Karel Spee - Holst Centre

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Karel Spee - Holst Centre

  1. 1. Introduction to Organicand Printed ElectronicsKarel Speekarel.spee@tno.nl
  2. 2. Presentation overviewIntroduction - Societal challengesOrganic & Printed Electronics Advantages & ExamplesMarket predictionsPlayersSummaryIntroduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  3. 3. © Holst Centre < 4 We live in a rapidly changing world Society stands for a number of important challenges Organic & Printed Electronics will play an important role Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  4. 4. © Holst Centre < 5 Aging population Globalization Health Track and Trace Consciousness Authenticity Convenience Increasing Costs IndividualizationFood & Drug Safety Customization Appeal Poisoning Aesthetics Anti-tampering Increasing Population Environmental Issues Food & Energy Scarcity Scarcity of Materials Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  5. 5. © Holst Centre < 6 Aging populationHealtcare• More than 12% of the population are over the age of 65• The elderly population is forecast to increase from 86 million to 118 million over the next decade in Europe.• Collectively they make more than 25% of the physician’s office visits per annum.• Health care costs continuously rice (in USA >factor 4 over last 10 years) Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  6. 6. © Holst Centre < 7 Healthcare : Example dehydration • Among the elderly, chronic dehydration is a very common condition. An estimation of 7%, but maybe even as high as 28%, may be chronically dehydrated. • In USA one third of the 3 million elderly that reside in skilled nursing facilities suffer each year from dehydration during their stay. • In UK, 667 elderly persons have died from dehydration while living in aged care homes in the UK, in the past 5 years. Compared with 4885 due to falls and 2000 due to infections. [Nursing Times.net] • The European heat-wave of 2003 resulted in more than 30,000 deaths of elderly persons • Dehydration accounts for 1.4% of hospital admissions of persons over 65, with 1-year mortality of 48%. • Dehydration in the elderly is to a large extend preventable!Sources: UNEP, “Impacts of Summer 2003 Heatwave on Europe”, March 2004 Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  7. 7. © Holst Centre < 8 Increasing PopulationFood waste• In UK >17 million tonnes per year of food wastes  Almost 50% of this waste is in UK households• The average UK household spends 40 pounds per month on food and drink waste, 15% of food & drink shopping budget• The total avoidable fraction costs in the UK a total of 12 billion pounds per year an average of 480 pounds per household per year (15% of food & drinks shopping budget)• The average UK household generates 210 kg of avoidable food and drink waste per year• This generates the equivalent of ~0.8 tonnes of CO2 (2.4% of total greenhouse emissions associated with consumptions)• In NL  Almost 4 Billion EUR thrown away  Per family 325 EUR/year  50 kg per person; ~120 kg per familySource UK: WRAP report, ‘Household Food and Drink Waste in the UK’, Nov 2009 Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  8. 8. © Holst Centre < 9 Food SafetyFood borne diseases• The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (USA) estimate that more than 76 million cases of food-borne disease occur each year. Although most cases are mild, more than 325,000 people end up hospitalized.• In the US alone, the World Trade Organisation estimates that there are more than 76mn cases of food-borne disease a year, leading to 325,000 hospitalisations and more than 5,000 deaths.• The most important problem, is breaches in the cool chain. Solution: RFID tags with sensors Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  9. 9. © Holst Centre < 10Energy Increasing Population• Energy needs are still increasing• Present energy sources come for ~70% from fossil sources• The enormous amounts of CO2 waste from energy consumption causes dramatic climate changes.• Dramatic energy reductions and renewable energy sources are necessary Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  10. 10. © Holst Centre < 11Energy Increasing Population• >19% of all generated electricity goes to lighting!• OLED <1/25th of the consumption of an incandescent lamp and even <2/5 of that of a Compact Fluorescent lamp (CFL).• OLED displays – as little as 1/10th the power wrt LCD• The estimated energy payback time (regarding the carbon foot print) for OPV is 0.4 years, while for conventional solar cells this is still 2 to 5 years. Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  11. 11. Presentation overviewIntroduction - Societal challengesOrganic & Printed Electronics Advantages & ExamplesMarket predictionsPlayersSummaryIntroduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  12. 12. © Holst Centre < 13Organic and printed ElectronicsThey can be:• Low Cost• Produced in High VolumeUsing:• Roll-to-roll processing• Printing processes  As newspapers• Low-cost substrates  Plastic foils, paper• Low-cost materials  Polymers, No-Indium Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  13. 13. © Holst Centre < 14Organic and printed ElectronicsFurthermore they can be :• Thin and Conformal• Flexible• Wearable• Stretchable• Transparent• ‘non’-breakable• Foldable• Rollable• Made uniquelyWith:• Lower environmental impact Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  14. 14. © Holst Centre < 15 Why R2R processing? Why printing/coating from solution? Goal: cost efficient R2R productionLow Production Costs!  From rigid to flexible substrates  From cm² to m²• Solution processing (processing from  From S2S to R2R liquid) enables fast printing and coating technologies Advantages of flexible substrates• Easy to pattern  Flexible• High Speed  Any size, any shape• Large area  Non fragile• No expensive vacuum technology  From transparent to opaque• No time loss by waiting for vacuum  Light weight• Multiple layer deposition  Low cost Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  15. 15. © Holst Centre < 16 Flexible Electronics - Examples Flexible displays Plastic solar cells Touch screens Plastic batteries SignageSmartpackaging OLED RFID tags lighting Bio-sensors Smart bandage Electronic textiles Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  16. 16. © Holst Centre < 17Label & Sensors on the food marketManufacturer Trade nameTime-temperature indicators- LifeLines Technology Inc. FreshCheck-Vitsab Vitsab TTI- 3M Company Monitor Mark- Daymark Safety Systems DayMark Timestrip-TimeStrip Timestrip-IntroTech WarmMark- Ciba Speciality Chemicals OnVuOxygen indicators- Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co., Ltd, Japan Ageless-eye- Toppan Printing Co., Ltd, Japan -- Toagosei Chem. Industry Co., Ltd, Japan -- Finetec Co., Ltd, Japan Sanso-CheckerCO2 indicators- Cryovac-Sealed Air Limited, USA Tufflex GSFreshness indicators- Cox Recorders, USA FreshTag Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  17. 17. © Holst Centre < 18Label & Sensors for the food marketSensors + electronics• Electronic sensors• Memory + Logics• Radio (UHV, NFC) + Antenna Development stage• Ultimate goal fully printed Concept• Intermediate stage with embedded chips Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  18. 18. © Holst Centre < 19 Smart Labels for Packaging Solutions Advice - usageInformation - preparation- wireless readout - expiry date- logistics Identification - anti counterfeit - trackingCostumer instructions- how- when Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  19. 19. © Holst Centre < 20Smart Systems: technology demonstrators• Smart bandages• Sensors in foil• Smart labels• Smart blisters• etc Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  20. 20. © Holst Centre < 21Printed Electronics Graphics• Source: Ynvisible Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  21. 21. © Holst Centre < 22Interactive cards• Source: Ynvisible Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  22. 22. © Holst Centre < 23Toys: interactive games • Source: OE-A Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  23. 23. © Holst Centre < 24Interactive grocerybag• Source: E-Ink and Lenart Studios Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  24. 24. © Holst Centre < 25Moisture sensor for houseplants Interactive moisture sensor. The display is activated by putting the metal feets in a plant pot• Source: Ynvisible Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  25. 25. © Holst Centre < 26In-Store sales advice displayL’Oréal developed in collaboration with Ynvisible a PE display. Ithelps consumers to pick a perfume.Source: Plastic Electronics Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  26. 26. © Holst Centre < 27Smart measuring tape• Stores three measurements in the PE display.• Source: E-Ink and Lenart Studios Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  27. 27. © Holst Centre < 28Interactive cutting board This cutting board stores recipes and shows them through a PE display while preparing the food. • Source: E-Ink en Axis Design Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  28. 28. © Holst Centre < 29Electronic toll pass Combination of PE RFID, solarcel, battery and display. Driver can easily see the costs per toll road and the saldo on• Source: E-Ink en Axis Design his/her account. Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  29. 29. © Holst Centre < 30Electronics in magazine Source: E-Ink™ Esquire cover (October 2008) Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  30. 30. © Holst Centre < 31Electronics in magazine• Circuitry: entirely printed• Partners  Nteras Innovations  Switchable Electrochromic Images by Advanced Materials  NanoChromics  Printed Batteries (Blue Spark)  Etc.www.printedelectronicscover.comSource: The February 2011 issue of Canvas Magazine Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  31. 31. © Holst Centre < 32StoraEnso• Blister packages• Voting cards Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  32. 32. © Holst Centre < 33Holst Blister Proto-type• Features  3 chip solution (MC, RTC, NFC Eeprom)  All electronics in footprint blister  Printed resistance ladder  Monitor when en what pill is pushed through  NFC communication Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  33. 33. © Holst Centre < 34Paperdisplay.se• PaperDisplay, which is located in Norrkoping, Sweden, manufactures and sells low cost displays printed on paper substrates for applications in smart labels, smart packaging, printed matters, etc. Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  34. 34. © Holst Centre < 35PE cosmetic treatments• Anti-wrinkle• Anti fungus treatment• Source: Power Paper Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  35. 35. © Holst Centre < 36Flexible Organic PV modules• Double glazing• Blinds• Luxaflex• Airplane wings• Trucks roofs• Tents• Shadings• Solar chargers Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  36. 36. Presentation overviewIntroduction - Societal challengesOrganic & Printed Electronics Advantages & ExamplesMarket predictionsPlayersSummaryIntroduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  37. 37. © Holst Centre < 38Total Market sizes in 2010• $3 trillion healthcare disposables market• $3 trillion consumer packaged goods market• $1.3 trillion electronics market• $430 billion packaging market• $250 billion silicon chip market• $200 billion publishing market• $120 billion electronic displays market• $65 billion lighting market But in 2010• $40 billion cosmetics market only very small• $30 billion sensors market fraction is organic• $15 billion solar cell market and/or printed Printed and potentially printed electronics reach $9.4 billion in 2012 Source: IDtechEx 2010 IDTEchEx 2012 Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  38. 38. © Holst Centre < 39IDTechEx 2012-2022 Status & Forecast Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  39. 39. © Holst Centre < 40Frost & Sullivan forecast• Slightly more conservative than IDTechEx Source: http://www.frost.com/prod/servlet/market-insight-top.pag Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  40. 40. © Holst Centre < 41Market Predictions Semiconductor Market Source: IDTechEx In 10-20 years from now organic and/or printed electronics will become substantial part of the market Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  41. 41. © Holst Centre < 42OLED for Lighting Yole: http://www.i-micronews.com/reports/OLED-Lighting/14/329/ However according to Lux Research product cost have to drop below 200 EUR/m2 in order for the market to grow > 60 MEUR Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  42. 42. © Holst Centre < 43Nanomarket Top Applications: 2005-2010 (Cumulative Sales - $ Millions)35003000 Printed2500200015001000 500 0 RFIDs OLED Displays Backplanes Memories Photovoltaics Smart cards and ticketing Sensors Toys and novelties Membrane keyboard Otherwww.nanomarkets.net © NanoMarkets, LC Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  43. 43. © Holst Centre < 44 Market for OPV • Predictions for 2015 range from 50 Million$ to 1.5 Billion $Global market for OPV 2005 –2025 in billion Dollars (IDTechEx) OPV Market Size variation by scenario (LuxResearch [4]) However if sufficient efficiency and lifetime are met a market percentage of at least 10% is predicted Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  44. 44. © Holst Centre < 45Powered Smart Card Markets - 2012Nanomarket estimates:• Current value of about $70 million• Will grow to about $8.5 billion by the year 2019• which corresponds to over 1.8 billion powered smart cards shipped.• The value of thin film and/or printed batteries for such smart cards will grow from just over $7.5 million today to $365 million in 2019• The value of small information displays used in powered smart cards with grow from about $7 million today to over $715 million. Source: Nanomarkets Oct 2012: Powered Smart Card Markets- 2012 Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  45. 45. Presentation overviewIntroduction - Societal challengesOrganic & Printed Electronics Advantages & ExamplesMarket predictionsPlayersSummaryIntroduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  46. 46. © Holst Centre < 47Value chain Source: http://www.aistrupconsulting.com/PrintedElectronics.aspx Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  47. 47. © Holst Centre < 48Players in this market• According to Nanomarkets for thin-film transistors, memories, batteries, sensors, displays and lighting important companies & organisations are:  Agilent, Bank of America, Bemis, DuPont Teijin, eBay, E Ink, Enfucell, Esquire Magazine, Fujifilm Dimatix, GE, Gemalto, HelioVolt, Holst Centre, ISET, Jenn Feng, Kovio, MasterCard, Merck, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, Nanosolar, Oxford Photovoltaics, PARC, Pioneer, PolyIC, PragmaticIC, Pragmatic Printing, Plastic Logic, Printed Electronics Limited, Qolpac, Samsung, Seiko Epson, SolarPrint, Sumitomo, Thin Film Electronics, Tokyo Electron, and UDC.  Source: Nanomarkets Nov 2012 report: Printed Electronics Version 3.0: A Market Forecast• Lux research has 350 companies in this field profiled  Source: Lux Research Client Portal• IDTechEx mentions the following companies:  ACREO, Agfa Orgacon, Asahi Kasei, Asahi Glass, BASF, Cambrios, DaiNippon Printing, E Ink, Evonik, Fujifilm Dimatix, G24i, Hereaus, Hewlett Packard, Holst Centre, InkTec, ITRI Taiwan, Konarka, Kovio Inc, Merck Chemicals, Optomec, Phil1ps, Plastic Logic, Plextronics, PolyIC, Samsung, Soligie, Thinfilm, Toppan Forms, Toppan Printing, University of Tokyo, Waseda University  Source: Printed, Organic & Flexible Electronics Forecasts, Players & Opportunities 2012-2022 Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  48. 48. © Holst Centre < 49Industrial partners @ Holst for O&PE Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  49. 49. © Holst Centre < 50Partners across the value-chain R&D Materials Equipment End-users Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  50. 50. Presentation overviewIntroduction - Societal challengesOrganic & Printed Electronics Advantages & ExamplesMarket predictionsPlayersSummaryIntroduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  51. 51. © Holst Centre < 52Conclusions• Future society will need low cost, high volume electronic products which are flexible and/or conformable, including low- cost sensors, displays, radio, etc, with low-energy use and energy scavaging.• Market Growth has started for niche products• Large market volume will start with non-flexible substrates  E.g. OLED for Displays and Lighting• Higher volume products on flex foil will only be available in 5-10 years from now  Technology & production capabilities need far more R&D• Market predictions on the long end however are enormous  In about 10 years > 50 billion growing to over 500 billion in >20 years Introduction to Organic & Printed Electronics – Mikrocentrum Themadag
  52. 52. Visit us atwww.holstcentre.com

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