Public Involvement WorkshopPublic Involvement Workshop
March 20, 2014March 20, 2014
• Workshop Goal:
– Present Analysis of 3 conceptual restoration designs and
invite questions
• Workshop Objectives:
Public...
Conceptual Restoration Plan Progress Update
Planning Process
1. Collect data on existing conditions
2. Compile and analyze...
Land Ownership of Entire LCW Complex
Studebaker LLC
In February of 2006, a joint powers agreement was
adopted among the:
Rivers & Mountains Conservancy, State Coastal Conserv...
Project Organization Chart
Community Technical Advisory
Steering Committee:
RMC, Coastal Conservancy,
Cities of Seal and L...
Technical Advisory Committee
Members of each of these organizations provide regular
advising throughout this project:
• Ri...
• Workshop Goal was:
– Present 3 conceptual restoration designs
• Workshop Objectives:
Public Involvement Workshop #5
Them...
Alt 1
•Minor changes to existing oil infrastructure
•Utilize/improve existing tidal connections
•Minor grading
•Transition...
Alt 2
•Consolidate oil infrastructure
•New tidal connections to SGR and Haynes
•Steam Shovel Slough expansion
•Moderate gr...
Alt 3
•Consolidate oil infrastructure
•New tidal connections to SGR, Haynes, &
Los Cerritos Channel
•Fill & Grading of OC ...
Alternatives Analyses
Primary processes analyzed and reported tonight are:
• Hydrology
• Habitat
• Public access
Additiona...
Results of the Analyses
• Hydrology – Chris Webb
• Habitat – Matt James
• Public Access/Interpretive Opportunities – Clark...
Hydrology
Moffatt & Nichol
Chris Webb
Sub-Areas
Grading Plans
Cross-Sections
Tidal Elevations and Ranges
All Scenarios, No Sea Level Rise (Existing Sea
Level)
Tidal Elevations and Ranges
All Scenarios, +1.5 Feet of Sea Level Rise
Tidal Elevations and Ranges
All Scenarios, +5.5 Feet of Sea Level Rise
Tidal Hydrology – Tidal Inundation Frequency
At Steam Shovel Slough, Existing Sea Level
TIF Relates to Elevation –
Determines
Habitat Distributions and
Areas – Alt 1, North and
Central Areas, Existing Sea
Level
Alt 1, Isthmus and
Southeast Area,
Existing Sea Level
Habitat Distributions–
Alt 1, North and
Central Areas, Sea
Level Rise of +1.5
Feet
Alt 1, Isthmus and
Southeast Area, Sea Level
Rise of +1.5 Feet
Habitat Distributions –
Alt 1, North and
Central Areas, Sea
Level Rise of +5.5 Feet
Alt 1, Isthmus and Southeast
Area, Sea Level Rise of +5.5
Feet
Alt 2 - Moderate Alt
Northern and Central Areas,
Existing Sea Level
Alt 2 - Moderate Alt
Isthmus and Southeast
Area, Existing Sea Level
Alt 2 - Moderate Alt
Northern and Central Areas,
Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
Alt 2 - Moderate Alt
Isthmus and Southeast
Area,
Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
Alt 2 - Moderate Alt
Northern and Central Areas,
Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
Alt 2 - Moderate Alt
Isthmus and Southeast
Area,
Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
Alt 3 - Maximum Alt
Northern and Central Areas,
Existing Sea Level
Alt 3 - Maximum Alt
Isthmus and Southeast
Area,
Existing Sea Level
Alt 3 - Maximum Alt
Northern and Central Areas,
Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
Alt 3 - Maximum Alt
Isthmus and Southeast
Area,
Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
Alt 3 - Maximum Alt
Northern and Central Areas,
Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
Alt 3 - Maximum Alt
Isthmus and Southeast
Area,
Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
Tidal Hydrology Data Used to Analyze Habitat
• Habitat Distributions
• Habitat Areas
• Habitat Evolution Under Sea Level R...
Habitats
Coastal Restoration Consultants
Matt James and Dave Hubbard
Habitat Modeling
• Practical questions
– How does SLR affect habitat distributions?
– How does plumbing affect habitats?
–...
Modeled Habitats
Habitat Categories Examples
Sub-tidal Deep, shallow and eelgrass
Mudflat Unvegetated
Low marsh Cordgrass
...
SLR Resilience
Current Sea Level
+1.5 Feet SLR
+5.5 Feet SLR
Lesson #1: Sea Level Rise
• Moderate SLR
– Topography sufficient to provide resilience
– Thoughtful grading of adjacent up...
Tidal Connections: Culverts
-4	
-3	
-2	
-1	
0	
1	
2	
3	
4	
5	
6	
0	 50	 100	 150	 200	 250	 300	 350	 400	 450	 500	
Series1	
Series2	
Series3	
6	
8	
...
Non-linear Habitat Conversion
Lesson #2: Culverts
• Must be carefully designed
• Likely to lead to muted and perched tides
– Culvert size and invert ele...
Three Alternatives: Summary
Sub-tidal
Mudflat
Low marsh
Mid marsh
High marsh
Transition zoneTransition zone
Upland
Mixed FW
wetland
Brackish marsh
Oil...
Minimum Alternative
• Resilient to moderate SLR
• Culverts = funky hydrology
• Fragmented habitats
• “Unnatural” topograph...
Moderate Alternative
• Resilient to moderate SLR*
• Some resilience to significant SLR*
• More salt marsh than Minimum Alt...
Maximum Alternative
• Maximization of salt marsh habitat
• Most sub-tidal and mudflat
• Generally steep wetland-upland tra...
Lesson #3: Preferred Alternative?
• Best design is probably a blending of different aspects of
different alternatives
• No...
Lots of Project-specific Fine Tuning Still Needed
• Soil contamination
• Soil texture
– Will it need to be amended? Import...
Public Access
New West Land Company
Clark Stevens
FLOWS: Existing Perimeter and Interior Circulation
Connectivity and Fragmentation
Urban connectivity primary
Interpretive Center + Habitat Corridor + Revenue
Urban connectivity primary
Heron Pointe to Zedler: Interior Path Opportunity
Habitat function primary
Urban connectivity primary
FLOW + IDENTITY: Blurring the Boundaries
MARKETPLACE MARSH- Learning Landscape
Habitat function primary
Habitat function primary
Urban connectivity primary
Habitat function primary
Habitat function primary
Urban connectivity primary
Next Steps
• Finalize report that presents the restoration
alternatives analyses and summarizes the project
findingsfindin...
Intoloscerritoswetlands.org
Closing / Leave BehindFinal Questions?Final Questions?
Visit:
intoloscerritoswetlands.org
or
Contact:
info@tidalinfluence....
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6
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LCW Conceptual Restoration Workshop #6

  1. 1. Public Involvement WorkshopPublic Involvement Workshop March 20, 2014March 20, 2014
  2. 2. • Workshop Goal: – Present Analysis of 3 conceptual restoration designs and invite questions • Workshop Objectives: Public Involvement Workshop #6 Theme: Life Mascot: Western Snowy Plover Color: Light Green • Workshop Objectives: 1. Update Conceptual Restoration Plan’s progress 2. Share 3 conceptual restoration designs 3. Present results of Alternative Analysis 4. Answer questions • Workshop Ground Rules
  3. 3. Conceptual Restoration Plan Progress Update Planning Process 1. Collect data on existing conditions 2. Compile and analyze opportunities and constraints to restoration 3. Meet with the Public to brainstorm potential restoration3. Meet with the Public to brainstorm potential restoration alternatives 4. Determine preliminary restoration alternatives 5. Meet with Technical Advisory Committee and Public to identify final alternatives 6. Analyze each of the final restoration alternatives 7. Report results of restoration alternatives analyses and summarize the project findings
  4. 4. Land Ownership of Entire LCW Complex Studebaker LLC
  5. 5. In February of 2006, a joint powers agreement was adopted among the: Rivers & Mountains Conservancy, State Coastal Conservancy, & Cities of Long Beach & Seal Beach Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority = These agencies comprise the project’s Steering Committee
  6. 6. Project Organization Chart Community Technical Advisory Steering Committee: RMC, Coastal Conservancy, Cities of Seal and Long Beach Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority: Project Manager Consulting Team Community Stakeholders Public Involvement Plan Technical Advisory Committee Staff from Applicable Public Agencies
  7. 7. Technical Advisory Committee Members of each of these organizations provide regular advising throughout this project: • Rivers and Mountains Conservancy • California Coastal Conservancy • City of Long Beach • City of Seal Beach • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service • NOAA-National Marine Fisheries Service • Counties of Los Angeles & Orange• Counties of Los Angeles & Orange • US Army Corps Of Engineers • Regional Water Quality Control Board • California Department of Fish and Wildlife • California Coastal Commission • State Lands Commission • Southern California Water Resources Research Project • Port of Long Beach • Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission • CSU Long Beach, Dept of Biological Sciences
  8. 8. • Workshop Goal was: – Present 3 conceptual restoration designs • Workshop Objectives: Public Involvement Workshop #5 Theme: Fire Mascot: Coulter’s Goldfield Color: Red • Workshop Objectives: – Update on Conceptual Restoration Plan’s progress – Share 3 conceptual restoration designs – Discuss NEXT STEPS – Perform workshop activity to generate feedback on restoration design alternatives • Workshop Ground Rules
  9. 9. Alt 1 •Minor changes to existing oil infrastructure •Utilize/improve existing tidal connections •Minor grading •Transitional & upland habitat along perimeters •Potential interpretive sites on OTD and/or State lands parcels Note: trail locations are in draft form
  10. 10. Alt 2 •Consolidate oil infrastructure •New tidal connections to SGR and Haynes •Steam Shovel Slough expansion •Moderate grading •Transitional & upland habitat along perimeters •Potential interpretive sites on OTD and/or State lands parcels Note: trail locations are in draft form
  11. 11. Alt 3 •Consolidate oil infrastructure •New tidal connections to SGR, Haynes, & Los Cerritos Channel •Fill & Grading of OC Retention Basin •Significant grading to remove fill material and create contiguous tidal channels •Maximizes tidal salt marsh habitat •Potential interpretive sites on OTD and/or State lands parcels Note: trail locations are in draft form
  12. 12. Alternatives Analyses Primary processes analyzed and reported tonight are: • Hydrology • Habitat • Public access Additional items addressed in the reportAdditional items addressed in the report • Preliminary engineering designs • Infrastructure changes • Phasing • Possible construction methods • Maintenance • Consistency with project goals and objectives
  13. 13. Results of the Analyses • Hydrology – Chris Webb • Habitat – Matt James • Public Access/Interpretive Opportunities – Clark Stevens• Public Access/Interpretive Opportunities – Clark Stevens
  14. 14. Hydrology Moffatt & Nichol Chris Webb
  15. 15. Sub-Areas
  16. 16. Grading Plans Cross-Sections
  17. 17. Tidal Elevations and Ranges All Scenarios, No Sea Level Rise (Existing Sea Level)
  18. 18. Tidal Elevations and Ranges All Scenarios, +1.5 Feet of Sea Level Rise
  19. 19. Tidal Elevations and Ranges All Scenarios, +5.5 Feet of Sea Level Rise
  20. 20. Tidal Hydrology – Tidal Inundation Frequency At Steam Shovel Slough, Existing Sea Level
  21. 21. TIF Relates to Elevation – Determines Habitat Distributions and Areas – Alt 1, North and Central Areas, Existing Sea Level
  22. 22. Alt 1, Isthmus and Southeast Area, Existing Sea Level
  23. 23. Habitat Distributions– Alt 1, North and Central Areas, Sea Level Rise of +1.5 Feet
  24. 24. Alt 1, Isthmus and Southeast Area, Sea Level Rise of +1.5 Feet
  25. 25. Habitat Distributions – Alt 1, North and Central Areas, Sea Level Rise of +5.5 Feet
  26. 26. Alt 1, Isthmus and Southeast Area, Sea Level Rise of +5.5 Feet
  27. 27. Alt 2 - Moderate Alt Northern and Central Areas, Existing Sea Level
  28. 28. Alt 2 - Moderate Alt Isthmus and Southeast Area, Existing Sea Level
  29. 29. Alt 2 - Moderate Alt Northern and Central Areas, Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
  30. 30. Alt 2 - Moderate Alt Isthmus and Southeast Area, Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
  31. 31. Alt 2 - Moderate Alt Northern and Central Areas, Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
  32. 32. Alt 2 - Moderate Alt Isthmus and Southeast Area, Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
  33. 33. Alt 3 - Maximum Alt Northern and Central Areas, Existing Sea Level
  34. 34. Alt 3 - Maximum Alt Isthmus and Southeast Area, Existing Sea Level
  35. 35. Alt 3 - Maximum Alt Northern and Central Areas, Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
  36. 36. Alt 3 - Maximum Alt Isthmus and Southeast Area, Sea Level Rise of 1.5’
  37. 37. Alt 3 - Maximum Alt Northern and Central Areas, Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
  38. 38. Alt 3 - Maximum Alt Isthmus and Southeast Area, Sea Level Rise of 5.5’
  39. 39. Tidal Hydrology Data Used to Analyze Habitat • Habitat Distributions • Habitat Areas • Habitat Evolution Under Sea Level Rise
  40. 40. Habitats Coastal Restoration Consultants Matt James and Dave Hubbard
  41. 41. Habitat Modeling • Practical questions – How does SLR affect habitat distributions? – How does plumbing affect habitats? – How do alternatives differ? • Philosophical questions – What is the ideal mix of habitats today? – In 50yrs? – In 100yrs?
  42. 42. Modeled Habitats Habitat Categories Examples Sub-tidal Deep, shallow and eelgrass Mudflat Unvegetated Low marsh Cordgrass Mid marsh Pickleweed, marsh plain High marsh Glasswort, salt panne Transition zone Wetland-upland ecotone Upland Dune, CSS, grassland Mixed freshwater wetland Seasonal, bioswales, riparian Brackish marsh Artificial, natural? Oil operations Roads and pads, unvegetated
  43. 43. SLR Resilience
  44. 44. Current Sea Level
  45. 45. +1.5 Feet SLR
  46. 46. +5.5 Feet SLR
  47. 47. Lesson #1: Sea Level Rise • Moderate SLR – Topography sufficient to provide resilience – Thoughtful grading of adjacent uplands • Significant SLR – Topography not sufficient for adaption to 5.5 ft. of SLR– Topography not sufficient for adaption to 5.5 ft. of SLR – Big temporal tradeoffs – wetlands now or in the future – Sedimentation will be needed to preserve current salt marshes over the next 100 years
  48. 48. Tidal Connections: Culverts
  49. 49. -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Series1 Series2 Series3 6 8 10 12 Series1 Series2 Current Sea Level +5.5 ft. SLR -5 -4 0 2 4 6 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Series2 Series3 +1.5 ft. SLR San Gabriel River Node 2
  50. 50. Non-linear Habitat Conversion
  51. 51. Lesson #2: Culverts • Must be carefully designed • Likely to lead to muted and perched tides – Culvert size and invert elevation – Narrowing and elimination of habitat zones • Adequate designs now might not be adequate with SLR• Adequate designs now might not be adequate with SLR • Habitat conversion may not behave linearly with SLR (models may not be sufficient) • Open channels generally don’t have these issues
  52. 52. Three Alternatives: Summary
  53. 53. Sub-tidal Mudflat Low marsh Mid marsh High marsh Transition zoneTransition zone Upland Mixed FW wetland Brackish marsh Oil operations
  54. 54. Minimum Alternative • Resilient to moderate SLR • Culverts = funky hydrology • Fragmented habitats • “Unnatural” topography • Compatible with oil operations?• Compatible with oil operations? – Raising roads/pads = filling wetlands? – Vegetation-free buffers?
  55. 55. Moderate Alternative • Resilient to moderate SLR* • Some resilience to significant SLR* • More salt marsh than Minimum Alt at current sea level • More natural topography than Minimum Alt
  56. 56. Maximum Alternative • Maximization of salt marsh habitat • Most sub-tidal and mudflat • Generally steep wetland-upland transitions • Significant loss of high marsh and transition habitat with moderate SLRwith moderate SLR • Significant loss of vegetated marsh with significant SLR
  57. 57. Lesson #3: Preferred Alternative? • Best design is probably a blending of different aspects of different alternatives • Not all possibilities captured – More sub-tidal (fish, turtles, some birds) – Entire levee removal– Entire levee removal – Hydro connection between north and central areas
  58. 58. Lots of Project-specific Fine Tuning Still Needed • Soil contamination • Soil texture – Will it need to be amended? Import good soil? • Groundwater • Beneficial re-use of graded soils on site?• Beneficial re-use of graded soils on site?
  59. 59. Public Access New West Land Company Clark Stevens
  60. 60. FLOWS: Existing Perimeter and Interior Circulation
  61. 61. Connectivity and Fragmentation
  62. 62. Urban connectivity primary
  63. 63. Interpretive Center + Habitat Corridor + Revenue
  64. 64. Urban connectivity primary
  65. 65. Heron Pointe to Zedler: Interior Path Opportunity
  66. 66. Habitat function primary
  67. 67. Urban connectivity primary
  68. 68. FLOW + IDENTITY: Blurring the Boundaries
  69. 69. MARKETPLACE MARSH- Learning Landscape
  70. 70. Habitat function primary
  71. 71. Habitat function primary
  72. 72. Urban connectivity primary
  73. 73. Habitat function primary
  74. 74. Habitat function primary
  75. 75. Urban connectivity primary
  76. 76. Next Steps • Finalize report that presents the restoration alternatives analyses and summarizes the project findingsfindings • Prepare project for preliminary engineering and subsequent environmental review
  77. 77. Intoloscerritoswetlands.org
  78. 78. Closing / Leave BehindFinal Questions?Final Questions? Visit: intoloscerritoswetlands.org or Contact: info@tidalinfluence.com

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