SMART Landscape Irrigation (Orlando, February 2011)

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The water we use to irrigate our crops is vital and still we as a nation continue to practice inefficient irrigation methods. Current irrigation practices waste an exorbitant amount of money and water using our current process.

The EPA states, "Commercial and residential outdoor water use in the United States accounts for more than seven billion gallons of water each day, mainly for landscape irrigation." The EPA estimates over three and a half billions gallons of water are wasted every day with inefficient and ineffective irrigation practices. More than fifty percent of irrigation water used in residential and commercial irrigation systems is wasted.

In this presentation, Barrett presents the "State of the Art" in irrigation design and installation. Barrett will present a comprehensive and sometimes controversial exploration of alternate water sources as well as the EPA WaterSense Program, SMART irrigation technology and current regulatory trends in the irrigation industry.

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SMART Landscape Irrigation (Orlando, February 2011)

  1. 1. SMARTLandscapeIrrigationBy Tom BarrettGreen Water Infrastructure, Inc.www.ThinkGWI.com Follow us on Twitter @TomBarrett_GWITom.Barrett@ThinkGWI.com © 2011 Tom Barrett
  2. 2. IT’S the ECONOMY
  3. 3. BankClosuresReach aRecord High
  4. 4. Excessive Capacity
  5. 5. Almost 80% Lost by Men... of the 5.1 Lost Jobs
  6. 6. If you’re not confused . . . …you’re not paying attention. - Tom Peters
  7. 7. The GREENEconomy
  8. 8. Peak Flow (1 Acre Site) Grass Field Roof1 Year Storm 630 gpm 1,932 gpm2 Year Storm 942 gpm 2,424 gpm10 Year Storm 1,932 gpm 3,588 gpm25 Year Storm 2,556 gpm 4,266 gpm100 Year Storm 3,588 gpm 5,388 gpm gpm – gallons per minute
  9. 9. Change in Peak Runoff Flow Before and after Development 300% 225% 150% 75% 0% Storm St orm St orm St orm St orm r r r r r ea ea ea ea ea 1Y 2Y 10Y 25Y 0Y 10 Stormwater Effects of Urbanization
  10. 10. Image of Rain Falling
  11. 11. PESTICIDE ISSUESATRAZINE, NITROGEN, PHOSPHOROUS
  12. 12. Stormwater Mitigation– Collection runoff near the source– Slow it down– Soak it in– Filter it– Apply it to the landscape– Create habitats
  13. 13. How Much Rain Falls in St. Louis?January - 1.83"February - 1.85"March - 2.88"April - 3.58"May - 4.10"June - 4.72"July - 3.56"August - 3.51"September - 3.17"October - 2.96"November - 2.35"December - 1.85"Total 36.36"
  14. 14. Monthly Rainfall St. Louis 5.00 4.72 4.10 3.75 3.58 3.56 3.51 3.17Rainfall (in.) 2.88 2.96 2.50 2.35 1.83 1.85 1.85 1.25 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  15. 15. How Much Water Does a Landscape Need in St. Louis?January - 0.00"February - 0.33"March - 1.04"April - 2.56"May - 4.60"June - 6.62"July - 7.60"August - 6.78"September - 4.42"October - 2.49"November - 0.83"December - 0.30"Total 37.57"
  16. 16. Monthly Evapotranspiration St. Louis 8.00 7.60 6.62 6.78Evapotranspiration (in.) 6.00 4.60 4.42 4.00 2.56 2.49 2.00 1.04 0.83 0 0.33 0.30 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  17. 17. What is the Problem? ? ? Month ET Rain Difference January - 0.00" 1.83" 1.83" February - 0.33" 1.85" 1.52" March - 1.04" 2.88" 1.84" April - 2.56" 3.58" 1.02" May - 4.60" 4.10" -0.50" June - 6.62" 4.72" -1.90" July - 7.60" 3.56" -4.04" August - 6.78" 3.51" -3.27" September - 4.42" 3.17" -1.25" October - 2.49" 2.96" 0.47" November - 0.83" 2.35" 1.52" December - 0.30" 1.85" 1.55" Total 37.57” 36.36" -1.21"
  18. 18. Monthly Evapotranspiration St. Louis 8.00 7.60 6.62 6.78Evapotranspiration (in.) 6.00 4.60 4.42 4.00 2.56 2.49 2.00 1.04 0.83 0 0.33 0.30 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  19. 19. Monthly Rainfall St. Louis 5.00 4.72 4.10 3.75 3.58 3.56 3.51 3.17Rainfall (in.) 2.88 2.96 2.50 2.35 1.83 1.85 1.85 1.25 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  20. 20. Monthly Evapotranspiration Shortfall - St. Louis 8.00 6.00 4.00Inches 2.00 0 -2.00 -4.00 -6.00 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  21. 21. History of IrrigationSystems 1917 - John A. Brooks Company Patens All Automatic Underground Irrigation Systems 1933 - Rain Bird Patents the First Horizontal Impact Rotor 1955 - Weathermatic Patents the first Hydraulic Valve 1960 - Blass invents the first Dripper 1968 - Moist-O-Matic develops the Plastic Sprinkler
  22. 22. Methods of ControlSystemsClimate BasedControllers Rain SensorsWeather Based Soil Moisture SensorsControllers Weather StationsInternet Based Pager TechnologyControllers
  23. 23. Climate Based Control
  24. 24. Weather Based Control Systems
  25. 25. Internet Based Control Systems
  26. 26. Rain Sensors
  27. 27. Soil Moisture Sensors
  28. 28. Weather Stations
  29. 29. Paging Technology
  30. 30. Low Volume Application In-line Emitter Tubing Drip Emitters Micro-Sprays Low Precipitation Rotors Advanced Sprayhead Technology
  31. 31. Drip Irrigation Systems
  32. 32. Drip Emitters
  33. 33. Micro Sprays
  34. 34. Low Precipitation Rotors
  35. 35. Sprayhead Technology
  36. 36. Alternate Water Sources Gray Water Effluent Water Rain Water Condensation
  37. 37. Gray Water
  38. 38. Effluent Water
  39. 39. Effluent Water
  40. 40. Rain Water
  41. 41. Untapped ReservoirUntapped ReservoirUntapped ReservoirUntapped ReservoirUntapped ReservoirUntapped Reservoir
  42. 42. How Much Rain Falls in St. Louis?January - 1.83"February - 1.85"March - 2.88"April - 3.58"May - 4.10"June - 4.72"July - 3.56"August - 3.51"September - 3.17"October - 2.96"November - 2.35"December - 1.85"Total 36.36"
  43. 43. How Much Water Falls in St. Louis? 2,500 sq. ft. RoofJanuary - ,852 gallons 2 Image of Rain FallingFebruary - ,883 2March - ,488 4April - 5,579May - ,390 6June - 7,356July - ,548 5August - ,470 5September- ,940 4October - ,613 4November - 3,662December - 2,883Total 6,664 5
  44. 44. How Much Water Falls in St. Louis? 3 Acre Commercial PropertyJanuary - 49,075 gallons 1February - 50,705 1March - 34,611 2April - 291,634May - 33,994 3June - 384,501July - 90,005 2August - 85,932 2September - 58,235 2October - 41,128 2November - 191,436December - 150,705Total 2,961,961
  45. 45. Image of Rain Falling
  46. 46. Stormwater MitigationStormwater MitigationStormwater MitigationStormwater MitigationStormwater Mitigation
  47. 47. HVAC Condensation½ gallon per hour per tonof air conditioning.1,000 ton air conditionerproduces 8 gallons ofwater per minute.Condensation productionoccurs when the landscapeneeds the water.
  48. 48. HVAC Condensation½ gallon per hour per tonof air conditioning.One ton of air conditioningfor every 700 sq. ft. of floorspace.One ton of air conditioningfor every 5,600 cu. ft. ofbuilding volume.
  49. 49. Residential Condensation8 to 15 gallons of waterper day.60 to 100 gallons perweek.250 to 450 gallons permonth.
  50. 50. Commercial Condensation15 gallons of water perminute.360 gallons of water per day.2,520 gallons of water perweek.10,000 gallons of water amonth.
  51. 51. LEED Rating System
  52. 52. LEED Rating System
  53. 53. EPA WaterSense Program
  54. 54. Irrigation Association
  55. 55. Irrigation Association
  56. 56. Irrigation Association
  57. 57. How Much Water?
  58. 58. HOLDthe Specification . . .
  59. 59. No Cost WaterConservation % WaterMonthly Irrigation Month ET BudgetController Adjustment April 2.6” 40% 30% Water Savings May 4.6” 0%Overall WaterConservation Resulting in: June 6.6” 140% July 7.6” 165% Reduced water usage August 6.8” 150% Improved appearance September 4.4” 95% Reduced maintenance October 2.5” 45%
  60. 60. It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. - Charles Darwin
  61. 61. The GREENEconomy
  62. 62. PLANTING TREES
  63. 63. FUNCTIONAL LANDSCAPES
  64. 64. Just Do It
  65. 65. Green • Water • InfrastructureGreen • Water • InfrastructureGreen • Water • InfrastructureGreen • Water • InfrastructureGreen • Water • Infrastructure
  66. 66. Thank You

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