Ethics and morals in the work
environment

by Toronto Training and HR

November 2013
CONTENTS
5-6
7-8
9-10
11-12
13-14
15-16
17-18
19-20
21-23
24-26
27-28
29-31
32-33
34-35
36-37
38-40
41-43
44-46
47-48
49-5...
Introduction

Page 3
Introduction to Toronto Training
and HR
Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and
human resources consultancy h...
Definitions

Page 5
Definitions
• Ethics
• Ethical culture
• Morals

Page 6
Characteristics of
behaviour at work

Page 7
Characteristics of behaviour at
work
•
•
•
•
•
•

Page 8

General responsibility
Job accountability
Leadership style
Sales...
Decision making

Page 9
Decision making
Ethics, can
it be
justified?

Law, is it
legal?

Economy, is
it in
accordance
with our
objectives?

Identi...
Orderly and disorderly
organizations

Page 11
Orderly and disorderly
organizations
• Recruitment and hiring practices
• Supervisory and management
practices
• Corporate...
Counterproductivity

Page 13
Counterproductivity
• Employees
• Executives

Page 14
Criminal behaviour

Page 15
Criminal behaviour
• Employees
• Executives

Page 16
Behavioural integrity

Page 17
Behavioural integrity
• What you say
• What you do
• Who you are

Page 18
Risk factors

Page 19
Risk factors
• Need
• Opportunity
• Attitude

Page 20
Putting others before
oneself

Page 21
Putting others before oneself 1 of 2
TYPICAL APPROACHES
• Repeatedly revive the team's
purpose and mission
• Avoid taking ...
Putting others before oneself 2 of 2
TYPICAL APPROACHES (CONTINUED)
• Treat all team members
objectively, equally and fair...
Giving and taking

Page 24
Giving and taking 1 of 2
QUESTIONS TO ASK
• What, if anything, does the giver
hope to get in return from the
receiver?
• M...
Giving and taking 2 of 2
QUESTIONS TO ASK (CONTINUED)
• What is the exact value of the
object changing hands?
• At what st...
Want and should

Page 27
Want and should
• WANT-what we desire to do
• SHOULD-thoughts about how we
should behave
• Want choices
• Should choices

...
Facts about ethics

Page 29
Facts about ethics 1 of 2
• Insiders seem unconcerned about
ethical lapses (most CEOs are silent
about their colleagues’ m...
Facts about ethics 2 of 2
• Even companies under
investigation for ethical violations
rank honesty and integrity as key
at...
An ethical culture

Page 32
An ethical culture
• Formal systems
• Informal systems

Page 33
Cost of ethical misconduct

Page 34
Cost of ethical misconduct
• Endangers an organization’s
employer brand or perception
as an employer of choice
• Endangers...
Ethical leadership models

Page 36
Ethical leadership models
• Servant leadership
• Transformational leadership

Page 37
The causes of unethical
leadership behaviour

Page 38
The causes of unethical leadership
behaviour 1 of 2
• Enormous power
• Access to money with low visibility
• Control over ...
The causes of unethical leadership
behaviour 2 of 2
• Relentless pressure to achieve
continuous improvement in
quarter-to-...
Preventing unethical
leadership behaviour

Page 41
Preventing unethical leadership
behaviour 1 of 2
• Put safeguards in place to prevent
misdeeds and warn new executives
of ...
Preventing unethical leadership
behaviour 2 of 2
HIGH INTEGRITY LEADERS
TYPICALLY:
• Seem approachable
• Act with humility...
Morals

Page 44
Morals 1 of 2
• A moral person
• A moral manager

Page 45
Morals 2 of 2
Weak

Strong

• A moral person
moral
moral
• A moral manager

person

Strong
moral
manager
Weak
moral
manage...
A moral work climate

Page 47
A moral work climate
• Work climate according to the
facilities
• Protecting work climate
• Independence work climate
• Wo...
Conclusion and questions

Page 49
Conclusion and questions
Summary
Videos
Questions

Page 50
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Ethics and morals in the work environment November 2013

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Ethics and morals in the work environment November 2013

  1. 1. Ethics and morals in the work environment by Toronto Training and HR November 2013
  2. 2. CONTENTS 5-6 7-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 17-18 19-20 21-23 24-26 27-28 29-31 32-33 34-35 36-37 38-40 41-43 44-46 47-48 49-50 Definitions Characteristics of behaviour at work Decision making Orderly and disorderly organizations Counterproductivity Criminal behaviour Behavioural integrity Risk factors Putting others before oneself Giving and taking Want and should Facts about ethics An ethical culture Cost of ethical misconduct Ethical leadership models The causes of unethical leadership behaviour Preventing unethical leadership behaviour Morals A moral work climate Conclusion and questions Page 2
  3. 3. Introduction Page 3
  4. 4. Introduction to Toronto Training and HR Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden 10 years in banking 10 years in training and human resources Freelance practitioner since 2006 The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are: Training event design Training event delivery Reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers Page 4
  5. 5. Definitions Page 5
  6. 6. Definitions • Ethics • Ethical culture • Morals Page 6
  7. 7. Characteristics of behaviour at work Page 7
  8. 8. Characteristics of behaviour at work • • • • • • Page 8 General responsibility Job accountability Leadership style Sales aptitude Stress response Stress tolerance
  9. 9. Decision making Page 9
  10. 10. Decision making Ethics, can it be justified? Law, is it legal? Economy, is it in accordance with our objectives? Identity, is it in accordance with our values? Reputation, does it affect our goodwill? Morality, is it right? Page 10
  11. 11. Orderly and disorderly organizations Page 11
  12. 12. Orderly and disorderly organizations • Recruitment and hiring practices • Supervisory and management practices • Corporate ethics and satisfaction programs • Risk management programs-loss control, security and safety • Facility appearance and organization Page 12
  13. 13. Counterproductivity Page 13
  14. 14. Counterproductivity • Employees • Executives Page 14
  15. 15. Criminal behaviour Page 15
  16. 16. Criminal behaviour • Employees • Executives Page 16
  17. 17. Behavioural integrity Page 17
  18. 18. Behavioural integrity • What you say • What you do • Who you are Page 18
  19. 19. Risk factors Page 19
  20. 20. Risk factors • Need • Opportunity • Attitude Page 20
  21. 21. Putting others before oneself Page 21
  22. 22. Putting others before oneself 1 of 2 TYPICAL APPROACHES • Repeatedly revive the team's purpose and mission • Avoid taking personal credit for the team’s success • Encourage team spirit and cooperation • Remind the team members how their personal interests will be fulfilled only by the success of the team's mission Page 22
  23. 23. Putting others before oneself 2 of 2 TYPICAL APPROACHES (CONTINUED) • Treat all team members objectively, equally and fairly don't use or abuse the authority you have over the team members to your own personal advantage • Remember that people perform best when they can satisfy their deep life aspirations and priorities Page 23
  24. 24. Giving and taking Page 24
  25. 25. Giving and taking 1 of 2 QUESTIONS TO ASK • What, if anything, does the giver hope to get in return from the receiver? • More generally, what is the giver’s motivation or intention? • To what extent does the giver want to gain an improper advantage? • What is the professional relationship between the two? Page 25
  26. 26. Giving and taking 2 of 2 QUESTIONS TO ASK (CONTINUED) • What is the exact value of the object changing hands? • At what stage in the professional relationship are they? • Does the action take place before the receiver is to make a decision involving the giver or in the aftermath of such an event? • To what extent does the local culture accept gifts between business relations? Page 26
  27. 27. Want and should Page 27
  28. 28. Want and should • WANT-what we desire to do • SHOULD-thoughts about how we should behave • Want choices • Should choices Page 28
  29. 29. Facts about ethics Page 29
  30. 30. Facts about ethics 1 of 2 • Insiders seem unconcerned about ethical lapses (most CEOs are silent about their colleagues’ misconduct) • When ranking dimensions of executive conduct, managers and executives give the highest scores to honesty and integrity • When subordinates, peers and bosses rank how managers behave on several dimensions, they give the highest scores for ethical and honest behaviour Page 30
  31. 31. Facts about ethics 2 of 2 • Even companies under investigation for ethical violations rank honesty and integrity as key attributes for leaders • Lack of integrity and honesty is rarely mentioned in feedback to leaders, even when the ratings show low scores in the dimension Page 31
  32. 32. An ethical culture Page 32
  33. 33. An ethical culture • Formal systems • Informal systems Page 33
  34. 34. Cost of ethical misconduct Page 34
  35. 35. Cost of ethical misconduct • Endangers an organization’s employer brand or perception as an employer of choice • Endangers an organization’s financial status • Endangers an organization’s security Page 35
  36. 36. Ethical leadership models Page 36
  37. 37. Ethical leadership models • Servant leadership • Transformational leadership Page 37
  38. 38. The causes of unethical leadership behaviour Page 38
  39. 39. The causes of unethical leadership behaviour 1 of 2 • Enormous power • Access to money with low visibility • Control over perks that can be used for personal benefit • Few, if any, operational checks and balances • Minimal oversight from the VPs • Huge incentives to reach certain milestones Page 39
  40. 40. The causes of unethical leadership behaviour 2 of 2 • Relentless pressure to achieve continuous improvement in quarter-to-quarter results • Belief that they are responsible for the financial success of the organization and deserving of huge financial rewards • The grey nature of many issues with which leaders grapple • The slippery slope phenomenon Page 40
  41. 41. Preventing unethical leadership behaviour Page 41
  42. 42. Preventing unethical leadership behaviour 1 of 2 • Put safeguards in place to prevent misdeeds and warn new executives of the dangers • Instill a balanced message regarding results and methods for attaining results Page 42
  43. 43. Preventing unethical leadership behaviour 2 of 2 HIGH INTEGRITY LEADERS TYPICALLY: • Seem approachable • Act with humility • Listen with intensity • Make decisions carefully • Act assertively and courageously by speaking up and reporting any wrong-doing Page 43
  44. 44. Morals Page 44
  45. 45. Morals 1 of 2 • A moral person • A moral manager Page 45
  46. 46. Morals 2 of 2 Weak Strong • A moral person moral moral • A moral manager person Strong moral manager Weak moral manager person Ethical Hypocritical leader leader Unethical ? leader Page 46
  47. 47. A moral work climate Page 47
  48. 48. A moral work climate • Work climate according to the facilities • Protecting work climate • Independence work climate • Work climate according to regulations • Work climate by rules Page 48
  49. 49. Conclusion and questions Page 49
  50. 50. Conclusion and questions Summary Videos Questions Page 50

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