Tackling ageism<br />by Fluid <br />June 2010<br />
Page 2<br />Contents<br />3-4 		Introduction to Fluid<br />5-9Definitions<br />10-11Stat attack<br />12-13	What barriers e...
Page 3<br />Introduction<br />
Page 4<br />Introduction to Fluid<br />Fluid Consulting Limited (Fluid) is a specialist human resources consultancy headed...
Selection</li></ul>-  Attraction<br />-  Remuneration & Reward <br />-  Outplacement<br />-  Training & HR consultancy<br />
Page 5<br />Definitions<br />
Page 6<br />Definitions 1 of 4<br /><ul><li>VETERANS
Born before 1948
Experienced the Second World War in their childhood
Known as traditionalists in the USA
Joined the workforce when job opportunities were abundant
50% have spent at least ten years with their current employer
33% have spent more than 20 years with their current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 7<br />Definitions 2 of 4<br /><ul><l...
Born between 1948 and 1963
Experienced a push for civil rights, the womens’ movement, union power and high inflation
Joined the workforce when there was high competition for work and their success has often resulted from long working hours
50% have spent their last ten years with their current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 8<br />Definitions 3 of 4<br /><ul>...
Born between 1964 and 1978
‘Thatcher’s children’
Many graduated into the worst job market since the Depression and are used to uncertainty
50% have spent at least five years with their current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 9<br />Definitions 4 of 4<br /><ul><...
Born between 1979 and 1991
The terrorist attacks of 9/11 and 7/7 had an impact on a generation that grew up in a time of relative peace and prosperity
Joined the workforce at the start of or within the economic boom of the past ten years
50% spent less than three years with current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 10<br />Stat attack<br />
Page 11<br /><ul><li>There are 19M people aged over 50 in the UK. By 2021 this is likely to have risen to 24.5M
By 2014 there will be more people over 65 than under 16
Over 1.6M people over 50 live in the Yorkshire and Humber region
Over 500000 people aged between 50 and the state pension age are now employed in the Yorkshire and Humber region
Tests show comprehension and knowledge tends to improve up to the age of 70 while verbal reasoning either improves with ag...
Cognitively some older people perform at well above average according to research and physically active 65 year-olds do as...
Page 12<br />What barriers exist?<br />
Page 13<br /><ul><li>Cost
Attitude of directors
Attitudes of management
Attitudes of workforce
Customer profile
Attitudes of employee representatives
Trade unions</li></ul>What barriers exist?<br />
Page 14<br />What can be done?<br />
Page 15<br /><ul><li>Monitoring age of job applications
Monitoring age of employees
Flexible working policy for older workers
Project/task group on age
Training for managers on age discrimination
Benefits policy without age criteria
Dedicated resource for age discrimination
No compulsory retirement age
Ban on age factors in training
Ban on age factors in promotion
Ban on age factors in recruitment
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Ageism June 2010

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In-house one day training course for a distribution-based business in the North West tackling the non-legal aspects of age diversity and age discrimination.

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Ageism June 2010

  1. 1. Tackling ageism<br />by Fluid <br />June 2010<br />
  2. 2. Page 2<br />Contents<br />3-4 Introduction to Fluid<br />5-9Definitions<br />10-11Stat attack<br />12-13 What barriers exist?<br />14-15What can be done?<br />16-20 Equality Act<br />21-22 Keeping older workers engaged<br />23-26 Managing age diversity<br />27-28 Achieving an all-age workforce<br />29-30 Retirement<br />31-32 Flexible working<br />33-35 Health & Safety <br />36-37 Attraction<br />38-39 Recruitment<br />40-41 Assessment and selection<br />42-43 Graduates<br />44-45 Measurement and monitoring<br />46-47 Communication<br />48-49 Case studies<br />50-51 Conclusion and questions<br />
  3. 3. Page 3<br />Introduction<br />
  4. 4. Page 4<br />Introduction to Fluid<br />Fluid Consulting Limited (Fluid) is a specialist human resources consultancy headed by Tim Holden MCIPD <br />10 years in banking<br />10 years in Human Resources consultancy<br />Fluid trading since 2006<br />The core services provided by Fluid are:<br /><ul><li>Retention
  5. 5. Selection</li></ul>- Attraction<br />- Remuneration & Reward <br />- Outplacement<br />- Training & HR consultancy<br />
  6. 6. Page 5<br />Definitions<br />
  7. 7. Page 6<br />Definitions 1 of 4<br /><ul><li>VETERANS
  8. 8. Born before 1948
  9. 9. Experienced the Second World War in their childhood
  10. 10. Known as traditionalists in the USA
  11. 11. Joined the workforce when job opportunities were abundant
  12. 12. 50% have spent at least ten years with their current employer
  13. 13. 33% have spent more than 20 years with their current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 7<br />Definitions 2 of 4<br /><ul><li>BABY BOOMERS
  14. 14. Born between 1948 and 1963
  15. 15. Experienced a push for civil rights, the womens’ movement, union power and high inflation
  16. 16. Joined the workforce when there was high competition for work and their success has often resulted from long working hours
  17. 17. 50% have spent their last ten years with their current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 8<br />Definitions 3 of 4<br /><ul><li>GENERATION X
  18. 18. Born between 1964 and 1978
  19. 19. ‘Thatcher’s children’
  20. 20. Many graduated into the worst job market since the Depression and are used to uncertainty
  21. 21. 50% have spent at least five years with their current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 9<br />Definitions 4 of 4<br /><ul><li>GENERATION Y
  22. 22. Born between 1979 and 1991
  23. 23. The terrorist attacks of 9/11 and 7/7 had an impact on a generation that grew up in a time of relative peace and prosperity
  24. 24. Joined the workforce at the start of or within the economic boom of the past ten years
  25. 25. 50% spent less than three years with current employer</li></li></ul><li>Page 10<br />Stat attack<br />
  26. 26. Page 11<br /><ul><li>There are 19M people aged over 50 in the UK. By 2021 this is likely to have risen to 24.5M
  27. 27. By 2014 there will be more people over 65 than under 16
  28. 28. Over 1.6M people over 50 live in the Yorkshire and Humber region
  29. 29. Over 500000 people aged between 50 and the state pension age are now employed in the Yorkshire and Humber region
  30. 30. Tests show comprehension and knowledge tends to improve up to the age of 70 while verbal reasoning either improves with age or remains stable
  31. 31. Cognitively some older people perform at well above average according to research and physically active 65 year-olds do as well as active 25 year-olds</li></ul>Stat attack<br />
  32. 32. Page 12<br />What barriers exist?<br />
  33. 33. Page 13<br /><ul><li>Cost
  34. 34. Attitude of directors
  35. 35. Attitudes of management
  36. 36. Attitudes of workforce
  37. 37. Customer profile
  38. 38. Attitudes of employee representatives
  39. 39. Trade unions</li></ul>What barriers exist?<br />
  40. 40. Page 14<br />What can be done?<br />
  41. 41. Page 15<br /><ul><li>Monitoring age of job applications
  42. 42. Monitoring age of employees
  43. 43. Flexible working policy for older workers
  44. 44. Project/task group on age
  45. 45. Training for managers on age discrimination
  46. 46. Benefits policy without age criteria
  47. 47. Dedicated resource for age discrimination
  48. 48. No compulsory retirement age
  49. 49. Ban on age factors in training
  50. 50. Ban on age factors in promotion
  51. 51. Ban on age factors in recruitment
  52. 52. Age discrimination policy</li></ul>What can be done?<br />
  53. 53. Page 16<br />Equality Act<br />
  54. 54. Page 17<br />Equality Act 1 of 4<br /><ul><li>WITH EFFECT FROM OCTOBER 2010
  55. 55. The basic framework of protection against direct and indirect discrimination, harassment and victimisation in services and public functions; premises; work; education; associations, and transport.
  56. 56. Changing the definition of gender reassignment, by removing the requirement for medical supervision.
  57. 57. Levelling up protection for people discriminated against because they are perceived to have, or are associated with someone who has, a protected characteristic, so providing new protection for people like carers. </li></li></ul><li>Page 18<br />Equality Act 2 of 4<br /><ul><li>WITH EFFECT FROM OCTOBER 2010
  58. 58. Clearer protection for breastfeeding mothers; Applying the European definition of indirect discrimination to all protected characteristics.
  59. 59. Extending protection from indirect discrimination to disability.
  60. 60. Introducing a new concept of “discrimination arising from disability”, to replace protection under previous legislation lost as a result of a legal judgment.
  61. 61. Applying the detriment model to victimisation protection (aligning with the approach in employment law). </li></li></ul><li>Page 19<br />Equality Act 3 of 4<br /><ul><li>WITH EFFECT FROM OCTOBER 2010
  62. 62. Harmonising the thresholds for the duty to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people. Extending protection from 3rd party harassment to all protected characteristics. Making it more difficult for disabled people to be unfairly screened out when applying for jobs, by restricting the circumstances in which employers can ask job applicants questions about disability or health.
  63. 63. Allowing claims for direct gender pay discrimination where there is no actual comparator. Making pay secrecy clauses unenforceable. </li></li></ul><li>Page 20<br />Equality Act 4 of 4<br /><ul><li>WITH EFFECT FROM OCTOBER 2010
  64. 64. Extending protection in private clubs to sex, religion or belief, pregnancy and maternity, and gender reassignment. Introducing new powers for employment tribunals to make recommendations which benefit the wider workforce. Harmonising provisions allowing voluntary positive action.</li></li></ul><li>Page 21<br />Keeping older workers engaged<br />
  65. 65. Page 22<br /><ul><li>Start early
  66. 66. Build a career path
  67. 67. Explain options offered by their pension scheme
  68. 68. Value their experience
  69. 69. Offer flexible hours and include part-time/occasional working
  70. 70. Look at sabbaticals
  71. 71. Involve spouses in planning
  72. 72. Weigh up working conditions
  73. 73. Encourage good health
  74. 74. Keep in touch</li></ul>Keeping older workers engaged<br />
  75. 75. Page 5<br />Managing age diversity<br />
  76. 76. Page 24<br /><ul><li>Analyse your workforce profile in terms of age, as well as the future impact of the changing generational mix
  77. 77. Carry out an employee survey and analyse the views and motivations of different age groups
  78. 78. Audit your internal communications channels to assess whether communications channels and styles are sufficiently flexible to meet the preferences of all groups of employees
  79. 79. Ensure your employer brand conveys what is compelling about the organisation as a place to work for different generations
  80. 80. Analyse career development opportunities for all members of the workforce</li></ul>Managing age diversity 1 of 3<br />
  81. 81. Page 25<br /><ul><li>Provide flexible working opportunities that will appeal to employees at different stages of their life
  82. 82. Maximise opportunities to enhance coaching and mentoring across different generational groups
  83. 83. Re-engage baby boomers by ensuring they are given appropriate developmental opportunities
  84. 84. Re-evaluate your corporate social responsibility policies and practices to ensure they have cross-generational appeal
  85. 85. Identify areas of commonality and build on them</li></ul>Managing age diversity 2 of 3<br />
  86. 86. Page 26<br /><ul><li>Avoid making unnecessary allowances
  87. 87. Mix up the generations
  88. 88. Encourage them to swap skills and experiences
  89. 89. Avoid focusing on one particular generation
  90. 90. Make the mixture of age groups a positive thing</li></ul>Managing age diversity 3 of 3<br />
  91. 91. Page 27<br />Achieving an all-age workforce<br />
  92. 92. Page 28<br /><ul><li>Don’t use age as a proxy for skills, ability, experience, potential, attitude, commitment, ambition, motivation and loyalty
  93. 93. Ensure senior managers are trained to be ‘age aware’ and understand the benefits of embracing age diversity. Help younger supervisors and managers understand and acquire the skills to manage and motivate an all-age workforce
  94. 94. Understand the learning styles and preferences of older employees
  95. 95. Help all employees challenge their prejudices by encouraging all-age working
  96. 96. Adopt holistic ‘age management’ policies and practices such as ongoing training, job rotation, flexible working, secondmentsetc which allow employees to maintain their employability
  97. 97. Get rid of any fixed retirement ages</li></ul>Achieving an all-age workforce<br />
  98. 98. Page 29<br />Retirement<br />
  99. 99. Page 30<br /><ul><li>Working without a retirement age
  100. 100. Working with a retirement age
  101. 101. Don’t….</li></ul>Retirement<br />
  102. 102. Page 31<br />Flexible working<br />
  103. 103. Page 32<br /><ul><li>Part-time working
  104. 104. Job-sharing
  105. 105. Flexitime
  106. 106. Compressed hours
  107. 107. Annual hours
  108. 108. Working from home
  109. 109. Mobile working and teleworking
  110. 110. Flexible retirement
  111. 111. Benidorm leave
  112. 112. Seasonal employment</li></ul>Flexible working<br />
  113. 113. Page 33<br />Health & safety<br />
  114. 114. Page 34<br /><ul><li>Ensure a job’s physical requirements are clearly specified during recruitment and interviewing
  115. 115. Carry out risk assessments routinely not just when an employee reaches a certain age
  116. 116. Assess the activities involved in jobs and modify workplace design if necessary
  117. 117. Make adjustments on the basis of individual and business needs, not on age
  118. 118. Consider modifying tasks to help people stay in work longer, such as shifting responsibilities from physically strenuous to mentally challenging</li></ul>Health & Safety 1 of 2<br />
  119. 119. Page 35<br /><ul><li>Allow staff to change work hours and job content
  120. 120. Don’t assume that certain jobs are too demanding for older workers
  121. 121. Encourage or provide regular health checks for all employees, regardless of age
  122. 122. Persuade staff to take an interest in their health and fitness
  123. 123. Consider other legislative duties, such as the DDA or flexible working legislation</li></ul>Health & Safety 2 of 2<br />
  124. 124. Page 36<br />Attraction<br />
  125. 125. Page 37<br /><ul><li>Remove from advertisements all age limits and requests for particular amounts of experience, unless clearly justified
  126. 126. Remove age-related terminology such as ‘junior’
  127. 127. Think about whether you are limiting the reach of your advertising through the channels that you use
  128. 128. Offer flexible working practices to attract older and younger workers
  129. 129. Create links with the community to reach particular age groups
  130. 130. Pay some attention to your brand as an employer and promote the fact that you welcome employees of all ages</li></ul>Attraction<br />
  131. 131. Page 38<br />Recruitment<br />
  132. 132. Page 39<br /><ul><li>Consider whether the date of birth and other indicators of age, such as the dates of qualifications and work experience, are necessary on the application form
  133. 133. Remove the dates from CVs before passing them on to the people doing the assessing
  134. 134. Ask for particular types of experience rather than the length of experience in the person specification
  135. 135. Discuss the demands of the age legislation with agencies, and update contracts with these providers if necessary
  136. 136. Put in place systems by which the performance of agencies on attracting age-diverse applicants can be monitored and ensure they understand that the success of their contract will be partly measured upon this</li></ul>Recruitment<br />
  137. 137. Page 40<br />Assessment and selection<br />
  138. 138. Page 41<br /><ul><li>Use objective, criteria-based assessment and selection techniques
  139. 139. Try to ensure that those doing initial screening don’t know the applicants’ ages
  140. 140. Consider using electronic screening for the first screening stages
  141. 141. Consider using telephone interviews to remove age from the equation
  142. 142. Take notes at each stage of the process
  143. 143. Use clear job descriptions
  144. 144. Ensure recruiters and assessors are trained well so that they don’t discriminate on the grounds of age when assessing and selecting candidates</li></ul>Assessment and selection<br />
  145. 145. Page 42<br />Graduates<br />
  146. 146. Page 43<br /><ul><li>Remove any limits based on age or year of graduation from the entry requirements to a graduate scheme
  147. 147. Ensure that the programme is advertised widely enough to reach graduates of all ages and establish links with a wide range of universities so that you reach a correspondingly wide range of undergraduates and graduates
  148. 148. Don’t rely solely on UCAS points as entry criteria
  149. 149. Consider how your graduate programme is branded-will it be perceived as accessible to graduates of all ages?
  150. 150. Consider how people can enter your organisation. Have you got a variety of entry points?</li></ul>Graduates<br />
  151. 151. Page 44<br />Measurement and monitoring<br />
  152. 152. Page 45<br /><ul><li>Add an equal opportunities form that includes age to your application pack or online recruitment system
  153. 153. Record the age of applicants at each stage of the application process
  154. 154. Consider setting up as working group or similar to examine this data in a systematic fashion
  155. 155. Use the data to identify any areas of potential discrimination so that these can be addressed
  156. 156. Don’t just measure-take appropriate action
  157. 157. Maintain confidentiality
  158. 158. Review your monitoring system to ensure it remains fit for purpose</li></ul>Measurement and monitoring<br />
  159. 159. Page 46<br />Communication<br />
  160. 160. Page 47<br /><ul><li>Make sure that all managers and employees who are involved with recruitment are aware of the impact of legislation
  161. 161. Produce a list of ‘dos and don’ts’ for agencies
  162. 162. Use as many channels of communication as possible-email, the Internet, staff briefings, videoconferencing, podcasts, newsletters, notice boards and so on
  163. 163. Provide diversity training that includes age
  164. 164. Reinforce messages with clear actions of policies are breached
  165. 165. Sustain communication</li></ul>Communication<br />
  166. 166. Page 48<br />Case studies<br />
  167. 167. Page 49<br />Case studies <br />
  168. 168. Page 50<br />Conclusion & Questions<br />
  169. 169. Page 51<br />Conclusion<br />Summary<br />Questions<br />

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