore

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