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Women at work and the glass ceiling June 2011

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Half day open interactive workshop in Toronto on women and career progression/advancement.

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Women at work and the glass ceiling June 2011

  1. 1. Women at work and the glass ceiling <br />by Toronto Training and HR <br />June 2011<br />
  2. 2. Contents<br />3-4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR<br /> 5-6 Definitions<br /> 7-8 Reasons for having greater gender diversity on boards<br /> 9-10 Off-ramps and on-ramps<br /> 11-12 Level of first position<br /> 13-23 Four stages of contribution<br /> 24-28 Rising to the top<br /> 29-35 Quotas<br />36-41 What should organizations do? <br /> 42-43 Drill<br />44-49 Case studies<br />50-51 Conclusion and questions<br />Page 2<br />
  3. 3. Page 3<br />Introduction<br />
  4. 4. Page 4<br />Introduction to Toronto Training and HR<br />Toronto Training and HRis a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden <br />10 years in banking<br />10 years in training and human resources<br />Freelance practitioner since 2006<br />The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are:<br /><ul><li>Training course design
  5. 5. Training course delivery</li></ul>- Reducing costs<br /><ul><li>Saving time
  6. 6. Improving employee engagement & morale
  7. 7. Services for job seekers</li></li></ul><li>Page 5<br />Definitions<br />
  8. 8. Page 6<br />Definitions<br />Glass ceiling<br />Glass cliff<br />
  9. 9. Page 7<br />Reasons for having greater gender diversity on boards<br />
  10. 10. Page 8<br />Reasons for having greater gender diversity on boards<br />The talent pool<br />Understanding customers<br />Tackling group-think<br />Family-friendly labour market<br />Women’s rights<br />
  11. 11. Page 9<br />Off-ramps and on-ramps<br />
  12. 12. Page 40<br />CEO/senior position<br />Mid-manager or equivalent on professional/technical track<br />First-level manager or equivalent on professional/technical track<br />Entry-level or individual contributor<br />
  13. 13. Page 11<br />Level of first position<br />
  14. 14. Page 12<br />Level of first position<br />CEO/senior position<br />Mid-manager or equivalent on professional/technical track<br />First-level manager or equivalent on professional/technical track<br />Entry-level or individual contributor<br />
  15. 15. Page 13<br />Four stages of contribution<br />
  16. 16. Page 14<br />Four stages of contribution 1 of 10<br />STAGE 1. Contributing dependently<br />STAGE 2. Contributing independently<br />STAGE 3. Contributing through others<br />STAGE 4. Contributing strategically<br />
  17. 17. Page 15<br />Four stages of contribution 2 of 10<br />DIFFERENCES BETWEEN STAGE 3 AND STAGE 4 Transition area<br />Stage 3 focus<br />Stage 4 focus<br />
  18. 18. Page 16<br />Four stages of contribution 3 of 10<br />POWER-TO EARN AND MAINTAIN THE ABILITY TO EXERCISE<br />Take strong positions on critical issues.<br />Fight for key resources, programs, or people.<br />Form alliances to gain support.<br />Accept dependence on trust and support of others.<br />
  19. 19. Page 17<br />Four stages of contribution 4 of 10<br />CRITICAL BEHAVIOURS OF STAGE 4 CONTRIBUTION <br />Ability to articulate a clear vision and develop a strategy to implement the vision.<br />Ability to anticipate long-term opportunities and threats and mobilize the organization to respond.<br />Ability to recognize trade-offs and to make and defend tough decisions.<br />
  20. 20. Page 18<br />Four stages of contribution 5 of 10<br />CRITICAL BEHAVIOURS OF STAGE 4 CONTRIBUTION <br />Ability to gain visibility for objectives, actions, and results.<br />Achievement of business results (at P&L level).<br />Demonstrated holistic understanding of<br />organization, industry, and markets.<br />Ability to recognize and leverage sources of power and influence appropriately.<br />
  21. 21. Page 19<br />Four stages of contribution 6 of 10<br />DEVELOPING STAGE 4 COMPETENCE <br />Becoming recognized as competent in Stage 4 may be the biggest challenge.<br />Women need to acknowledge and promote their accomplishments.<br />Anyone seeking to develop themselves in an organization must push themselves, but this is especially true for those seeking to be recognized Stage 4 contributors.<br />Women need to find good coaches who model the Stage 4 characteristics they wish to develop—and these coaches<br />do not need to be women.<br />
  22. 22. Page 20<br />Four stages of contribution 7 of 10<br />DEVELOPING STAGE 4 COMPETENCE <br />Women fortunate enough to have a mentor and/or sponsor relationship should make the most of these relationships.<br />Seeking feedback from trusted and valued people is also of utmost importance, as is accepting and acknowledging the other person’s point of view.<br />An organization’s affinity or resource group can help women practice developing Stage 4 skills and build<br />influence within these groups.<br />
  23. 23. Page 21<br />Four stages of contribution 8 of 10<br />WHAT CAN LEADERS DO TO HELP WOMEN ACHIEVE RECOGNIZED STAGE 4 COMPETENCE<br />Senior leaders can be intentional about the types of assignments and developmental opportunities that women are provided to help ensure women are stretching in new<br />and different ways.<br />Being open and accepting different ways to accomplish work will help senior leaders recognize that gender can play a role in how information is processed, how work is accomplished, and how results are achieved.<br />Senior leaders need to focus on the outcome or deliverables.<br />
  24. 24. Page 22<br />Four stages of contribution 9 of 10<br />WHAT CAN LEADERS DO TO HELP WOMEN ACHIEVE RECOGNIZED STAGE 4 COMPETENCE<br />Senior leaders can be intentional about the types of assignments and developmental opportunities that women are provided to help ensure women are stretching in new and different ways.<br />Being open and accepting different ways to accomplish work will help senior leaders recognize that gender can play a role in how information is processed, how work<br />is accomplished, and how results are achieved.<br />
  25. 25. Page 23<br />Four stages of contribution 10 of 10<br />WHAT CAN LEADERS DO TO HELP WOMEN ACHIEVE RECOGNIZED STAGE 4 COMPETENCE<br />As a senior leader, ask yourself how you are “positioning” your team members.<br />Seeking feedback on the culture that is being perpetuated at senior levels will help senior leaders to know if barriers (some more obvious than others) exist that make it difficult for women to build relationships, gain visibility, and gain credibility at senior levels.<br />
  26. 26. Page 24<br />Rising to the top<br />
  27. 27. Page 25<br />Rising to the top 1 of 4<br />KEY SKILLS<br />Decisiveness<br />Assertive communication<br />Political and organization savvy<br />Inspire performance<br />Work-life balance<br />
  28. 28. Page 26<br />Rising to the top 2 of 4<br />BUILDING A GOOD RELATIONSHIP<br />With the CEO<br />With your peers<br />With your direct reports<br />With customers and clients<br />With analysts and shareholders<br />With the board <br />
  29. 29. Page 27<br />Rising to the top 3 of 4<br />WHY CEO SUCCESSION CANDIDATES DON’T GET THE JOB<br />The potential successor and the CEO miscommunicate<br />The CEO and the board miscommunicate<br />The CEO decides to stay put<br />The board falls in love with an outsider<br />A board member takes the job<br />Company performance tanks<br />
  30. 30. Page 28<br />Rising to the top 4 of 4<br />LEARNING FROM OTHER NATIONS<br />
  31. 31. Page 29<br />Quotas<br />
  32. 32. Page 30<br />Quotas 1 of 6<br />ADVANTAGES OF THEM EXISTING<br />Quotas would be a way of counteracting the gender discrimination women face in the workplace such as penalties for motherhood and inferior pay for same / similar work. <br />It would be some way of getting suitable women in the top positions.<br />
  33. 33. Page 31<br />Quotas 2 of 6<br />DISADVANTAGES OF THEM EXISTING<br />But, if you try to label this, it is simply another form of discrimination.<br />It is not putting the best person in the job. <br />It is inequality.<br />
  34. 34. Page 322<br />Quotas 3 of 6<br />ADVANTAGES FOR WOMEN<br />Considering that the usual barriers to promotion are gone, women would be encouraged to better themselves in order to achieve the top positions.<br />
  35. 35. Page 33<br />Quotas 4 of 6<br />DISADVANTAGES FOR WOMEN<br />Being ‘gifted’ such positions might well lead to negative feelings from male colleagues who have not been given a chance. <br />The women themselves could hardly feel great at being in a position they have not got through merit.<br />
  36. 36. Page 34<br />Quotas 5 of 6<br />ADVANTAGES FOR ORGANIZATIONS<br />Quotas would lead to fewer positions on boards for men, which would lead to them becoming more competitive, leading to higher standards and output of performance. <br />Women have different skill sets to men, being better at selecting varied approaches to tasks and having superior communication skills, and being more circumspect in difficult times-this would lead to more balanced and effective boards.<br />
  37. 37. Page 35<br />Quotas 6 of 6<br />DISADVANTAGES FOR ORGANIZATIONS<br />Women will wonder if they have been promoted for their gender, not their ability. <br />Men may start to under-perform as they feel they are unlikely to be promoted in place of a woman. Companies should simply be free to promote the best people of either gender-surely that’s what companies now do, they want the best. <br />
  38. 38. Page 36<br />What should organizations do?<br />
  39. 39. Page 37<br />What should organizations do? 1 of 5<br />ACTIONS TO TAKE<br />Conduct a self-assessment<br />Increase disclosure of corporate diversity practices<br />Support public policy and community efforts<br />
  40. 40. Page 38<br />What should organizations do? 2 of 5<br />REMOVE NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES WHEN COMPARING WOMEN TO MEN <br />Work-life balance<br />Person-organization fit<br />Person-job fit<br />Nomination for promotion<br />In-role performance<br />Caring responsibilities<br />
  41. 41. Page 39<br />What should organizations do? 3 of 5<br />GENERATE FEMALE EMPOWERMENT<br />Accelerate women’s leadership within the organization<br />Bring more women-owned concerns into the supply chain <br />Stay committed to sustainability initiatives<br />
  42. 42. Page 40<br />What should organizations do? 4 of 5<br />MAKE WOMEN HAPPIER AT WORK<br />Offer flexible schedules<br />Partner with your Employee Assistance Program<br />Provide or enhance work-life programs<br />Provide concierge perks<br />Conduct training and seminars<br />Provide access to online support groups<br />Offer mentorship programs<br />Enhance time off policies<br />Offer wellness programs<br />
  43. 43. Page 41<br />What should organizations do? 5 of 5<br />INTERVENTIONS<br />Non-tokenistic affirmative action policies <br />Active mentoring programs <br />Group-based consciousness-raising <br />
  44. 44. Page 42<br />Drill<br />
  45. 45. Page 43<br />Drill <br />
  46. 46. Page 44<br />Case study A<br />
  47. 47. Page 45<br />Case study A <br />
  48. 48. Page 46<br />Case study B<br />
  49. 49. Page 47<br />Case study B <br />
  50. 50. Page 48<br />Case study C<br />
  51. 51. Page 49<br />Case study A <br />
  52. 52. Page 50<br />Conclusion & Questions<br />
  53. 53. Page 51<br />Conclusion<br />Summary<br />Questions<br />

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