Is there a health difference between dried fed and raw fed domestic dogs?                                      <br />Disse...
Abstract<br />Comparing the health of domestic dogs on a raw diet to that of those fed conventional dried pet food. <br />...
Introduction<br />A comparison of the health benefits of a conventional dried diet and a raw diet in domestic dogs.<br />H...
Literature Review<br />The Pet Food Industry<br />Recommendations of nutrients per 400 kcal of food (Kelly, N. & Wills, J....
Pottenger’s Cats (1983)<br />Monumental Study of carnivore nutrition in which stray cats were studied for 10 yrs, the only...
Anatomy/Physiology<br />Carnivores lack the dentition (Goody, 1997) & sufficient amylase production (Stevens & Hume, 1995)...
Justification<br />The market share has transferred from tinned food to dried food by 71% between 2000 & 2009(PFMA, 2010)<...
Methodology<br />A number of dogs in a same breed rescue were placed on a dried diet for 4 weeks, and then a raw diet for ...
Ethics & Risks<br />Ethics:<br />1) Should any dog have an adverse reaction to any of the diets, they are immediately to b...
References<br />Baggerly, C. (2009) Vitamin D Deficiency - Treatment and Diagnosis [Health and Medicine] [Professional Med...
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Dissertation Proposal - Is there a health difference between dried fed and raw fed domestic dogs?

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Dissertation Proposal - Is there a health difference between dried fed and raw fed domestic dogs?

  1. 1. Is there a health difference between dried fed and raw fed domestic dogs? <br />Dissertation Proposal<br />Hope Turner<br />23/09/2011<br />
  2. 2. Abstract<br />Comparing the health of domestic dogs on a raw diet to that of those fed conventional dried pet food. <br />Concluding that domestic dogs are healthier on……….<br />(Turner, 2008)<br />Many thanks to Wanda McCormick for help & advice, KeythorpeRottie Rescue for use of their dogs, Moulton College & Northampton University.<br />
  3. 3. Introduction<br />A comparison of the health benefits of a conventional dried diet and a raw diet in domestic dogs.<br />Hypothesis<br />There are no health benefits to raw feeding domestic dogs verses feeding a dried conventional diet.<br />There are health benefits to raw feeding domestic dogs verses feeding a dried conventional diet.<br />
  4. 4. Literature Review<br />The Pet Food Industry<br />Recommendations of nutrients per 400 kcal of food (Kelly, N. & Wills, J. 1996 )<br />this list only details, 5 of the 7 major minerals, (generally required in large amounts by all animals), 6 of 10 essential trace minerals, 12 vitamins, fat and protein content and 1 fatty acid. <br />Claims against raw food:<br />excesses of Vitamin D in raw food (Case et al. 2011)<br />No detail of the differential between the 5 vitamin D’s or statement of fact that it is Vitamin D3 that a raw diet is high in. In fact high doses of vitamin D3 have been known to cure terminal cancer as well as many other diseases and boosts the immune system to 3-5 times normal strength. (Baggerly, 2009: Prendegast, 2009)<br />Risk of bone splintering (Case et al. 2011)<br />Majority of pets fed butchers scraps & chicken bones – chickens now only around 12-16 weeks old with pliable bones – risk of splintering much higher in cooked bones<br />Bacteria in food found in faeces (Case et al. 2011)<br />Bacteria has found on meat and in faeces, but no data on if the animal in question was infected – with a much stronger immune system infection is unlikely<br />Pet food vitamins & minerals found to be 20 times recommendations (toxic levels) (O’Driscoll, 2005)<br />
  5. 5. Pottenger’s Cats (1983)<br />Monumental Study of carnivore nutrition in which stray cats were studied for 10 yrs, the only difference being 1 group were fed raw, and 1 group fed cooked.<br />Raw diet produced:<br />optimal health<br />good bone structure and density<br />wide palates with plenty of space for teeth <br />shiny fur<br />no parasites or disease <br />reproductive ease<br />gentleness<br />Cooked diet produced: <br />heterogeneous reproduction<br />physical degeneration, increasing with each generation<br />vermin and parasites abounded<br />skin diseases and allergies increased from 5% to over 90%<br />bones became soft and pliable. <br />suffered from:<br />adverse personality changes<br />hypothyroidism<br />most of the degenerative diseases encountered in human medicine<br />They became totally sterile by the fourth generation. (Pottenger, 1983)<br />
  6. 6. Anatomy/Physiology<br />Carnivores lack the dentition (Goody, 1997) & sufficient amylase production (Stevens & Hume, 1995) to masticate & digest carbohydrates, also starches ferment in the short canine gut leading to ulcers & structural/functional damage to stratified squamous, cardiac & gastric epithelium (Stevens & Hume, 1995).<br />
  7. 7. Justification<br />The market share has transferred from tinned food to dried food by 71% between 2000 & 2009(PFMA, 2010)<br />The average veterinary visit cost has increased 410% between 2000 & 2009 (Bruce, 2001: Petwise, 2009)<br />“there are no objective data to support or refute” claims of the health benefits of raw feeding (Case et al. 2011)<br />Raw feeding reduces veterinary visits by 85% (O’Driscoll, 2005)<br />With 3% of the US & Australian population of pet owners having switched to raw feeding (Case et al. 2011)and the trend on the increase, a scientific study is long overdue.<br />
  8. 8. Methodology<br />A number of dogs in a same breed rescue were placed on a dried diet for 4 weeks, and then a raw diet for 4 weeks<br />The same number of dogs in the same rescue were placed on a raw diet for 4 weeks and then a dried diet for 4 weeks<br />Tests were performed weekly throughout the trial, after an initial baseline, including:<br />Body Condition Scoring (Purina, N.D.)<br />Coat Condition Scoring (Waltham, 1999)<br />Tooth Condition <br />Temperament Assessment<br />Plus weight, temperature, blood pressure & pulse were taken<br />N.B. Dried diet provided = market leader<br /> Raw diet provided made to BARF specifications<br /> (Billinghurst, 2001)<br />
  9. 9. Ethics & Risks<br />Ethics:<br />1) Should any dog have an adverse reaction to any of the diets, they are immediately to be taken off the trial and returned to their previous diet.<br />2) Change of diet – the dogs in question have been on both a dried and raw diet & changed over recently – Rescue manager quite happy to perform research with not only the rescue dogs, but her own dogs too.<br />Risks:<br />Risk of being bitten by subjects – always deal with dogs with rescue manager present<br />Allergic reaction to diet – immediately take animal off product and seek veterinary advice<br />Risk of not enough numbers of dogs subject to the trial – Rescue manager happy to place her own pets on the trial too, however that would include 2 breeds not 1.<br />
  10. 10. References<br />Baggerly, C. (2009) Vitamin D Deficiency - Treatment and Diagnosis [Health and Medicine] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 16940] (Internet) Available from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQ-qekFoi-o (accessed 20/09/2011)<br />Billinghurst, I. (2001) The BARF Diet. Warrigal Publishing, N.S.W. Australia<br />Bruce, K. (2001) Dog Owners Voice Concern Over High Vet Fees, K9 Online, K9 Media Solutions Ltd, Notts, from: http://www.pressbox.co.uk/detailed/International/Dog_Owners_Voice_Concern_Over_High_Vet_Fees_1064.html (accessed 07/04/2010)<br />Case, L. P., Hayek, M.G., Daristotle, L. & Raasch, M.F. (2011) Canine & Feline Nutrition, MosebyInc, Missouri p. 170<br />Goody, P.C. (1997) Dog Anatomy. J.A. Allen, London p. 16-19<br />Institute of Medicine (2010) Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D (Internet) Available from: http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-for-Calcium-and-Vitamin-D.aspx?referrer=google&gclid=CKnr6JPmq6sCFYUJtAodUhMy7g (accessed 20/09/2011)<br />Kelly, N. & Wills, J. (1996) Manual of Companion Animal Nutrition and Feeding, BSAVA, Gloucester p254<br />Marshall, K.A. (1999) Measuring Skin and Coat Condition in Healthy Dogs (Internet) Available from: http://www.bearscampnewfs.com/health/Waltham%20Center/Measuring%20Skin%20and%20Coat%20Condition%20in%20Healthy%20Dogs.pdf (accessed 22/09/2011)<br />Nutrient Requirement of Dogs (1963) Journal of Small Animal PracticeVol 4. Pt 5. p. 373-381 <br />O’Driscoll, C. (2005) Shock to the System, Abbeywood Publishing (Vaccines) Ltd, London<br />Petwise, (2009) Why Insure your Pet?, Petwise Health Insurance, from: http://www.petwise-insurance.co.uk/pages/whyinsure.asp (accessed 07/04/2010)<br />PFMA, 2010, Pet Food Manufacturers Association, London<br />Pottenger, F., 1983, Pottenger’s Cats – A Study in Nutrition, Price-Pottenger Foundation Inc, California<br />Prendegast, J. (2009) Vitamin D is better than ANY vaccine & increases the immune system by 3-5 times (Internet) Available from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdLNMEXWTL8 (accessed 20/09/2011)<br />Purina (N.D.) Understanding Your Dog’s Body Condition (Internet) Available from: http://www.purina.co.uk/Home/All+About+Dogs/Health+and+Wellbeing+Dog/Healthy+Living+Dog/Understanding+Your+Dogs+Body+Condition.htm (accessed 22/09/2011) <br />Stevens, C.E. & Hume, I.D. (1995) Comparative Physiology of the Vertebrate Digestive System. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge p. 183, 224-228<br />Turner, H. (2008) Photograph<br />

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