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Toastmasters International Trains People in Speaking and Leadership

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Thomas Spetter joined the sales team at Pitney Bowes after he earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington in 1991. He moved to Xerox in 1993 and joined the pharmaceutical industry in 1994, representing Abbott Laboratories. He currently serves as key account manager at Turing Pharmaceuticals, a post he has held since the summer of 2015. Thomas “Tom” Spetter has belonged to several professional and civic organizations through the years, including the Orange County Junior Chamber of Commerce, the San Diego Medical Service Society, and Toastmasters International.

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Toastmasters International Trains People in Speaking and Leadership

  1. 1. By Thomas Spetter Toastmasters International Trains People in Speaking and Leadership
  2. 2. Introduction  Thomas Spetter joined the sales team at Pitney Bowes after he earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington in 1991. He moved to Xerox in 1993 and joined the pharmaceutical industry in 1994, representing Abbott Laboratories. He currently serves as key account manager at Turing Pharmaceuticals, a post he has held since the summer of 2015. Thomas “Tom” Spetter has belonged to several professional and civic organizations through the years, including the Orange County Junior Chamber of Commerce, the San Diego Medical Service Society, and Toastmasters International. Ralph Smedley, who worked for the YMCA, identified a need within the community he served for men who could speak publicly, conduct meetings, work on committees, and plan programs. In 1924, he formally established Toastmasters to meet these needs.
  3. 3. Toastmasters International  Like the practice at modern Toastmasters’ meetings, members alternated leading the meetings and giving short speeches, which were evaluated by the more experienced participants. The concept quickly gained in popularity. Today, more than 335,000 members meet in more than 15,400 clubs in 135 countries worldwide, developing crucial speaking, listening, and organizational skills necessary to lead businesses, sports teams and even families. Toastmasters identifies five common myths about public speaking: 1. “Good speakers are born, not made.” The fact is, with training and practice, anybody can become an effective public speaker. Anyone. 2. “Good speakers don’t get nervous.” The destructive corollary is that if you’re nervous, you’re not good. In response, Toastmasters quotes Mark Twain: “There are two types of speakers in the world: 1) the nervous, and 2) liars.”
  4. 4. Conclusion  3. “Introverts cannot be good public speakers.” Toastmasters and others have shown time and again that introverts can make excellent public speakers. 4. “You must memorize a speech.” Although some good speakers do memorize their speeches, many don’t. Instead, they learn their key points by heart and practice a great deal. Famous performance coach Tony Robbins insists that memorization only hurts a presentation. 5. “There’s a rigid code of conduct for speeches.” Good public speakers don’t adhere to lists of rules, they simply talk to their audiences in a

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