Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action

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The Child Protection Working Group (CPWG) is the global level forum for coordination and collaboration on child protection in humanitarian settings. The group brings together NGOs, UN agencies, academics and other partners under the shared objective of ensuring more predictable, accountable and effective child protection responses in emergencies. - See more at: http://cpwg.net/cpwg/#sthash.wTqjET4D.dpuf
In 2010 the members of the global CPWG agreed on the need for child protection standards in humanitarian settings. The Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action were developed between January 2011 and September 2012. The process of drafting the Minimum Standards involved over 400 individuals from 30 agencies in over 40 countries, including child protection practitioners, humanitarian actors from other sectors, academics and policy makers. - See more at: http://cpwg.net/minimum-standards/#sthash.01h1va2Z.dpuf

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Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action

  1. 1. The Child Protection Working Group (CPWG) is the global level forum for coordination on child protection in humanitarian settings. The group brings together NGOs, UN agencies, academics and others under the shared objective of ensuring more predictable, accountable and effective child protection responses in emergencies. In the humanitarian system, the CPWG constitutes an “area of responsibility” within the Global Protection Cluster. http://www.cpwg.net
  2. 2. Acknowledgements ChildFund Child Soldiers International Columbia University Danish Refugee Council Geneva Call Handicap International ICRC International Rescue Committee Islamic Relief Worldwide International Labour Organization Keeping Children Safe Norwegian Refugee Council Plan International Save the Children SOS Children’s Villages Terre des Hommes UNDPKO UNHCR UNICEF War Child Women's Refugee Commission World Vision International Funded by: Designed by: Suggested citation: http://www.cpwg.net 3
  3. 3. Foreword Louise Aubin Rashid Khalikov OCHA UNHCR 5
  4. 4. Table of ContentS 13 14 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 29 30 31
  5. 5. 37 44 50 56 62 69 79 85 91 97 103 111 117 128 135 143 149 155
  6. 6. 167 173 180 186 193 198 203 208
  7. 7. INTRODUCTION
  8. 8. What is child protection in emergencies? 13
  9. 9. The international legal basis for child protection in emergencies 1. 2. 3. 14
  10. 10. Four key principles set out by the CRC, and their relevance to humanitarian action: 15
  11. 11. How does child protection fit within humanitarian action? 16
  12. 12. What is the purpose of these standards? How do these standards link with the Sphere Project and other standards? 17
  13. 13. What does each standard contain? 18
  14. 14. Who are the standards intended for? 19
  15. 15. How were the standards developed and what are they based on? 20
  16. 16. What is meant by “minimum” standards, and what happens if they cannot be met? 21
  17. 17. How do I use the standards in my context? 22
  18. 18. At what stage of humanitarian action do the standards apply? 23
  19. 19. PRINCIPLES AND APPROACHES PRINCIPLES AND APPROACHES
  20. 20. Principles and approaches The considerations in this section are key to the full application and attainment of the standards, and should be used and presented alongside the standards. Principles 1- 4 are the Protection Principles in the Sphere child protection.
  21. 21. Principle 1: Avoid exposing people to further harm as a result of your actions 27
  22. 22. Principle 2: Ensure people’s access to impartial assistance 28
  23. 23. Principle 3: Protect people from physical and psychological harm arising from violence and coercion Principle 4: Assist people to claim their rights, access available remedies and recover from the effects of abuse 29
  24. 24. Principle 5: Strengthen child protection systems 30
  25. 25. Principle 6: Strengthen children’s resilience in humanitarian action 31
  26. 26. 32
  27. 27. STANDARDS
  28. 28. Ensure a quality response STANDARDS TO ENSURE A QUALITY CHILD PROTECTION RESPONSE
  29. 29. standards to ensure a quality child protection response These standards focus on key programming components, including: They do not aim to replace the existing policies and The standards that follow in the next section are related
  30. 30. standard 1 STANDARD 1 COORDINATION Standard Key actions 37
  31. 31. 38 standard 1
  32. 32. standard 1 39
  33. 33. standard 1 MeasuremenT 40
  34. 34. standard 1 Guidance notes 1. Responsibility for coordination: 3. Provider of last resort: 41
  35. 35. standard 1 5. Sensitive issues: 7. Global-level CPWG: 42
  36. 36. standard 1 References 43
  37. 37. standard 2 STANDARD 2 Human resources Standard Key actions 44
  38. 38. standard 2 45
  39. 39. standard 2 MeasuremenT Guidance notes 3. Staff capacity: 46
  40. 40. standard 2 4. Gender: 5. Disability: 47
  41. 41. standard 2 7. Capacity building: 9. Child protection policy: 10. Staff wellbeing: 48
  42. 42. standard 2 References 49
  43. 43. standard 3 STANDARD 3 Communication, advocacy and media Standard Key actions 50
  44. 44. standard 3 51
  45. 45. standard 3 MeasuremenT 52
  46. 46. standard 3 Guidance notes 1. Organizational guidance: 2. Building national capacity for advocacy: 4. Participation: 53
  47. 47. 54 standard 3
  48. 48. standard 3 References 55
  49. 49. standard 4 STANDARD 4 Programme cycle management UNDERSTAND learn plan and implement Standard Key actions 56 know analyse
  50. 50. standard 4 57
  51. 51. standard 4 MeasuremenT 7. 8. Guidance notes 2. Coordination structure: 58
  52. 52. standard 4 5. Data disaggregation: 6. Inclusion: 59
  53. 53. standard 4 8. Life with dignity: 10. Ensuring the views of affected people, including children: 60
  54. 54. References standard 4 61
  55. 55. standard 5 STANDARD 5 Information management (1) (2) (3) Standard Key actions 62
  56. 56. standard 5 63
  57. 57. standard 5 MeasuremenT Guidance notes 1. Coordination: 64
  58. 58. standard 5 3. Security precautions: 65
  59. 59. standard 5 6. Mandatory Reporting: 66
  60. 60. standard 5 67
  61. 61. standard 5 References 68
  62. 62. STANDARD 6 Child protection monitoring standard 6 Standard Key actions 69
  63. 63. 70 standard 6
  64. 64. MeasuremenT standard 6 Guidance notes 1. Mapping: 71
  65. 65. standard 6 3. Coordination: 4. Training: 72
  66. 66. standard 6 73
  67. 67. 74 standard 6
  68. 68. References standard 6 75
  69. 69. Address needs STANDARDS TO address child protection needs
  70. 70. standards to address child protection needs areas of work and critical issues in child protection: groups
  71. 71. STANDARD 7 Dangers and injuries standard 7 Standard Key actions 79
  72. 72. 80 standard 7
  73. 73. MeasuremenT standard 7 Guidance notes 1. Physical dangers and risks: 2. Data collection: 81
  74. 74. 82 standard 7
  75. 75. 5. Schools: standard 7 7. Survivor assistance: 83
  76. 76. standard 7 References 84
  77. 77. STANDARD 8 Physical violence and other harmful practices standard 8 Standard Key actions 85
  78. 78. 86 standard 8
  79. 79. MeasuremenT standard 8 Guidance notes 87
  80. 80. standard 8 4. Awareness: 6. Interviews: 88
  81. 81. 7. Gender: standard 8 89
  82. 82. standard 8 References 90
  83. 83. STANDARD 9 Sexual violence standard 9 Standard Key actions 91
  84. 84. 92 standard 9
  85. 85. standard 9 MeasuremenT 93
  86. 86. Guidance notes standard 9 1. Awareness: 2. Capacity building: 4. Code of conduct: 94
  87. 87. standard 9 8. Interviews: 9. Adolescents: 10. Children and adolescents with disabilities: 95
  88. 88. standard 9 References 96
  89. 89. STANDARD 10 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders standard 10 Standard Key actions 97
  90. 90. standard 10 MeasuremenT 98
  91. 91. Guidance notes 1. Multi-layered supports: standard 10 intervention pyramid Examples 99
  92. 92. standard 10 4. Early childhood: 100
  93. 93. 7. Support to caregivers: standard 10 8. Monitoring wellbeing: 101
  94. 94. standard 10 References 102
  95. 95. STANDARD 11 Children associated with armed forces or armed groups standard 11 Standard Key actions 103
  96. 96. 104 standard 11
  97. 97. MeasuremenT standard 11 Guidance notes 1. Advocacy: 105
  98. 98. standard 11 4. Release: 106
  99. 99. standard 11 107
  100. 100. standard 11 8. Reintegration: 108
  101. 101. standard 11 109
  102. 102. standard 11 References 110
  103. 103. STANDARD 12 Child labour standard 12 To be eliminated activities not to necessarily be eliminated To be eliminated as a mater of urgency 111
  104. 104. Standard standard 12 Key actions 112
  105. 105. MeasuremenT standard 12 Guidance notes 113
  106. 106. standard 12 2. Hazardous work: 3. Children who need targeted help: 114
  107. 107. 5. Support provided to children: standard 12 115
  108. 108. standard 12 References 116
  109. 109. STANDARD 13 Unaccompanied and separated children standard 13 Standard 117
  110. 110. standard 13 A. Key actions - identification, documentation, tracing and reunification (IDTR) 118
  111. 111. standard 13 119
  112. 112. standard 13 B. Key actions - alternative care 120
  113. 113. MeasuremenT standard 13 121
  114. 114. Guidance notes standard 13 1. First days: 3. Coordination: 122
  115. 115. standard 13 123
  116. 116. standard 13 7. Tracing: 124
  117. 117. 10. Follow-up: standard 13 125
  118. 118. 126 standard 13
  119. 119. References standard 13 127
  120. 120. standard 14 STANDARD 14 Justice for children 128
  121. 121. Standard Key actions standard 14 129
  122. 122. MeasuremenT standard 14 Guidance notes 1. Deprivation of liberty: 130
  123. 123. standard 14 3. Advocacy: 131
  124. 124. standard 14 References 132
  125. 125. Develop strategies STANDARDS TO develop adequatE child protection strategies
  126. 126. standards to develop adequate child protection strategies Standards in this area include the main child protection needs. As with all other standards, they are based on include standards relating to:
  127. 127. STANDARD 15 Case management standard 15 Standard 135
  128. 128. standard 15 Key actions 136
  129. 129. 0. 1. 4. 2. 3. standard 15 1. 2. 3. 4. 137
  130. 130. MeasuremenT 7. 8. standard 15 9. Guidance notes 2. Analysing what is possible: 138
  131. 131. standard 15 4. Standard operation procedures (SOPs): 6. Staff capacity: 139
  132. 132. standard 15 7. Prioritising cases: 9. Case plans: 140
  133. 133. 10. Case conferences: standard 15 12. Closing a case: 141
  134. 134. standard 15 References 142
  135. 135. STANDARD 16 Community-based mechanisms standard 16 Standard Key actions 143
  136. 136. 144 standard 16
  137. 137. MeasuremenT Guidance notes 1. External aid: standard 16 2. Ownership: 145
  138. 138. 5. Capacity Building: standard 16 6. Subgroups: 7. Messages: 146
  139. 139. 9. Urban settings: 10. Funding: standard 16 147
  140. 140. standard 16 References 148
  141. 141. STANDARD 17 Child-friendly spaces standard 17 Standard Key actions 149
  142. 142. 150 standard 17
  143. 143. MeasuremenT Guidance notes standard 17 1. Appropriateness: 151
  144. 144. 3. Age and gender sensitivity: standard 17 4. Disability awareness: 5. Play: 6. Schools: 152
  145. 145. 7. Parents: 8. Capacity building: 9. Monitoring: standard 17 153
  146. 146. standard 17 References 154
  147. 147. STANDARD 18 Protecting excluded children Standard standard 18 Key actions 155
  148. 148. 156 standard 18
  149. 149. MeasuremenT standard 18 Guidance notes 157
  150. 150. standard 18 2. Identifying excluded children: 4. Children with disabilities (CwD): 158
  151. 151. 6. Children living and working on the streets (CLWS): standard 18 7. Children affected by HIV: 159
  152. 152. 160 standard 18
  153. 153. References standard 18 161
  154. 154. Standards to mainstream child protection in other humanitarian sectors Mainstream child protection
  155. 155. Standards to mainstream child protection in other humanitarian sectors Why should child protection be mainstreamed? Many threats to the safety and wellbeing of children can be of humanitarian aid in all other sectors. Furthermore, all sectors the immediate humanitarian response, all humanitarian sectors ‘Mainstreaming’ child protection, or ensuring that child protection considerations inform all aspects of humanitarian action, helps to maximise the child protection impacts of exacerbated by programmes designed without proper mainstreaming child protection is part of compliance with the ‘do no harm’ principle. What do these standards cover? assistance and child protection (for example, where support to parents is likely to mean that children are safer) as actions for other humanitarians, to ensure child protection
  156. 156. progress towards reaching the standards children. Who is responsible for ensuring children are protected? States are responsible for protecting children at all times, including in humanitarian crises. All humanitarian workers are responsible for ensuring that their actions do not bring children into risk in any way, and that the programmes they implement One important aspect of this is simply ensuring that all children as they are to adults. safety and wellbeing of those affected, including children. For a powerful effect in keeping children and parents together. role in water collection, as well as their other duties and needs, is thought through carefully from the start. These Standards focus mainstreaming child protection in the following sectors:
  157. 157. STANDARD 19 Economic recovery and child protection standard 19 Standard Key actions 167
  158. 158. 168 standard 19
  159. 159. MeasuremenT standard 19 169
  160. 160. Guidance notes standard 19 1. Structural barriers: 4. Cash transfers: 170
  161. 161. 5. Monitoring and evaluation: standard 19 8. Stereotyping: 171
  162. 162. standard 19 References 172
  163. 163. STANDARD 20 Education and child protection Standard standard 20 Key actions 173
  164. 164. 174 standard 20
  165. 165. standard 20 175
  166. 166. MeasuremenT standard 20 Guidance notes 1. Flexibility, relevance and quality: 176
  167. 167. 3. Equity: 4. Teachers and other education personnel: standard 20 6. Abuse: 177
  168. 168. 7. Attacks: standard 20 8. Messaging: 178
  169. 169. References standard 20 179
  170. 170. STANDARD 21 Health and child protection Standard standard 21 Key actions 180
  171. 171. standard 21 181
  172. 172. 182 standard 21
  173. 173. MeasuremenT Guidance notes standard 21 183
  174. 174. 2. Medical reports: standard 21 3. Capacity building: 5. Evacuation: 184
  175. 175. References standard 21 185
  176. 176. STANDARD 22 Nutrition and child protection Standard standard 22 Key actions 186
  177. 177. standard 22 187
  178. 178. standard 22 MeasuremenT 188
  179. 179. Guidance notes 1. Capacity building: standard 22 189
  180. 180. 3. Infant feeding: standard 22 4. Mother groups: 190
  181. 181. 7. Social workers: standard 22 191
  182. 182. standard 22 References 192
  183. 183. STANDARD 23 Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and child protection Standard Key actions standard 23 193
  184. 184. 194 standard 23
  185. 185. MeasuremenT Guidance notes 1. Capacity building: 2. Messaging: standard 23 195
  186. 186. 3. Water containers: standard 23 4. Age groups: 196
  187. 187. References standard 23 197
  188. 188. STANDARD 24 Shelter and child protection Standard standard 24 Key actions 198
  189. 189. standard 24 199
  190. 190. MeasuremenT standard 24 Guidance notes 200
  191. 191. 3. Multi-disciplinary: 4. Capacity building: standard 24 201
  192. 192. standard 24 References 202
  193. 193. STANDARD 25 Camp management and child protection Standard Key actions standard 25 203
  194. 194. 204 standard 25
  195. 195. MeasuremenT Guidance notes standard 25 2. Focal points: 205
  196. 196. 4. Equal access: 5. Site planning: standard 25 6. Safety: 206
  197. 197. References standard 25 207
  198. 198. STANDARD 26 Distribution and child protection Standard standard 26 Key actions 208
  199. 199. standard 26 209
  200. 200. standard 26 MeasuremenT 210
  201. 201. Guidance notes 2. Monitoring: 3. Distribution: 4. Registration points: standard 26 211
  202. 202. 5. Separated children: standard 26 6. Targeted assistance: 212
  203. 203. References standard 26 213
  204. 204. Annexes and glossary ANNEXES AND GLOSSARY
  205. 205. ANNEXES Relevant legal instruments Global Regional Global 217
  206. 206. Regional 218
  207. 207. 219
  208. 208. GLOSSARY A Actors Accountability Age Children Adolescents Alternative care 221
  209. 209. I. II. III. IV. V. 222
  210. 210. C Capacity-building Child-friendly spaces (CFS) Child labour Cognitive 223
  211. 211. Coping Crisis D Desk review Dignity Disability Disaggregated data 224
  212. 212. Disaster Disaster preparedness Disaster risk reduction Duty bearers E Early recovery 225
  213. 213. G Gender H Hazard Hazardous work 226
  214. 214. I Internally displaced persons 227
  215. 215. International refugee law L Learners Life skills Livelihood 228
  216. 216. M Mitigation N P Participation Preparedness Prevention 229
  217. 217. Protection Psychosocial support Q Quality Qualitative and quantitative data R Resilience Risk 230
  218. 218. S Safety Security Sex Stakeholder Sustainable 231
  219. 219. V Vulnerability w Wellbeing 232
  220. 220. Acronyms and abbreviations AoR AXO BID CAAC CAAFAG CBCPM CBO CCM CFS CLMS CLWS CP CPiE CPIMS CPRA CPWG CRC CRPD CwD DDR DRR ECD ECOSOC ERW FTR GBV GBVIMS IA CP IMS IASC IAWG IAWG-UASC ICCPR ICRC IDP IDTR IMTF INEE INGO IOM IRC MARA 233
  221. 221. MBT MHPSS MoU MRM NFIs NGO NRCS OCHA OHCHR PFA PSS SeeP SOPs SRSG ToRs UASC UDHR UN UNAIDS UNFPA UNCHR UNICEF UNICEF CCC UXO WASH WCFL WWNK WWWW or 4W 234
  222. 222. INDEX 221 221 221 221 235
  223. 223. 221 224 222 236
  224. 224. 223 237
  225. 225. CERF 223 238
  226. 226. 221 239
  227. 227. 223 223–24 240
  228. 228. 230 224 224 241
  229. 229. 224 225 225 225 227 225 225–226 225 242
  230. 230. 226 243
  231. 231. 226 226 226 244
  232. 232. 222 245
  233. 233. 222 246
  234. 234. 227 227 228 228 228 228 228 228–229 247
  235. 235. 248
  236. 236. 249
  237. 237. 229 229 250
  238. 238. 230 230 251
  239. 239. 230 222 252
  240. 240. 230 230 231 231 253
  241. 241. 231 221 254
  242. 242. 231 255
  243. 243. 232 256
  244. 244. 232 257
  245. 245. Standards to ensure a quality child protection response Standards to aDdress child protection needs Standard 15 Standards to develop adequate child protection strategies Standard 18 Standard 17 Standard 16 Standard 7 Standard 12 Standard 11 Standard 10 Standard 9 Standard 8 Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 6 Standard 13 Standard 14 Standards to mainstream child protection IN OTHER HUMANITARIAN SECTORS Standard 19 Standard 20 Standard 21 Standard 22 Standard 23 Standard 24 Standard 25 Standard 26 The CPMS are recognised as a companion standard to The Sphere Project’s Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response

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