Hamlet on The HolodeckJanet H. Murray, 1997Parts I & II<br />Thembi Ford<br />IML 501<br />
Part I: A New Medium For Storytelling<br />“All the representational arts can be considered dangerously delusional, and th...
Lord Burleigh’s Kiss<br />Holodeck: An elaborate virtual reality simulation room from 1987’s Star Trek: The Next Generatio...
Harbingers of The Holodeck<br />A “multiform story” presents a single situation or plotline in multiple versions that woul...
From Additive To Expressive Form<br />The Four Essential Properties of Digital Environments<br />Procedural: ELIZA’s rules...
Part II: The Aesthetics of the Medium<br />“Perhaps the next Shakespeare of this world will be a great live-action role-pl...
Immersion<br />Surrendering mind to fictional world = “the willing suspension of disbelief.” But immersion = “the creation...
Regulating Immersion<br />“Little by little we are discovering the conventions of participation that will constitute the f...
Agency<br />We need the satisfaction of our actions and decisions having results; this is limited in traditional art but c...
Constructivism<br />“As computer access spreads, it is likely that more and more people will turn from win/lose game playi...
Transformation<br />Interactive, rotating “kaleidoscope” narratives; a shape-shifting world.<br />Collaborative creative e...
Notes & Changes<br />Murray sees most existing games as violent/simplistic/based on skill contests. This is a 1997 view (N...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Hamlet on The Holodeck Presentation

2,320 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,320
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
17
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hamlet on The Holodeck Presentation

  1. 1. Hamlet on The HolodeckJanet H. Murray, 1997Parts I & II<br />Thembi Ford<br />IML 501<br />
  2. 2. Part I: A New Medium For Storytelling<br />“All the representational arts can be considered dangerously delusional, and the more entrancing they are, the more disturbing.” (Murray pg.. 18)<br />
  3. 3. Lord Burleigh’s Kiss<br />Holodeck: An elaborate virtual reality simulation room from 1987’s Star Trek: The Next Generation with realistically detailed “holonovels” that respond to actions of users, e.g. “Lucy Davenport”<br />“Digital dystopia”: Huxley, Bradbury, Tek War, Lawnmower Man<br />We rely on works of fiction, in any medium, to help us understand the world and what it means to be human. <br />Eventually all successful story-telling techniques become “transparent”: we lose consciousness of the medium and see neither print nor film but only the power of the story itself. <br />
  4. 4. Harbingers of The Holodeck<br />A “multiform story” presents a single situation or plotline in multiple versions that would be mutually exclusive in our ordinary experience <br />Film: It’s a Wonderful Life (1946), Back To The Future (1985), Groundhog Day (1993).<br />The Active Audience: Nexus, Marvel Comics, fan culture, Live Action Role Playing Games, e.g. Dungeons and Dragons<br />Multi-User Domains<br />Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games e.g. World of Warcraft<br />Virtual Worlds e.g. Second Life<br />3-D films, “movie rides,” storytelling in games (RPGs Assassin’s Creed II, Mass Effect), the use of hypertext, MIT virtual reality Media Lab<br />
  5. 5. From Additive To Expressive Form<br />The Four Essential Properties of Digital Environments<br />Procedural: ELIZA’s rules were recognizable as an interpretation of the world.<br />Future: make rule writing more available to writers<br />Participatory: ZORK’s creators scripted the participant.<br />Future: formulaic but flexible scripts<br />Spatial: ZORK dramatically represented navigable space.<br />Future: increase gracefulness of choreography<br />Encyclopedic:Both the Internet itself and SimCity hold vast amounts of information.<br />Future: interpretation of underlying values of “world”<br /> “The associational wilderness will acquire more coherence…better feel for which patterns of human experience can best be captured in digital media.” (p.93)<br />
  6. 6. Part II: The Aesthetics of the Medium<br />“Perhaps the next Shakespeare of this world will be a great live-action role-playing game master who is also an expert computer scientist.”<br />
  7. 7. Immersion<br />Surrendering mind to fictional world = “the willing suspension of disbelief.” But immersion = “the creation of belief.”<br />Need to test and understand boundaries that seem counterintuitive e.g. fusion of character and actor (Seinfeld), interaction of character with border of fictional world<br />Structuring Participation With:<br />Visits - “amusement park,” or “exploratory” (but we want to do more than just pass through)<br />Masks - avatars, virtual reality “smart costumes”<br />Collectively - Multiplayer worlds create interactive role-playing immersion through goals rooted in overall design of shared reality (LARPS, MUDS, now MMPRGS).<br />
  8. 8. Regulating Immersion<br />“Little by little we are discovering the conventions of participation that will constitute the fourth wall of this virtual theater, the expressive gestures that will deepen and preserve the enchantment of immersion.” (Murray p.125)<br />
  9. 9. Agency<br />We need the satisfaction of our actions and decisions having results; this is limited in traditional art but common in games.<br />Spatial navigation is pleasurable either within a maze (end point) or rhizome (no end point).<br />Terror and frustration of being “lost”  Satisfaction of exploration and discovery.<br />Application of real-world thinking to the virtual world.<br />Games as stories, symbolic dreams, contests of skill<br />
  10. 10. Constructivism<br />“As computer access spreads, it is likely that more and more people will turn from win/lose game playing to the collective construction of elaborate alternate worlds.” (Murray p.149)<br />
  11. 11. Transformation<br />Interactive, rotating “kaleidoscope” narratives; a shape-shifting world.<br />Collaborative creative efforts to make “morphing story environments e.g. Bronte sisters.<br />Enactment as a transformational experience in the positive or negative e.g. virtual therapy, MUD therapy.<br />“Electronic closure occurs when a work’s structure, not its plot, is understood.” (process-centered medium) <br />
  12. 12. Notes & Changes<br />Murray sees most existing games as violent/simplistic/based on skill contests. This is a 1997 view (Nintendo 64, Playstation)<br />Predictions for “needs” in digital narrative/gaming have been increasingly fulfilled.<br />However, digital narrative is still mostly beholden to the forms which it imitates and broader storytelling is absent.<br />Authorship is widespread in gaming today, beyond just the agency of players within the games.<br />

×