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T carse ESOL_October_2013_3D_Research_presentation

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ESOL PD presentation for the class "Engaging Students in 3-Dimensional Research" on 4 & 5 October, 2013 in Dubai, UAE.

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T carse ESOL_October_2013_3D_Research_presentation

  1. 1. Engaging Secondary Students in “Three Dimensional Research” “How to fit a square peg in a round hole”. . . successfully. Tim Carse Secondary Librarian, Cairo English School ESOL Dubai Professional Development Conference, 2013
  2. 2. Where we need to go today . . .
  3. 3. My goals and outcomes for our time together: 1. My Presentation What is Research? A look at the past and present. How does today’s digital classroom force educators to reevaluate basic research methods and desired outcomes? The information process model Information Literacy Models
  4. 4. My goals and outcomes for our time together: 2. Your discussion, in small groups . . . 1. Generate personal definitions of research; 2. Document brief statements of group members own experiences with secondary students and research and; 3. Record any “best practices” and pedagogical tips that have worked for teachers in their own classrooms.
  5. 5. My goals and outcomes for our time together: 3. Our Collective Reflections . . . We reconvene and share the information as a large group. We will document reflections for everyone using Google docs Conclusions How educators can leverage today’s technology to mentor, teach, and engage students to conduct quality and effective research.
  6. 6. My goals and outcomes for our time together: 4. Any collective conclusions? A list of teaching strategies, ideas, and pedagogy to assist us in achieving the goal of engaging students in quality “three dimensional” research.
  7. 7. Our Online Resource for this presentation: http://3dresearch.weebly.com/
  8. 8. Finding a way to fit a square peg in a round hole . . .
  9. 9. Changes in the way we do research We used to . . . Have card catalogues Books made only of paper No Internet or easy world-wide communication No electronic databases And inter-library loans were costly and took time (physical books loaned and moved about)
  10. 10. Changes in the way we do research Today we have . . . Card catalogues that are in the cloud Print and non-print media in various formats The Internet and instant communication world-wide Powerful electronic databases Electronic means of sharing information
  11. 11. And our students have changed too . . . Source: http://thesocialmediatrainee.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/digital-natives- vs-digital-immigrants/
  12. 12. Source: http://thesocialmediatrainee.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/digital-natives- vs-digital-immigrants/
  13. 13. How does all of this impact, or change, the nature of students’ research?
  14. 14. The Pew Study: How Teens Do Research in the Digital World The Pew Institute conducted an online survey between March 7 & April 23, 2012:  2,462 middle and high school teachers  1,750 were from a sample of AP teachers  712 from a sample of Nat’l Writing Project teachers  Teachers from the USA, Puerto Rico, and US Virgin Islands were surveyed  Also online and in-person focus groups of teachers, grades 9-12 (Nov. 2011 and Feb. 2012)
  15. 15. From the Pew Study Summary of Findings ¾ of AP and NWP teachers believe that the Internet and digital search tools: Have a “mostly positive” impact on students’ research habits But, 87% stated these technologies are “creating an easily distracted generation with short attention spans And, 64% say today’s digital technologies “do more to distract students than help them academically” Source: Page 3 of the report
  16. 16. From the Pew Study Summary of Findings Emerging concerns of some teachers about their students (p. 3): An overdependence on search engines Difficulty judging the quality of online information General level of student literacy Increasing distractions “pulling” at students Poor time management skills Diminished critical thinking capacity Ease of borrowing from the work of others
  17. 17. From the Pew Study Summary of Findings The Internet has changed the very meaning of “research” – A few key comments by teachers regarding some of the effects of today’s digital environment: The nature of “research” has changed What it means “to do research” has changed For many students today, “research” = Googling
  18. 18. From the Pew Study Summary of Findings And some teachers report that for today’s students: . . . “doing research” has shifted from a relatively slow process of intellectual curiosity and discovery to a fast-paced, short-term exercise aimed at locating just enough information to complete an assignment. Source: Pew report, pgs. 3-4.
  19. 19. From the Pew Study Summary of Findings And on the following slide: In descending order, the sources teacher in our [the Pew] survey say students are “very likely” to use in a typical research assignment . . . Source: Pew report, p. 4.
  20. 20.  Google or other online search engine (94%)  Wikipedia or other online encyclopedia (75%)  YouTube or other social media sites (52%)  Their peers (42%)  Spark Notes, Cliff Notes, or other study guides (41%)  News sites of major news organizations (25%)  Print or electronic textbooks (18%)  Online databases such as EBSCO, JSTOR, or Grolier (17%)  A research librarian at their school or public library (16%)  Printed books other than textbooks (12%)  Student-oriented search engines such as Sweet Search
  21. 21.  Google or other online search engine (94%)  Wikipedia or other online encyclopedia (75%)  YouTube or other social media sites (52%)  Their peers (42%)  Spark Notes, Cliff Notes, or other study guides (41%) So what do these statistics suggest relative to the majority of Digital Natives,
  22. 22.  News sites of major news organizations (25%)  Print or electronic textbooks (18%)  Online databases such as EBSCO, JSTOR, or Grolier (17%)  A research librarian at their school or public library (16%)  Printed books other than textbooks (12%)  Student-oriented search engines such as Sweet Search (10%) . . . when juxtaposed to these statistics that may relate more to Digital Immigrants (and a minority of digital natives)?
  23. 23. So what does this actually information suggest? Do digital immigrants v. natives have different thinking and philosophies? Are teachers’ just wrestling with the place of technology in education? Is this a generational trend? What about “easy” research v. “hard” research? Our increasing dependency on technology? Is there a lack of traditional research resources?
  24. 24. A look into the research process
  25. 25. The basic Input, Process, Output (IPO) Model Input A process Some type of output
  26. 26. The basic Input, Process, Output (IPO) Model in the ideal educational world . . . Inputs: digital, printed, multi- media, other Students use some type of information model Output: an authentic, genuine, research artifact
  27. 27. The basic Input, Process, Output (IPO) Model in the real educational world . . . Inputs Process Output Less than desirable; does not promote student learning From only one source: Google? Worth of sources? Hormones Adolescence Research- Anxiety Student Apathy
  28. 28. Carol Collier Kuhlthau Professor II Emerita Department of Library and Information Science, Rutgers University Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries (CISSL) A pioneer researcher in the area of understanding the information search process and the emotive aspects of student research and learning
  29. 29. Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process (ISP) Model Noted as one of the most significant contributions in teaching the process approach to student reserach The only theoretical model that has been empirically tested Value of her model has been demonstrated for over 20 years Subsequent research has identified gender differences
  30. 30. Kuhlthau’s ISP Model Source: http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~kuhlthau/information_search_process.htm
  31. 31. 7 Stages of the ISP Model 1. Task Initiation 2. Topic Selection 3. Topic Exploration 4. Focus Formulation 5. Resource collection 6. Presentation 7. Assessment Source: Nancy Pickering Thomas, et al. 2011. 3rd ed. “Information Literacy and Information Skills Instruction.” Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, p. 136.
  32. 32. The ISP Model focuses on the emotive aspects in process research (1): Affective Level: Feelings that parallel ISP Model Source: Nancy Pickering Thomas, et al. 2011. 3rd ed. “Information Literacy and Information Skills Instruction.” Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, p. 136. 1. Anxiety; uncertainty 2. Optimism 3. Confusion; frustration; doubt 4. Clarity; interest 5. Confidence 6. Satisfaction; relief; disappointment 7. Positive or negative feelings
  33. 33. The ISP Model focuses on the emotive aspects in process research (2): Ambiguity Specificity Cognitive Level: Thinking Activities Source: Nancy Pickering Thomas, et al. 2011. 3rd ed. “Information Literacy and Information Skills Instruction.” Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, p. 136.
  34. 34. The ISP Model focuses on the emotive aspects in process research (3): Seeking Relevant Information Seeking Pertinent Information Behavioral Level: Actions Source: Nancy Pickering Thomas, et al. 2011. 3rd ed. “Information Literacy and Information Skills Instruction.” Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, p. 136.
  35. 35. The ISP Model focuses on the emotive aspects in process research (4): Moods Invitational Indicative Source: Nancy Pickering Thomas, et al. 2011. 3rd ed. “Information Literacy and Information Skills Instruction.” Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, p. 136.
  36. 36. A brief look at a few Information Literacy Models Irving’s 9-Step Model for Assignment Completion The Big6 The Super3 REACTS I-Search Yucht’s FLIP-IT Source: Thomas, “Information Literacy, 3e,” p. 59-76. [slides recreated from figures in Chapter 4]
  37. 37. Ann Irving’s 9-Step Model 1. Defining Tasks “What do I need to do?” 2. Considering Sources “Where do I go?” 3. Finding Resources “How do I get the information?” 4. Making Selections “Which resources shall I use?” 5. Effective Use “How shall I use the resources?” 6. Making Records “What shall I make a record of?” 7. Making Sense “Have I got the information I need?” 8. Presenting Work “How should I present it?” 9. Assessing Progress “What have I achieved?
  38. 38. Big6 Skills and the Super3 – Eisenberg & Berkowitz • 1. Task Definition • 2. Information-seeking strategies 1. Plan • 3. Location and Access • 4. Use of Information2. DO • 5. Synthesis • 6. Evaluation3. Review
  39. 39. REACTS by Barbara K. Stripling & Judy M. Pitts Level 1 Fact-Finding Reporting on the information Recalling Level 2 Asking and Searching Posing who, what, where, and when questions and finding answers Explaining Level 3 Examining and Organizing Posing why and how problems and organizing information to fit the project Analyzing Level 4 Evaluating and Deliberating Judging information on the basis of authority, significance, etc. Challenging Level 5 Integrating and Concluding Drawing conclusions and creating a personal perspective based on information obtained Transforming Level 6 Conceptualizing Creating original solutions to problems posed Synthesizing
  40. 40. I-Search by Joyce and Tallman • Explanation of I-Search Process; Webbing activities to pinpoint student interest; preliminary investigation of library resources; conferencing w/ teacher/librarian; sharing topic choice with peers and parents Step 1: Topic Choice • Generating research questions; background reading; Preparing bibliographies; in-depth reading; interviewing Step 2: Finding Information • Highlighting text; double-entry drafting; reflecting and conferencing; using learning logs Step 3: Using information • Using the first person; telling about search; using learning logs; editing by peers; transferring the research Step 4: Preparing the I-Search Product
  41. 41. FLIP IT! by Alice H. Yucht Focus • FOCUS: What is the real question/problem I need to work on at this time? Links • LOGISTICS: What "connections" can I use to make this activity as efficient and effective as possible? Input • IMPLEMENTATION: What really needs to be done? and how will it need to be accomplished? Payoff • PROOF: What should the final results be? and it! is shorthand for IF/THEN: the fundamental question which underlies every other decision and activity in this process. Additional Source: Yucht, Alice H. 2000. STRATEGY: FLIP IT! For Collaborative Planning Strategies. Teacher Librarian, Sept 2000, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p48. 3p.
  42. 42. Relationships among the models Source: Milam, P. (2004). A Road Map for the Journey. Library Media Connection, 22(7), 20.
  43. 43. Evaluating Websites and Online Sources A template for evaluation purposes WWWDOT
  44. 44. Criteria to use in online information evaluation Suggested criteria to be evaluated: 1. The authority of author 2. The website content 3. Evidence of bias 4. Evidence of the authenticity of information, 5. The quality of presentation, and; 6. Currency [of information: Is it up to date?] Source: Zhang, Shenglan, Duke, Nell K., & Jimenez, Laura M. (2011). The WWWDOT Approach to Improving Students' Critical Evaluation of Websites. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 65 Issue 2 pp. 150–158 DOI:10.1002/TRTR.01016
  45. 45. Applying the Template: The WWWDOT Model 1. Who wrote this and what credentials do they have? 2. Why was it written? 3. When was it written? 4. Does it help meet my needs? 5. Organization of the site? 6. To-do list for the future. Source: Zhang, Shenglan, Duke, Nell K., & Jimenez, Laura M. (2011). The WWWDOT Approach to Improving Students' Critical Evaluation of Websites. The Reading Teacher, Vol. 65 Issue 2 pp. 150–158 DOI:10.1002/TRTR.01016
  46. 46. Your thoughts, opinions, war stories, and feedback is needed!
  47. 47. What do you think? Our observations and thoughts will be added to our Website for all to see after this class.
  48. 48. Thanks for signing up and participating! Have a great time for the remainder of our inaugural PD conference!

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