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Guided Reading Tutorial
Understand the basics of guided reading for
elementary literacy
LIST 4373
Guided Reading Quiz is W...
Related Assignments
• Assignment: Week 5. Post your initial thoughts on the
guided reading lesson plan in small groups in
...
Objectives/Outcomes
In this tutorial, you will
1. Identify key aspects of the structure and planning of guided
reading
2. ...
How to maximize your learning using
this tutorial….
• Review the entire Guided Reading Tutorial
PowerPoint. Explore the we...
Elementary Guided Reading
• Guided reading is largely associated with the
ideas of prominent American literacy educators
I...
Guided Reading: “Big Ideas”
• Two documents will help you understand some of the key
ideas of guided reading. It is primar...
Leveling System
• Literacy instruction often begins with collecting baseline
data on reading levels to determine reading g...
Assessment
• Initial assessment (baseline data) to determine an
instructional reading level (90-95% accuracy with good
com...
Reading Levels
• Determining the readability level of a text is
not an exact science. Some good key websites
for looking u...
Scaffolding!
I do
We do
You do
*Vygotsky
Scaffolding is a key idea from the
grandfather of literacy, Lev
Vygotsky! Your ro...
General Tips on Success with Lesson
Planning!!!
• Web Tour
• http://www.readwritethink.org/
• *A fabulous resource!
• What...
Sample plans from readwritethink.org
• Questioning: A Comprehension Strategy for Small-Group Guided Reading
http://www.rea...
Resources
• Quick overview guide:
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Gui
ded-Reading-Quick-Guide-1156868
• Scaffo...
Overview of Guided Reading
Teaching active reading
• Guided reading: small group. Can focus on:
decoding, fluency, vocabul...
Big Ideas about Strategic Reading
• Explicit instruction
• Comprehending vs. comprehension (active
process vs. assessing)
...
Anchor Charts Support Learning and
the Strategic Focus of the Lesson(s)
• Use an anchor chart for your teaching focus.
Exp...
Planning and Aligning your Lesson with
Figure 19 (TEKS)
• Select one comprehension focus that aligns with Figure 19
• Figu...
Anchor Chart: A visual
This “looks like” a small poster you create
These are on Pinterest, etc. but please make your own a...
Using an Anchor Chart
• Use an anchor chart for your teaching focus.
Explicitly teach the what, why, when, and how of
your...
Modeling: “I do, we do, you do”
• Use strategy posters and think-aloud prompts.
• WHAT, WHY, WHEN, HOW of strategy
• Expla...
Application: modeling [explicit instruction/teacher-
centered/demonstration focus] “I do”
• Practice writing some modeling...
Application: guided practice “we do” [student-centered]
chunk the text/students apply strategy/give corective
feedback/deb...
Examples of assessment for guided
reading
• See the overviews from the beginning of the
PowerPoint for examples of assessm...
Tools for guided reading with a
comprehension and vocabulary focus
• Graphic Organizers
• Anchor Charts
• Character Traits...
Digital Tools to Support Learning
• Consider using Popplet or Bubbl.us for pre-
reading (comprehension) or for post-readin...
Vocabulary and Tier 2 Words
• Select 5-8 vocabulary words that are Tier 2
Vocabulary
• That is, Tier 2 vocabulary words ar...
Five Short Video Clips to Watch from
Teaching Channel
• Watch all five videos with Jenna and guided reading
https://www.te...
Putting it All Together and Next Steps
• This tutorial provided a few key resources for
you to better understand the struc...
Follow my Pinterest board on Guided
Reading! 
• https://www.pinterest.com/peggysemingson/
guided-reading-lesson-planning-...
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Guided Reading Tutorial

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This tutorial provides a basic overview of guided reading.

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Guided Reading Tutorial

  1. 1. Guided Reading Tutorial Understand the basics of guided reading for elementary literacy LIST 4373 Guided Reading Quiz is Week 6 Initial Thoughts on Guided Reading is Week 5 Dr. Peggy Semingson *Documents included in this tutorial were located on publicly found websites Tip: Start your own Pinterest boards for guided reading
  2. 2. Related Assignments • Assignment: Week 5. Post your initial thoughts on the guided reading lesson plan in small groups in Discussions. Post at least 3+ comments to peers. Post by Thursday, 2/18/16,(11:59 pm. Do 3+ formal comments by 6 pm Saturday, 2/20/16. Do informal follow-up replies by Sunday, 2/21/16 at 11:59 pm. • Assignment: Guided Reading Quiz on Blackboard (Week 6). The guided reading quiz will cover information from the guided reading tutorial. A study guide will be provided on Blackboard. The guided reading quiz test window is between Monday, 2/22/16 (12:01 am)-Sunday, 2/28/16 (11:59 pm). The study guide for the guided reading quiz is on Blackboard.
  3. 3. Objectives/Outcomes In this tutorial, you will 1. Identify key aspects of the structure and planning of guided reading 2. Examine and read several exemplar lesson plans for guided reading 3. Identify and analyze the central components of guided reading 4. Feel more confident about guided reading in general and guided reading lesson planning in particular! 5. Browse, explore and become familiar with resource websites for guided reading (e.g., Reading A to Z, bubbl.us, Popplet, etc.). 6. Archive digital resources for later use (e.g., assignments for the class, future teaching, etc.)
  4. 4. How to maximize your learning using this tutorial…. • Review the entire Guided Reading Tutorial PowerPoint. Explore the websites and documents that are linked in the PowerPoint. Not everything from the tutorial will be covered in the guided reading quiz, but please do explore all of the items in the tutorial as they will help you greatly in this class and in your future teaching. Save the links, tutorial, and documents for your future teaching. A good bookmarking tool is diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
  5. 5. Elementary Guided Reading • Guided reading is largely associated with the ideas of prominent American literacy educators Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Their ideas continue to shape the key concepts of guided reading and the way that texts are leveled according to readability levels and challenge to the reader. You can read more about their history of guided reading and the ways it is connected with Marie Clay’s Reading Recovery program here: www.heinemann.com/fountasandpinnell/fountas pinnellstory.pdf
  6. 6. Guided Reading: “Big Ideas” • Two documents will help you understand some of the key ideas of guided reading. It is primarily a small group (3-8 students) approach where a targeted literacy strategy or technique is used with students in intensive short amounts of time (15-25 minutes). Save both of these documents and review them carefully. • Document 1: A good overview guide with key concepts of guided reading is here (source: Mandan School District): http://www.mandan.k12.nd.us/lewisclark/teachers/Garlan d/include/files/documents/What%20is%20Guided%20Read ing.pdf • Document 2 (Austin ISD): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0cFN802Sa7RUC1RQ0xV M0VuVFE/view?usp=sharing
  7. 7. Leveling System • Literacy instruction often begins with collecting baseline data on reading levels to determine reading groups. This correlation chart from Reading A to Z shows how the different levels compare to each other and to grade level. Note the Fountas and Pinnell A-Z levels. You will see these often in schools as well as DRA levels. Note the criteria used at the bottom of the chart. • https://www.readinga-z.com/learninga-z-levels/level- correlation-chart/ • There are so many different terms associated with reading development. A general overview is here: https://www.readinga-z.com/learninga-z-levels/stages-of- development/
  8. 8. Assessment • Initial assessment (baseline data) to determine an instructional reading level (90-95% accuracy with good comprehension) is key to matching the reader with text. Your job will be to best match students with text. Remember that students bring different background knowledge and interest to text, too, so reading levels aren’t always “everything” as far as matching students with text. • A good overview of assessing students is from Reading A to Z: https://www.readinga-z.com/learninga-z- levels/assessing-a-students-level/
  9. 9. Reading Levels • Determining the readability level of a text is not an exact science. Some good key websites for looking up a reading level include: • Scholastic Book Wizard http://www.scholastic.com/bookwizard/ • AR Book Finder http://www.arbookfind.com/default.aspx • Other databases online
  10. 10. Scaffolding! I do We do You do *Vygotsky Scaffolding is a key idea from the grandfather of literacy, Lev Vygotsky! Your role in guided reading is to model strategic approaches to reading while offering support, as needed. Think of yourself as a coach, providing input and closely monitoring students.
  11. 11. General Tips on Success with Lesson Planning!!! • Web Tour • http://www.readwritethink.org/ • *A fabulous resource! • What resources related to literacy do you see? • How are lesson plans structured? • How is a lesson plan like a “recipe”? • Notice the type of language used (third person, step-by-step, procedural directions). • Focus on preparation (e.g., materials needed). • Browse some of the lesson plans and resources from readwritethink lesson plans: http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/ You can further refine your search on the left column.
  12. 12. Sample plans from readwritethink.org • Questioning: A Comprehension Strategy for Small-Group Guided Reading http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson- plans/questioning-comprehension-strategy-small-408.html • Guided Reading Strategies with Henry and Mudge http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson- plans/guided-reading-strategies-with-30510.html • Browse/skim the above plans including all the tabs for each one. Note the structure of the plan, the specific instruction, and the third person nature of the lesson plan. Each step under the “instructional plan” section are written as procedural steps.
  13. 13. Resources • Quick overview guide: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Gui ded-Reading-Quick-Guide-1156868 • Scaffolding Tools such as Bookmarks, Cards, etc. • http://www.janrichardsonguidedreading.com/resour ces-1 • Organizing for Guided Reading (*I highly recommend the sticky note technique: • http://guidedreading101.weebly.com/organization.ht ml
  14. 14. Overview of Guided Reading Teaching active reading • Guided reading: small group. Can focus on: decoding, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension.
  15. 15. Big Ideas about Strategic Reading • Explicit instruction • Comprehending vs. comprehension (active process vs. assessing) • Need to help students activate their schema or background knowledge by building schematic background (BSB) prior to the lesson. • Consider: – What are ways to help students activate their background knowledge??
  16. 16. Anchor Charts Support Learning and the Strategic Focus of the Lesson(s) • Use an anchor chart for your teaching focus. Explicitly teach the what, why, when, and how of your teaching focus. Students should know what it is they are learning and why it is important. This is the case for all of your teaching all day long, in fact. • Search for comprehension anchor charts on Pinterest, Google Images, and on teacher blogs.
  17. 17. Planning and Aligning your Lesson with Figure 19 (TEKS) • Select one comprehension focus that aligns with Figure 19 • Figure 19 is here: http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter110/19_0110_0010- 1.pdf • Pick one comprehension focus: main idea/get the gist, connecting (pick one: text to self, text to text, text to world connections), drawing conclusions (making inferences), self-monitoring, predicting/confirming (can do a t-chart), questioning /wondering (good for non-fiction), visualizing; Find this in Figure 19 and by consulting the ELAR TEKS. • Read through Figure 19 and select one comprehension focus. If you are not sure, you can select “summarizing”. Many districts will tell you what your comprehension focus is for the week, which makes planning quite easy!
  18. 18. Anchor Chart: A visual This “looks like” a small poster you create These are on Pinterest, etc. but please make your own anchor chart for this course! • You will be creating a comprehension anchor chart • -main idea (get the gist) • Connecting (T-T, T-S, T-W)-pick one only • Drawing conclusion/inferencing • Self-monitoring • Visualizing • Other strategies from Figure 19
  19. 19. Using an Anchor Chart • Use an anchor chart for your teaching focus. Explicitly teach the what, why, when, and how of your teaching focus. Students should know what it is they are learning and why it is important. This is the case for all of your teaching all day long, in fact. • Look for examples of comprehension anchor charts and guided reading anchor charts on Pinterest or Google Images.
  20. 20. Modeling: “I do, we do, you do” • Use strategy posters and think-aloud prompts. • WHAT, WHY, WHEN, HOW of strategy • Explanation, Model, Scaffold • Include lots of teacher talk I statements “I’m noticing…” etc.
  21. 21. Application: modeling [explicit instruction/teacher- centered/demonstration focus] “I do” • Practice writing some modeling statements using think-aloud statements. • --restate objective to students • --what, why, when, how • --set purpose for learning • Use opening moves and think-aloud statements.
  22. 22. Application: guided practice “we do” [student-centered] chunk the text/students apply strategy/give corective feedback/debrief • Practice writing some guided practice for guided reading statements using strategic stopping points and having students apply the strategy. • --locate stopping points • --students apply strategy • --share/debrief/move-on • *Keep lesson moving forward while staying focused on teaching objective!
  23. 23. Examples of assessment for guided reading • See the overviews from the beginning of the PowerPoint for examples of assessment. • Other assessments – Graphic organizer that aligns with the comprehension focus of the lesson. This can be a digital graphic organizer. – Student 1-on-1 read aloud with teacher noting areas of strength and challenge (e.g., accuracy, fluency) – Literature response journal that aligns with the comprehension focus of the lesson.
  24. 24. Tools for guided reading with a comprehension and vocabulary focus • Graphic Organizers • Anchor Charts • Character Traits Charts/Lists • iPads/mobile tools • Pocket chart or iPad or Popplet for displaying vocabulary words.
  25. 25. Digital Tools to Support Learning • Consider using Popplet or Bubbl.us for pre- reading (comprehension) or for post-reading (retell, comprehension, main ideas). Examples: http://skillsnack.weebly.com/popplet- examples-from-our-teachers.html You can make up to five free Popplets with the free account. Be creative and seek out other examples of both Popplet and bubbl.us for mind mapping and use in guided reading!
  26. 26. Vocabulary and Tier 2 Words • Select 5-8 vocabulary words that are Tier 2 Vocabulary • That is, Tier 2 vocabulary words are not rare or unusual but they are also not common or ordinary and it is likely that students will see the words again. • Skim through the following link to better understand how to choose vocabulary words for a guided reading lesson.: http://www.readingrockets.org/article/choosing- words-teach
  27. 27. Five Short Video Clips to Watch from Teaching Channel • Watch all five videos with Jenna and guided reading https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/guided-reading- differentiation-system • Guided Reading with Jenna Complete Lesson • Guided Reading with Jenna: Introducing Work Stations • Guided Reading with Jenna: Overview • Guided Reading with Jenna: Classroom Management • Guided Reading with Jenna: Small Group Guided Reading • *You can watch the videos in any order.
  28. 28. Putting it All Together and Next Steps • This tutorial provided a few key resources for you to better understand the structure and purpose of guided reading. • Continue to collect resources for guided reading through Pinterest, Teachers Pay Teachers website (look for free items), Teaching Channel [videos], and by talking to classroom teachers about their ideas and resources.
  29. 29. Follow my Pinterest board on Guided Reading!  • https://www.pinterest.com/peggysemingson/ guided-reading-lesson-planning-resources/ • I will be adding to this Pinterest board on guided reading throughout the semester! • -Dr. Semingson

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