Social media in Disaster Response and Preparedness

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How can social media contribute to disaster response and disaster preparedness? Presentation given during the "Social Media and Resilience Workshop" in Bangkok, Thailand in July 2013.

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  • Japan: 8,000 relevant tweets per 5 minutes;
  • Social media in Disaster Response and Preparedness

    1. 1. Social Media and Online Collaboration in Disaster Response and Preparedness Anticipate, reduce the impact and cope with disasters Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com23.07.2013 1 #sm4resPhoto: Félix Genêt Laframboise/IFRC
    2. 2. 23.07.2013 2Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Photo: Marco Dormino/UNDP How useful is social media when you are faced with this?
    3. 3. 23.07.2013 3Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Photo: Marco Dormino/UNDP How useful is all of this when you are faced with a disaster?  Can be very useful for disaster preparedness  Can provide life-saving information to survivors  Can increase your awareness of what is happening, improve accountability and transparency -> All of this depends on your country -> You need to practise before an emergency
    4. 4. DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 4
    5. 5. Example: The Great ShakeOut  Annual earthquake drill in the US  Since 2008; last year 9.3 million people participated in California alone  Social media is used to encourage safe behaviour, create excitement and keep people involved over the year  Also includes mass media, emergency response organizations, city government etc. 23.07.2013 5Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    6. 6. ShakeOut is not a social media campaign, but a disaster preparedness activity that is supported by social media. 23.07.2013 6Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    7. 7. “[W]hat makes us special is that we are already extremely relevant. We’re based in Earthquake Country. Yet, we try to make preparedness and recovery fresh, interesting, and fun. Social media is a great way for us to do that, and I think our sincerity and wish to keep people safe and ready is obvious.” - @JasonBallmann 23.07.2013 7Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    8. 8. 23.07.2013 8Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    9. 9. 23.07.2013 9Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    10. 10. 23.07.2013 10Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    11. 11. 23.07.2013 11Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Regular, useful and relevant updates that keep people interested.
    12. 12. 23.07.2013 12Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Humour can help: Don’t be tooooooooooo serious, even if the topic is serious
    13. 13. DISASTER RESPONSE 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 13
    14. 14. In a disaster social media is about …  trying to help people directly  improving your awareness of what is happening  enabling the affected people help themselves. 23.07.2013 14Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    15. 15. Image: UNOCHA; Modified by author Social media enables communities People affected by a disaster are either using social media themselves or indirectly through local media to:  Share “safe and well“ messages  Coordinate resources to fill needs  Find information
    16. 16. It is essential that you listen 23.07.2013 16Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Social media monitoring tool Other … Look for hashtags, but do not only focus on hashtags!
    17. 17. Tweetdeck.com One of many social media listening platforms 23.07.2013 17Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    18. 18. Example: Twitter, the Fire Department and Hurricane Sandy 23.07.2013 18Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Emiliy Rahimi, NYFD social media manager
    19. 19. Emily Rahimi, NYFD  Answered hundreds of questions via Twitter during Hurricane Sandy  Gave advices and shared warnings  Connected people to emergency services where phone lines had failed  Sat at (and slept under) her desk for 30 hours 23.07.2013 19Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    20. 20. HOW MOBILE APPS CAN CHANGE THE INFORMATION FLOW Example 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 20
    21. 21. New tools are trying to close the information -> decision loop and include feedback- mechanisms. 23.07.2013 21Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com www.stormpins.com
    22. 22. New tools are trying to close the information -> decision loop and include feedback- mechanisms. 23.07.2013 22Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com www.stormpins.com
    23. 23. What is true? 23.07.2013 23Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    24. 24. Advice to verify information  What has this user posted in the past?  What does the user’s profile tell you in this context?  Are there other sources?  Ask internal and external experts  What about GPS data  Reverse image search (http://www.tineye.com/) or (http://www.tineye.com/) 23.07.2013 24Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    25. 25. 23.07.2013 25Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Image: UNOCHA
    26. 26. The information paradox In a disaster you have at the same time too much and too little information. 23.07.2013 26Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    27. 27. What we want: Enhanced situational awareness though social media and online collaboration 23.07.2013 27Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    28. 28. Why use collaborative online tools for situational awareness?  Immediate / in real time (as long as networks and internet are up)  Many eyes and ears  Information collection on the aggregate and the individual level  Distributed information analysis 23.07.2013 28Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    29. 29. How much is relevant?  About 8 per cent of tweets sent during a disaster contain situational information  After the earthquake/tsunami in Japan, more than 100,000 tweets were posted every five minutes  After the 2011 New Zealand eartquake, 7,500 tweets were posted per hour using the hashtag #nzeq → We need tools that help us identify relevant information and remove duplicates 23.07.2013 29Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    30. 30. Chile earthquake on Twitter 23.07.2013 30Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com Image: UNOCHA
    31. 31. CROWDTASKING – FINDING MANY HELPERS ONLINE 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 31
    32. 32. 23.07.2013 32Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    33. 33. Crowdtasking  Strengths: • Allows you perform very big tasks in a very short period of time. • Easy of use for volunteers • Multiple organizations/companies exists that provide tools for free/gifts in kind  Challenges: • Needs time and some technical expertise to prepare before a disaster strikes. • Most tools are in English. 23.07.2013 33Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    34. 34. CRISIS CLEANUP Example 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 34
    35. 35. Why use Crisis Cleanup? Strengths:  Online task management tool for organizations coordinating volunteers.  Developed by someone who had to coordinate 30,000 volunteers in 5,000 locations across 500 miles.  Does not require a centralized „task master“.  Improved transparency and accountability  Free and open source 23.07.2013 35Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    36. 36. Why use Crisis Cleanup? Weakness:  No data entry by general public  Does require dedicated, authenticated data entry personell (call center) 23.07.2013 36Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    37. 37. 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 37 https://www.crisiscleanup.org
    38. 38. 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 38
    39. 39. 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 39
    40. 40. 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 40
    41. 41. Crisis Cleanup does not use social media but it embodies a social mindset! -> http://demo.crisiscleanup.org 23.07.2013 41Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    42. 42. Community of Practice for Social Media in Emergencies  Follow #smem on Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus  “Social Media in Emergencies” communities on LinkedIn and Google Plus  Various blogs 23.07.2013 42Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    43. 43. GROUP WORK 23.07.2013 Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com 43
    44. 44. What would an ideal collaborative information management system look like in your country? 1. What information would you like to collect in an emergency or as part of disaster preparedness? 2. How would you get that information? 3. How are you sharing the information once you have collected it? 4. With whom are you sharing this information and why? 23.07.2013 44Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com
    45. 45. Thank you! Timo Lüge Social Media for Good www.sm4good.com timo.luege@gmail.com Twitter: @timolue 23.07.2013 45Social Media for Good – www.sm4good.com

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