Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Cash Transfers & Dignity: Lessons from the Transfer Project

965 views

Published on

Frank Otchere's presentation at the Universal Child Grants conference in Geneva from 6-8 February 2018.

Our Social Policy Specialist discussed Transfer Project evidence on the effects of cash transfers on dignity and community involvement, as well as discussing the implications of programme design.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Cash Transfers & Dignity: Lessons from the Transfer Project

  1. 1. CASH TRANSFERS & DIGNITY: LESSONS FROM THE TRANSFER PROJECT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON UNIVERSAL CHILD GRANTS 6-8 February 2019 | Geneva FRANK OTCHERE Social Policy Specialist, UNICEF Office of Research Innocenti
  2. 2. The Transfer Project is a multi- country, multi-institutional collaborative study of large-scale, government cash and cash+ programmes. Working in 13 countries in Africa and the Middle East: Ghana, Ethiopia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. TRANSFER.CPC.UNC.EDU THE TRANSFER PROJECT
  3. 3. PROGRAMME FEATURES & DIGNITY ELIGIBILITY & ENROLMENT Means tested approaches demanding and still error prone. Fear of not qualifying during re-assessment can be a negative incentive to livelihood. TRANSFER SIZE ~20% of baseline consumption; regular adjustment to keep the real value; amount differentiated by household size. MODE OF PAYMENT Increasing transition to e-payments, reducing the drudgery and cost of travel to collect payments, and promoting financial inclusion. ADMINISTRATION Flexibility on recipient; clarity on reference beneficiary; respect for beneficiaries; regular payments; and transparent communication.
  4. 4. No direct measure of ‘dignity’. Consistent evidence on dignity-enhancing impacts of improved food security, household resilience, material wellbeing and subjective wellbeing. TRANSFER IMPACTS & DIGNITY
  5. 5. “My self- esteem has been high because I no longer borrow money from people and I am also able to support others when they are in need. For instance, my younger siblings. So no more embarrassment when someone asks for support and I am unable to help.” - A mother in Karaga, Ghana
  6. 6. “It is sad when you see your neighbour’s children starving or not able to go to school because of money, and you can’t help. I am happy for the programme and the households getting it. But we are all poor too and need it.” - Community Participant, Zimbabwe
  7. 7. “In the past we used to have trouble getting food for the household because we had no money to use to buy it but now with Mtukula Pakhomo money, I am able to buy and provide this household with maize food. In the past we used to eat once in a day but now we are able to eat three times a day.” - Agnes, Malawi
  8. 8. “Even me, I am a person now, too.” - Transfer recipient in Tanzania
  9. 9. REFLECTIONS ON UCG UNIVERSAL COVERAGE FOR HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN IDEAL Raising the floor and ensuring that no child is left behind. BENCHMARKING Findings on transfer size should provide useful benchmark for costing. IMPLEMENTATION IS CRITICAL A pure ‘per child’ transfer, or take into account the composition of the household. Same amount per child, or vary by household status.
  10. 10. THANK YOU FRANK OTCHERE fotchere@unicef.org

×