Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 1
Chapter 1:
Exploring the Network
Intro...
Presentation_ID 2© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Chapter 1: Objectives
Students will be...
Presentation_ID 3© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Chapter 1
1.1 Globally Connected
1.2 L...
Presentation_ID 4© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Networking Today
Networks in Our Past ...
Presentation_ID 5© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Networking Today
The Global Community
Presentation_ID 6© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Living in a Network-Centric World
Comm...
Presentation_ID 7© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Living in a Network-Centric World
Comm...
Presentation_ID 8© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Living in a Network-Centric World
Comm...
Presentation_ID 9© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Living in a Network-Centric World
Comm...
Presentation_ID 10© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Quality of Communications
Communicati...
Presentation_ID 11© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Quality of Communications
Communicati...
Presentation_ID 12© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Interconnecting our Lives
Networking ...
Presentation_ID 13© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Interconnecting our Lives
Networking ...
Presentation_ID 14© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Interconnecting our Lives
Networking ...
Presentation_ID 15© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Interconnecting our Lives
Networking ...
Presentation_ID 16© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Providing Resources in a Network
Netw...
Presentation_ID 17© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Providing Resources in a Network
Clie...
Presentation_ID 18© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Providing Resources in a Network
Peer...
Presentation_ID 19© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs, WANs, and Internets
Components ...
Presentation_ID 20© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Components of a Network
End Devices
S...
Presentation_ID 21© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Components of a Network
Network Infra...
Presentation_ID 22© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Components of a Network
Network Media
Presentation_ID 23© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Components of a Network
Network Repre...
Presentation_ID 24© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Components of a Network
Topology Diag...
Presentation_ID 25© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs, WANs, and Internets
Internet Ac...
Presentation_ID 26© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs and WANs
Types of Networks
The t...
Presentation_ID 27© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs and WANs
Local Area Networks (LA...
Presentation_ID 28© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs and WANs
Wide Area Networks (WAN)
Presentation_ID 29© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs, WANs, and Internets
The Internet
Presentation_ID 30© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
The Internet
Intranet and Extranet
Presentation_ID 31© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
The Internet
Intranet and Extranet
In...
Presentation_ID 32© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
LANs, WANs, and Internets
Popular Com...
Presentation_ID 33© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Connecting to the Internet
Connecting...
Presentation_ID 34© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Connecting to the Internet
Connecting...
Presentation_ID 35© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Converged Networks
The Converging Net...
Presentation_ID 36© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Converged Networks
The Converging Net...
Presentation_ID 37© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Converged Networks
Planning for the F...
Presentation_ID 38© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Supporting Network A...
Presentation_ID 39© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Fault Tolerance
 Th...
Presentation_ID 40© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Fault Tolerance in C...
Presentation_ID 41© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Packet-Switched Netw...
Presentation_ID 42© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalability
 A scal...
Presentation_ID 43© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalable Networks – ...
Presentation_ID 44© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalable Networks – ...
Presentation_ID 45© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalable Networks – ...
Presentation_ID 46© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalable Networks – ...
Presentation_ID 47© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalable Networks – ...
Presentation_ID 48© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Scalable Networks - ...
Presentation_ID 49© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing (QoS)
Presentation_ID 50© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing (QoS)
Exam...
Presentation_ID 51© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing (QoS)
Presentation_ID 52© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing (QoS)
Presentation_ID 53© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing Network Se...
Presentation_ID 54© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing Network Se...
Presentation_ID 55© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing Network Se...
Presentation_ID 56© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing Network Se...
Presentation_ID 57© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing Network Se...
Presentation_ID 58© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Reliable Network
Providing Network Se...
Presentation_ID 59© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
New trends
Information...
Presentation_ID 60© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
New trends
Presentation_ID 61© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
New trends
Some of the...
Presentation_ID 62© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
Bring Your Own Device ...
Presentation_ID 63© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
Online Collaboration
Presentation_ID 64© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
Video Communication
Presentation_ID 65© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
Cloud Computing
There ...
Presentation_ID 66© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Trends
Data Centers
A data ce...
Presentation_ID 67© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Networking Technologies for the Home
...
Presentation_ID 68© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Networking Technologies for the Home
...
Presentation_ID 69© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Networking Technologies for the Home
...
Presentation_ID 70© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Future of Networking
Network Security
Presentation_ID 71© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Security
Security Threats
The...
Presentation_ID 72© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Security
Security Solutions
N...
Presentation_ID 73© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Architectures
Cisco Network A...
Presentation_ID 74© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Network Architectures
Cisco Certified...
Presentation_ID 75© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
In t...
Presentation_ID 76© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
In t...
Presentation_ID 77© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
In t...
Presentation_ID 78© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 79© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 80© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 81© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 82© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 83© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 84© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 85© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Summary
Revi...
Presentation_ID 86© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Exploring the Networking
Lab: Skills ...
Presentation_ID 87© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Lab: Skills Integration: Use of TCP/I...
Presentation_ID 88© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Itn instructor ppt_chapter1 exploring the network smartskills

882 views

Published on

Chapter1 Exploring the Network

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Itn instructor ppt_chapter1 exploring the network smartskills

  1. 1. © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 1 Chapter 1: Exploring the Network Introduction to Networks
  2. 2. Presentation_ID 2© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Chapter 1: Objectives Students will be able to:  Explain how multiple networks are used in everyday life.  Explain the topologies and devices used in a small to medium-sized business network.  Explain the basic characteristics of a network that supports communication in a small to medium-sized business.  Explain trends in networking that will affect the use of networks in small to medium-sized businesses.
  3. 3. Presentation_ID 3© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Chapter 1 1.1 Globally Connected 1.2 LANs, WANs, and the Internet 1.3 The Network as a Platform 1.4 The Changing Network Environment 1.5 Summary and review Questions
  4. 4. Presentation_ID 4© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Networking Today Networks in Our Past and Daily Lives
  5. 5. Presentation_ID 5© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Networking Today The Global Community
  6. 6. Presentation_ID 6© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Living in a Network-Centric World Communication – An essential part of our lives  How do you define communication?
  7. 7. Presentation_ID 7© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Living in a Network-Centric World Communication – An essential part of our lives  Establishing the Rules
  8. 8. Presentation_ID 8© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Living in a Network-Centric World Communication – An essential part of our lives  Establishing the Rules
  9. 9. Presentation_ID 9© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Living in a Network-Centric World Communication – An essential part of our lives  Establishing the Rules
  10. 10. Presentation_ID 10© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Quality of Communications Communication – An essential part of our lives For data networks, we use the same basic criteria to judge success. As a message moves through the network, many factors can prevent the message from reaching the recipient or distort its intended meaning. These factors can be either external or internal.  External Factors 1. The quality of the pathway between the sender and the recipient 2. The number of times the message has to change form 3. The number of times the message has to be redirected or readressed 4. The number of other messages being transmitted simultaneously on the communication network 5. The amount of time allotted for successful communication
  11. 11. Presentation_ID 11© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Quality of Communications Communication – An essential part of our lives Different types of messages may vary in complexity and importance. Clear and concise messages are usually easier to understand than complex messages. Important communications require more care to ensure that they are delivered and understood by the recipient.  Internal Factors 1. The size of the message 2. The complexity of the message 3. The importance of the message Large messages may be interrupted or delayed at different points within the network. A message with a low importance or priority could be dropped if the network becomes overloaded.
  12. 12. Presentation_ID 12© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Interconnecting our Lives Networking impacts in our daily lives  Networks Support the Way We Learn
  13. 13. Presentation_ID 13© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Interconnecting our Lives Networking impacts in our daily lives  Networks Support the Way We Communicate
  14. 14. Presentation_ID 14© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Interconnecting our Lives Networking impacts in our daily lives  Networks Support the Way We Work
  15. 15. Presentation_ID 15© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Interconnecting our Lives Networking impacts in our daily lives  Networks Support the Way We Play
  16. 16. Presentation_ID 16© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Providing Resources in a Network Networks of Many Sizes
  17. 17. Presentation_ID 17© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Providing Resources in a Network Clients and Servers
  18. 18. Presentation_ID 18© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Providing Resources in a Network Peer-to-Peer
  19. 19. Presentation_ID 19© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs, WANs, and Internets Components of a Network There are three categories of network components:  Devices  Media  Services
  20. 20. Presentation_ID 20© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Components of a Network End Devices Some examples of end devices are:  Computers (work stations, laptops, file servers, web servers)  Network printers  VoIP phones  TelePresence endpoint  Security cameras  Mobile handheld devices (such as smartphones, tablets, PDAs, and wireless debit / credit card readers and barcode scanners)
  21. 21. Presentation_ID 21© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Components of a Network Network Infrastructure Devices Examples of intermediary network devices are:  Network Access Devices (switches, and wireless access points)  Internetworking Devices (routers)  Security Devices (firewalls)
  22. 22. Presentation_ID 22© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Components of a Network Network Media
  23. 23. Presentation_ID 23© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Components of a Network Network Representations
  24. 24. Presentation_ID 24© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Components of a Network Topology Diagrams
  25. 25. Presentation_ID 25© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs, WANs, and Internets Internet Access Technologies
  26. 26. Presentation_ID 26© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs and WANs Types of Networks The two most common types of network infrastructures are:  Local Area Network (LAN)  Wide Area Network (WAN). Other types of networks include:  Metropolitan Area Network (MAN)  Wireless LAN (WLAN)  Storage Area Network (SAN)
  27. 27. Presentation_ID 27© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs and WANs Local Area Networks (LAN)
  28. 28. Presentation_ID 28© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs and WANs Wide Area Networks (WAN)
  29. 29. Presentation_ID 29© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs, WANs, and Internets The Internet
  30. 30. Presentation_ID 30© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential The Internet Intranet and Extranet
  31. 31. Presentation_ID 31© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential The Internet Intranet and Extranet Intranets, private networks in use by just one company, enable businesses to communicate and perform transactions among global employee and branch locations. Companies develop extranets, or extended internetworks, to provide suppliers, vendors, and customers limited access to corporate data to check order status, inventory, and parts lists.
  32. 32. Presentation_ID 32© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential LANs, WANs, and Internets Popular Communication Tools The existence and broad adoption of the Internet has ushered in new forms of communication that empower individuals to create information that can be accessed by a global audience.  Instant Messaging  Weblogs (blogs)  Wikis  Podcasting  Collaboration Tools
  33. 33. Presentation_ID 33© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Connecting to the Internet Connecting Remote Users to the Internet
  34. 34. Presentation_ID 34© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Connecting to the Internet Connecting Businesses to the Internet
  35. 35. Presentation_ID 35© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Converged Networks The Converging Network
  36. 36. Presentation_ID 36© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Converged Networks The Converging Network
  37. 37. Presentation_ID 37© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Converged Networks Planning for the Future
  38. 38. Presentation_ID 38© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Supporting Network Architecture As networks evolve, we are discovering that there are four basic characteristics that the underlying architectures need to address in order to meet user expectations:  Fault Tolerance  Scalability  Quality of Service (QoS)  Security
  39. 39. Presentation_ID 39© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Fault Tolerance  The expectation that the Internet is always available to the millions of users who rely on it requires a network architecture that is designed and built to be fault tolerant. A fault tolerant network is one that limits the impact of a hardware or software failure and can recover quickly when such a failure occurs.
  40. 40. Presentation_ID 40© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Fault Tolerance in Circuit Switched Network
  41. 41. Presentation_ID 41© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Packet-Switched Networks
  42. 42. Presentation_ID 42© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalability  A scalable network can expand quickly to support new users and applications without impacting the performance of the service being delivered to existing users. The ability of the network to support these new interconnections depends on a hierarchical layered design for the underlying physical infrastructure and logical architecture.
  43. 43. Presentation_ID 43© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalable Networks – Tier 1
  44. 44. Presentation_ID 44© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalable Networks – Tier 2
  45. 45. Presentation_ID 45© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalable Networks – Tier 3
  46. 46. Presentation_ID 46© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalable Networks – Hierarchical
  47. 47. Presentation_ID 47© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalable Networks – Distributed
  48. 48. Presentation_ID 48© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Scalable Networks - Peers
  49. 49. Presentation_ID 49© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing (QoS)
  50. 50. Presentation_ID 50© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing (QoS) Examples of priority decisions for an organization might include:  Time-sensitive communication - increase priority for services like telephony or video distribution.  Non time-sensitive communication - decrease priority for web page retrieval or email.  High importance to organization - increase priority for production control or business transaction data.  Undesirable communication - decrease priority or block unwanted activity, like peer-to-peer file sharing or live entertainment
  51. 51. Presentation_ID 51© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing (QoS)
  52. 52. Presentation_ID 52© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing (QoS)
  53. 53. Presentation_ID 53© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing Network Security
  54. 54. Presentation_ID 54© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing Network Security Security measures taken in a network should:  Prevent unauthorized disclosure or theft of information  Prevent unauthorized modification of information  Prevent Denial of Service Means to achieve these goals include:  Ensuring confidentiality  Maintaining communication integrity  Ensuring availability
  55. 55. Presentation_ID 55© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing Network Security  Ensuring Confidentiality Data privacy is maintained by allowing only the intended and authorized recipients - individuals, processes, or devices - to read the data. Having a strong system for user authentication, enforcing passwords that are difficult to guess, and requiring users to change them frequently helps restrict access to communications and to data stored on network attached devices. Where appropriate, encrypting content ensures confidentiality and minimizes unauthorized disclosure or theft of information.
  56. 56. Presentation_ID 56© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing Network Security  Maintaining Communication Integrity Data integrity means having the assurance that the information has not been altered in transmission, from origin to destination. Data integrity can be compromised when information has been corrupted - willfully or accidentally - before the intended recipient receives it. Source integrity is the assurance that the identity of the sender has been validated. Source integrity is compromised when a user or device fakes its identity and supplies incorrect information to a recipient. The use of digital signatures, hashing algorithms and check sum mechanisms are ways to provide source and data integrity across a network to prevent unauthorized modification of information.
  57. 57. Presentation_ID 57© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing Network Security  Ensuring Availability Ensuring confidentiality and integrity are irrelevant if network resources become over burdened, or not available at all. Availability means having the assurance of timely and reliable access to data services for authorized users. Resources can be unavailable during a Denial of Service (DoS) attack or due to the spread of a computer virus. Network firewall devices, along with desktop and server anti-virus software can ensure system reliability and the robustness to detect, repel, and cope with such attacks. Building fully redundant network infrastructures, with few single points of failure, can reduce the impact of these threats.
  58. 58. Presentation_ID 58© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Reliable Network Providing Network Security
  59. 59. Presentation_ID 59© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends New trends Information Technology and networking careers are growing and evolving as fast as the underlying technologies and services. As networks increase in sophistication, the demand for people with networking skills will continue to grow. Traditional IT positions like programmers, software engineers, data base administrators and network technicians are now joined by new titles, such as network architect, e-Commerce site designer, information security officer, and home integration specialist. As students of networking technology, we examine the components of data networks and the roles they play in enabling communication. This course,is designed to empower you with the networking knowledge to build and manage these evolving networks.
  60. 60. Presentation_ID 60© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends New trends
  61. 61. Presentation_ID 61© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends New trends Some of the top trends include:  Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)  Online collaboration  Video  Cloud computing
  62. 62. Presentation_ID 62© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)
  63. 63. Presentation_ID 63© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends Online Collaboration
  64. 64. Presentation_ID 64© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends Video Communication
  65. 65. Presentation_ID 65© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends Cloud Computing There are four primary types of clouds:  Public clouds  Private clouds  Custom clouds  Hybrid clouds
  66. 66. Presentation_ID 66© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Trends Data Centers A data center is a facility used to house computer systems and associated components including:  Redundant data communications connections  High-speed virtual servers (sometimes referred to as server farms or server clusters)  Redundant storage systems (typically uses SAN technology)  Redundant or backup power supplies  Environmental controls (e.g., air conditioning, fire suppression)  Security devices
  67. 67. Presentation_ID 67© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Networking Technologies for the Home Technology Trends in the Home
  68. 68. Presentation_ID 68© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Networking Technologies for the Home Powerline Networking
  69. 69. Presentation_ID 69© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Networking Technologies for the Home Wireless Broadband
  70. 70. Presentation_ID 70© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Future of Networking Network Security
  71. 71. Presentation_ID 71© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Security Security Threats The most common external threats to networks include:  Viruses, worms, and Trojan horses  Spyware and adware  Zero-day attacks, also called zero-hour attacks  Hacker attacks  Denial of service attacks  Data interception and theft  Identity theft
  72. 72. Presentation_ID 72© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Security Security Solutions Network security components often include:  Antivirus and antispyware  Firewall filtering  Dedicated firewall systems  Access control lists (ACL)  Intrusion prevention systems (IPS)  Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)
  73. 73. Presentation_ID 73© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Architectures Cisco Network Architectures
  74. 74. Presentation_ID 74© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Network Architectures Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)
  75. 75. Presentation_ID 75© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary In this chapter, you learned:  Networks and the Internet have changed the way we communicate, learn, work, and even play.  Networks come in all sizes. They can range from simple networks consisting of two computers, to networks connecting millions of devices.  The Internet is the largest network in existence. In fact, the term Internet means a ‘network of networks. The Internet provides the services that enable us to connect and communicate with our families, friends, work, and interests.
  76. 76. Presentation_ID 76© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary In this chapter, you learned:  The network infrastructure is the platform that supports the network. It provides the stable and reliable channel over which communication can occur. It is made up of network components including end devices, intermediate device, and network media.  Networks must be reliable.  Network security is an integral part of computer networking, regardless of whether the network is limited to a home environment with a single connection to the Internet, or as large as a corporation with thousands of users.
  77. 77. Presentation_ID 77© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary In this chapter, you learned:  The network infrastructure can vary greatly in terms of size, number of users, and number and types of services that are supported on it. The network infrastructure must grow and adjust to support the way the network is used. The routing and switching platform is the foundation of any network infrastructure.
  78. 78. Presentation_ID 78© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  Describe the external factors that impact network communication. External factors affecting the quality of communication are related to the processes that devices use to talk to each other and include: • Whether a confirmation of the message was returned to the sender. • The quality of the pathway between the sender and the recipient. • The number of times the message has to change form. • The number of other messages in the communication network. • The number of times the message is reformatted. • The amount of time allotted for successful communication.
  79. 79. Presentation_ID 79© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  Describe the Internal factors that impact network communication. Internal factors that interfere with communication are related to the nature of the communication itself. The communication may vary in complexity and importance. Clear and concise messages are usually easier to understand than complex messages. Important communications require more care to ensure that the meaning is received properly. Internal factors affecting the quality of communication include: • The size of the message • The complexity of the message • The importance of the message
  80. 80. Presentation_ID 80© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  Describe network-supported technologies that impact how people learn, work, and play. Includes instant messaging, weblogs, podcasting, collaboration tools using text, graphic, audio and video technologies over both fixed and mobile data networks.
  81. 81. Presentation_ID 81© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  What is data? What is a data network? What is a converged network? Data is the pieces of information, such as files, audio, phone calls and video shared across the network. A data network consists of: • Devices that communicate with each other • A means of connecting these devices together – a medium that can transport messages from one device to another • The digital messages or units of information that will travel from one device to another • Rules of agreements to govern how the messages are sent, directed, and received.
  82. 82. Presentation_ID 82© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  What is a converged network? Traditionally telephone, data communications between computers, radio, and television each had separate networks and each required a different technology to carry its particular communication signal. Additionally, each service had its own set of rules and standards to ensure the successful communication of its service across a specific medium. Technology can now consolidate these disparate networks into one platform – a platform we define as the converged network. The flow of voice, radio, video, and data travelling over the same network eliminates the need to create and maintain separate networks. As converged networks become more common, businesses and individual users can use a single network for its services.
  83. 83. Presentation_ID 83© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  Why does Quality of Service matter on a data network? Converged networks carry multiple types of communication. Data network resources, however are always constrained by budgets, physical limitations, and technology. The existence of these limitations means that decisions must be made regarding the priority of different types of communication. The management of different types of communication involves balancing both the traffic´s importance and its characteristics. Both of these factors are considered when developing a Quality of Service (QoS) strategy for managing data in a given data network.
  84. 84. Presentation_ID 84© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  What happens without a properly designed and implemented QoS mechanism? Without properly designed and implemented QoS mechanisms, data packets will be dropped without consideration of the application characteristics or priority.
  85. 85. Presentation_ID 85© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Summary Review  What does security mean in the context of data networks? Data network security has two aspects: • Interception of data communications – data encryption can negate such interceptions. • Unauthorized access to the network and its data – User authentication (usernames, passwords and classifications are tools to prevent this - In addition to physical security) Intruders may desire to gain access to information for monetary gain. They steal financial records or sell trade secrets to competitors. For others stealing data is merely a game about which they can brag, often boast about it their latest online conquests. Many have limited computer and network skills and do this just for fun. Some change, destroy or just disrupt. Some are disgruntled employees to wreak havoc.
  86. 86. Presentation_ID 86© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Exploring the Networking Lab: Skills Integration Challenge: Introduction to PT
  87. 87. Presentation_ID 87© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential Lab: Skills Integration: Use of TCP/IP in PT demo Exploring the Networking
  88. 88. Presentation_ID 88© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential

×