Doing Dialogue:
Using multi-stakeholder processes as a tool to
reduce conflict and address deforestation
in the forest sec...
About this presentation
1. Introduction multi-stakeholder
processes and the work of The
Forests Dialogue (TFD)
2. Lessons ...
Why dialogue on natural resource
use & land management issues?
• Public natural capital assets – usually held “in
trust” b...
Global Partners
Recent Donors
TFD’s mission has evolved
since 2000
PURPOSE: Better forests, improved
livelihoods. To contribute to sustainable
land and ...
Key Forest Challenges
2000-2013
• Sustainable management
verification via forest certification
• Coming together to fight ...
What has TFD
accomplished?
• Built trust and created a
network and resource for
leaders
• Provided a credible neutral
plat...
Doing
Dialogue
The Phased Approach
1. ‘ENGAGE’: Identify key
issues, build trust, share
perspectives and
information.
2. ‘...
Doing Dialogue
Typical steps
• Issue identification and clarification
• Preparatory work and collation of
background paper...
What dialogue does
not/cannot do
• Conferences! Few
presentations, no panels
• Lead projects on the ground
- but can suppo...
The Forests Dialogue
@ Indonesia
11
Intensively Managed
Planted Forests (IMPF)
Process
• Pekanbaru and Kerinci,
Indonesia
• March 2007
• 70 International and ...
IMPF Dialogue Conclusions
Challenges
• Marginalization of communities =
insecure tenure and rights
• Social conflict = ina...
Free, Prior and
Informed Consent (FPIC)
Process
• Pekanbaru, Pangean, and Teluk
Meranti, Indonesia
• October 2010
• 80 Int...
FPIC Dialogue Conclusions
Challenges
• 60-90 million people live within
forested areas, < 40% land titled, <
0.2% allocate...
Investing in Locally
Controlled Forestry (ILCF)
Process
• Yogyakarta, Indonesia
• February 2012
• 55 International and Nat...
ILCF Dialogue Conclusions
Challenges
• Widening gap of raw material supply
• LCF on margin of forest policy and
economic d...
The Forests Dialogue – new focus
on deforestation drivers
18
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Doing Dialogue: Using multi-stakeholder processes as a tool to reduce conflict and address deforestation in the forest sector

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Presentation given on 27 June 2013 at the Tropical Forest Alliance Conference in Indonesia. Presented by:
James Griffiths World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
Marcus Colchester, Forest Peoples Program (FPP)
Rod Taylor, WWF International

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Doing Dialogue: Using multi-stakeholder processes as a tool to reduce conflict and address deforestation in the forest sector

  1. 1. Doing Dialogue: Using multi-stakeholder processes as a tool to reduce conflict and address deforestation in the forest sector James Griffiths, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) Marcus Colchester, Forest Peoples Program (FPP) Rod Taylor, WWF International Tropical Forest Alliance 27 June 2013 (14:40-15:00) Jakarta, Indonesia
  2. 2. About this presentation 1. Introduction multi-stakeholder processes and the work of The Forests Dialogue (TFD) 2. Lessons learned from TFD’s Indonesian Dialogues 3. Avoided Deforestation and the 4F’s Initiative Learning Objective Improved understanding how outcomes-orientated multi- stakeholder approaches can be developed as a solution option – because they share diverse perspectives, can build trust and help develop or support collaborative approaches
  3. 3. Why dialogue on natural resource use & land management issues? • Public natural capital assets – usually held “in trust” by governments or regulated if privately owned or leased or community managed • Forests generate multiple goods and services for multiple beneficiaries • Multi-stakeholder approach can improve decision making on long term management, use and benefit sharing • Help manage the real risk of mismanagement 3
  4. 4. Global Partners Recent Donors
  5. 5. TFD’s mission has evolved since 2000 PURPOSE: Better forests, improved livelihoods. To contribute to sustainable land and resource use, the conservation and sustainable management of forests, and improved livelihoods by helping people engage and explore difficult issues, find collaborative solutions, and make positive changes. MISSION: Dialoguing can bring change. To pursue our purpose through constructive dialogue processes among all key stakeholders, based on mutual trust, enhanced understanding and commitment to change. Our dialogues are designed to build relationships and to spur collaborative action on the highest priority issues facing the world’s forests.
  6. 6. Key Forest Challenges 2000-2013 • Sustainable management verification via forest certification • Coming together to fight illegal logging • Biodiversity conservation on production forests – Intensively managed planted forests – Genetically modified trees • Forests for livelihoods – Pro-poor commercial forestry – Investing in locally controlled forestry • The role of forests in mitigating climate change and the prospects of REDD+ • Implementing Free, Prior, and Informed Consent
  7. 7. What has TFD accomplished? • Built trust and created a network and resource for leaders • Provided a credible neutral platform for all stakeholders, but particularly marginalized groups • Catalyst for partnerships • Promoted policy leadership • Pushed for behavior change • Developed a large body of information (or soft policy) • Legacy impacts
  8. 8. Doing Dialogue The Phased Approach 1. ‘ENGAGE’: Identify key issues, build trust, share perspectives and information. 2. ‘EXPLORE’: Seek consensus about challenges and opportunities to solve a forest-related ‘fracture-line’. 3 ‘CHANGE’: Promote and facilitate actions that lead to solutions, with impact in policy and on the ground.
  9. 9. Doing Dialogue Typical steps • Issue identification and clarification • Preparatory work and collation of background papers • Invitation of stakeholders • Establishment of ground rules • Sharing experience • Exploration of views • Analysis and constructive argument • Decisions and prioritization of action steps or agreed recommendations • Types of dialogue – scoping, in-field, policy options, report writing
  10. 10. What dialogue does not/cannot do • Conferences! Few presentations, no panels • Lead projects on the ground - but can support • Bring funding to locals - but can highlight needs • Mediate or negotiate 2 party issues – but can share • Solve problems for you - but can explore & provide options • Make change – but can catalyze, promote and support change
  11. 11. The Forests Dialogue @ Indonesia 11
  12. 12. Intensively Managed Planted Forests (IMPF) Process • Pekanbaru and Kerinci, Indonesia • March 2007 • 70 International and National stakeholders • Hosted by WWF and April Objectives • Understand driving forces of expansion and develop agreed strategies to address environmental and social challenges
  13. 13. IMPF Dialogue Conclusions Challenges • Marginalization of communities = insecure tenure and rights • Social conflict = inadequate governance • Mill capacity driving forest conversion Ways Forward • Private sector as vehicle for Sustainable Development • Private sector can be proactive in terms of community rights and use • Labor and supply contracts with locals bring varied benefits • Avoided deforestation and REDD may provide opportunities
  14. 14. Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) Process • Pekanbaru, Pangean, and Teluk Meranti, Indonesia • October 2010 • 80 International and National stakeholders • Hosted by Kemitraan, FPP and Scale up Objectives • Examine and learn lessons from real world examples where consent-based approaches have been, or are being, used
  15. 15. FPIC Dialogue Conclusions Challenges • 60-90 million people live within forested areas, < 40% land titled, < 0.2% allocated to communities • Obstacles and confusion in law and policy over FPIC led to land conflicts • Some companies seeking to develop practical implementation of FPIC Ways Forward • For FPIC to work, companies need to recognize rights to land, livelihoods • All parties need support to build capacity to engage with one another • Emphasizing the “prior” in FPIC will greatly reduce conflict • Government should endorse company-community agreements
  16. 16. Investing in Locally Controlled Forestry (ILCF) Process • Yogyakarta, Indonesia • February 2012 • 55 International and National stakeholders • Hosted by Telapak and the Forest Trust Objectives • Identify actions necessary to increase partnerships and investments in locally controlled forestry between communities and companies
  17. 17. ILCF Dialogue Conclusions Challenges • Widening gap of raw material supply • LCF on margin of forest policy and economic development • Complex and costly administration • Lack of access to financial tools Ways Forward • Create links to buyers • Transparency for all parties • Enabling investment as a precursor to asset investment • Use credit unions to assist with cash flow, build associations for LCF • Gear partnerships toward investment • Persuade policy makers to support ILCF • Clarify expectations for communities and investors
  18. 18. The Forests Dialogue – new focus on deforestation drivers 18
  19. 19. Forests, Food, Fuel and Fibre (4Fs) Farmland Plantation Other ecosystems Unlogged forest Logged forest 2010
  20. 20. The Big Squeeze Do Nothing in 2050 High greenhouse gas emissions Huge decline in biodiversity
  21. 21. The 4Fs Challenge Policy Innovation to - • Enable forestry and farming practices that produce more with less land, water and pollution • Encourage new consumption patterns that meet the needs of the poor while eliminating waste and over-consumption by the affluent • Reconcile competing claims for land and water for different needs (e.g. food and energy security, biodiversity conservation, carbon sequestration) • Ensure that Indigenous peoples can give or withhold their free, prior and informed consent to activities affecting their land and resources • Encourage local economies that are green and inclusive
  22. 22. Thank You! The Forests Dialogue Secretariat Yale University New Haven, CT, USA +1 203 432 5966 tfd@yale.edu www.theforestsdialogue.org TFD Documents and Publications Available electronically in English at: www.theforestsdialogue.org Follow us on Twitter: @forestsdialogue Like us on Facebook: the forests dialogue

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