Cross-border Supply Chain BRS is now open for public review ...

506 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
506
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cross-border Supply Chain BRS is now open for public review ...

  1. 1. 1 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS Business Requirements Specification TBG2 Cross-Border Supply Chain (UNeDocs) Business Domain: Cross-Border Supply Chain Business Processes: Cross-Border Trade, Transport, Finance, Insurance, Border Clearance (Customs & Other Governmental Authorities (OGAs)) Document ID: TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS Version: 1.0 Release: 1 1Date: March 2007 2Page: 1/15 24/05/2010
  2. 2. 3 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 2Document History 3 4March 2007 Version 1.0 developed from version 3.0 of the UNeDocs Scope 5 Document in collaboration with TBG3 and TBG14. 4Page: 2/15 24/05/2010
  3. 3. 5 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 61 Table of Contents 7 81 TABLE OF CONTENTS..........................................................................................3 92 REFERENCES..........................................................................................................4 103 OBJECTIVES & INTRODUCTION......................................................................5 114 SCOPE - POSITIONING UNEDOCS IN RELATION TO THE 12INTERNATIONAL SUPPLY CHAIN REFERENCE MODEL.............................6 4.1 SCOPE COMPARISON..............................................................................................................6 4.2 SCENARIO INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................7 135 BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS................................................................................9 5.1 “BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS” VIEWS..........................................................................................9 14 5.1.1 Commercial Processes................................................................................10 15 5.1.2 Logistical (Transport) Processes................................................................10 16 5.1.3 Regulatory Processes..................................................................................11 17 5.1.4 Financial Processes....................................................................................11 5.2 PARTICIPATING PARTIES.......................................................................................................11 5.3 BUSINESS ENTITIES AND BUSINESS RULES..............................................................................13 18 6Page: 3/15 24/05/2010
  4. 4. 7 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 192 References 20 21 • UNeDocs Project Proposal v5 (TBG2-2005-10-5) 22 23 • UNeDocs Scope Document v3 (TBG2-2006-25-3) 24 25 • UN/CEFACT BPAWG Reference Model of the International Supply 26 Chain V1.0 March 2003. (UN/CEFACT/BPA/PB044) 27 28 • UN/CEFACT Modelling Methodology (UMM) v1.0 29 30 • UN/CEFACT Core Component Technical Specification v2.01 (CCTS/ 31 ISO15000-5) 32 33 • UN/CEFACT Core Component Library v0.6A 34 35 • United Nations Trade Data Elements Directory (UNTDED/ISO 36 7372) 37 38 • UN/CEFACT Recommendation No. 1 - United Nations Layout Key 39 (UNLK) 40 41 • SITPRO ElecTra International Document System & v1.2 42 UNeDocsUK 43 44 • UNECE United Nations electronic Trade Documents (UNeDocs) 45 version 0.4 8Page: 4/15 24/05/2010
  5. 5. 9 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 463 Objectives & Introduction 47 48 The objective of this BRS is to describe the requirements for a generic data 49 model supporting the processes involved in the cross border supply chain and 50 covering at a high-level the involved business areas, the main parties and the 51 information involved. 52 53 This BRS, in combination with the ISCRM developed by TBG14 and in 54 combination with the detailed BRSs from the related TBG WGs, will provide the 55 framework for any cross-border related business and government domains to 56 specify their own specific information exchange requirements whilst complying 57 with the overall process and data structures. 58 59 Derivative information exchange specifications will be able to be developed to 60 support the requirements of conventional UN/CEFACT data exchange formats 61 for UN aligned paper documents, UN/EDIFACT or UN/CEFACT XML messages 62 as well as information exchanges to support web based processes such as 63 those required for Single Windows implementations. 64 65 United Nations electronic Trade Documents (UNeDocs) is a project of the 66 United Nations Centre for Trade Facilitation and Electronic Business 67 (UN/CEFACT). The objectives of this project is to develop, publish and maintain 68 a Business Standard which can be applied by countries, regions or industries to 69 provide the definitions of contextualised data exchange documents which can 70 be integrated into software solutions for traders, carriers, freight forwarders, 71 agents, banks, Customs and Other Governmental Authorities etc. 72 73 UNeDocs takes a holistic approach which develops a canonical data model 74 which brings together the data exchange requirements of international trade, 75 transport, finance, insurance, Customs and other regulatory documents based 76 on the integration of trade facilitation and e-Business best practices. 77 78 The UN/CEFACT UNeDocs Business Standard will include paper and electronic 79 document structures which have been derived from the UNeDocs canonical 80 data model. Derivation from this canonical data model ensures that each 81 UNeDocs paper or electronic document specification is an individual 82 implementation of a document development methodology which follows the 83 aligned concepts described in UNECE Recommendation 1, the UN Layout Key 84 (UNLK). This ensures that traders can choose the type of document technology 85 that best meets their business requirements and technology capabilities and 86 also provides a migration path for the adoption of new technologies. 87 88 These business requirements have been developed by means of a close co- 89 operation between trade, transport, finance, insurance, customs and other 90 regulatory authorities document users. The UNeDocs project is a TBG cross- 91 domain project which is managed by the TBG ‘Digital Paper’ Working Group 92 (TBG2). 93 10Page: 5/15 24/05/2010
  6. 6. 11 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 944 Scope - Positioning UNeDocs in relation to 95 the International Supply Chain Reference 96 Model 97 98 This section describes the aspects of the international purchase and supply 99 chain covered by the UNeDocs project and relates them to the UN/CEFACT 100 Reference Model of the International Supply Chain v2001 (ISCRM). 101 102 The extent and limits of the business processes described in this document 103 have been developed in such as way that it allows application of the UneDocs 104 Business Standard for implementations of national, regional or industry specific 105 cross-border scenarios. In addition only the high-level process descriptions are 106 described in order that the detailed process analysis of the involved TBG 107 Domain Groups can provide the detailed process requirements in their 108 published Business Requirements Specifications (BRSs). See section 5. 109 1104.1 Scope Comparison 111 112 The ISCRM Reference Model covers the processes following the recognition of 113 need by a Customer for a product or service up until the fulfilment of an order 114 by a Supplier and the resulting financial settlement. In addition to the business 115 processes associated with cross-border trading it also incorporates the 116 necessary logistical and cross-border regulatory activities which may be 117 required by Intermediaries and Authorities. 118 119 This is illustrated in the following use case diagram. Check Credit includes Identify Potential Trading Partner Manufacture includes Establish Agreement (Sales) Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Customer Order Supplier Buyer (Sales) Seller Invoicee Manufacturer Payor Invoicer Importer Payee Consignee Exporter Transport Services Buyer Consignor Ship Transport Services Buyer (Transport/Border Clearance) Pay (Sales) Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Authority Intermediary Customs Transport Services Provider OGAs Bank Chambers of Commerce Credit Agency Port Health Customs Agent Inspection Insurer Licensing etc. etc. UNeDocs 120 12Page: 6/15 24/05/2010
  7. 7. 13 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 121 Figure1. Use case Diagram-International Supply Chain Model 122 1234.2 Scenario introduction 124 125 The scope of the UNeDocs project can be expressed as a subset of the scope 126 of the UN/CEFACT International Supply Chain Reference Model (ISCRM) 127 covering the quotation, ordering and transportation of goods through to 128 invoicing. However, not all aspects of these processes are covered in the initial 129 phase. 130 131 The ISCRM covers processes in the four main business areas - Commercial, 132 Logistics, Regulatory and Financial as illustrated in Figures 2 and 3. The 133 UNeDocs project supports the processes across the Commercial, Logistics 134 (Transport) and Regulatory Areas. See Section 5. INTERNATIONAL TRADE TRANSACTION PROCESSES SHIP/ BUY PAY DELIVER Prepare Prepare For Export Transport Import for Import Export INVOLVING Commercial Transport Regulatory Financial Procedures Procedures Procedures Procedures • Establish Sales • Establish • Obtain • Provide Credit Contract Transport Contract Import/Export Rating • Order Goods or • Collect, Move and Licences etc • Provide Insurance Services Deliver Goods • Provide Customs • Provide Credit • Advise On • Provide Waybills, Declarations • Execute Payment Delivery Goods Receipts • Provide Cargo • Issue Statements • Request Payment Status Reports Declaration etc.. • Apply Trade Security Procedures • Clear Goods for Export/Import 135 136 Figure 2. Business processes within the four main Business Areas 14Page: 7/15 24/05/2010
  8. 8. 15 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS International Supply Chain Processes and Procedures Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Commercial Customer/Buyer Order Goods Supplier/Seller Deliver Pay for Goods Logistical Intermediary/Carrier Order Transport Supplier/Consignor Ship Goods Customer/Consignee Pay Carrier Regulatory Issue Licence Customer/Importer Authority /Customs & OGAs Clear Goods Supplier/Exporter Pay Duties Intermediary/Carrier Financial Intermediary/Bank Instruct Payment Customer/Payor Credit/Debit Accounts Supplier/Payee Provide Statements 137 138 Figure 3. Key Actors/Roles associated with the four main Business Areas 16Page: 8/15 24/05/2010
  9. 9. 17 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 1395 Business requirements 1405.1 “Business requirements” views 141 AS described in Section 4.2 above the UNeDocs process scope may be viewed 142 as four interrelated business areas representing Commercial, Logistics 143 (Transport), Regulatory and Financial processes together with the 144 corresponding information used both within each business area and which 145 passes between them. The following two diagrams describe these areas in 146 terms of the key governing contracts – the Sales Order Contract and the 147 Transport Service Contract – and these diagrams also show the relationships 148 between the four areas together with an indication of the documentary 149 requirements. The Sales Order Contract Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Customer Supplier Buyer Seller Final Consignee Original Consignor Importer Exporter Transport Services Buyer Transport Services Buyer International Purchase and Supply Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Authority Intermediary Customs Transport Services Provider OGAs Carrier Certification Authority Freight Forwarder Chamber of Commerce Bank Customs Agent Insurer Establish Identify Potential Order Ship Pay Sales Partner Agreement (Transport/Border (Sales) (Sales) (Sales) Clearance) Sales Sales Sales Quotation Order Transport Service Contract Border Clearance(s) Invoice Establish Provide Order Pay Transport Transort Import/Export (Transport) (Transport) Agreement Services Declarations Cargo and Trasnit Reports Origin and other Certificates See Figure 5 for more details 150 151 Figure 4. The Sales Order Contract view 152 153 Figure 4 shows that, for the Sales Order Contract, the Establish Business 154 Agreement, Order, Ship and Pay use cases are within the scope of UNeDocs. 155 However, only the quotation process is included in the Establish Business 156 Agreement use case and only invoicing is included within the Pay use case. 157 18Page: 9/15 24/05/2010
  10. 10. 19 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS The Transport Service Contract Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Customer Supplier Transport Services Buyer Transport Services Provider Consignee/Consignor Carrier/Freight Forwarder International Transportation Actors/Roles Actors/Roles Authority Intermediary Customs Terminal Operator Port Health Authority Haulier Inspection Agency etc. etc. Identify Establish Ship Potential Transport Order Pay Agreement (Provide Transport Provider (Transport) (Transport) (Transport) Services) Sea Waybill Cargo Report Freight Booking Shipping Invoice Instructions Negotiable B/L Transit Report Freight Air Waybill Forwarders Status Report Instructions Road Waybill (CMR) Rail Waybill (CIM) 158 159 Figure 5. The Transport Service Contract view 160 161 Figure 5 shows that, for the Transport Services Contract, the Establish Business 162 Agreement, Order, Ship and Pay use cases are within the scope of UNeDocs. 163 However, only the booking process is included in the Establish Business 164 Agreement use case and only invoicing is included within the Pay use case. The 165 UNeDocs scope therefore includes the transport booking, transport ordering 166 and freight invoicing processes together with the actual transportation and the 167 required border clearance processes. 1685.1.1 Commercial Processes 169 Covers: 170 • Issuing of Quotation, 171 • Confirmation of Sales Order, 172 • Issuing of Despatch Advice and Packing List, 173 • Sales Invoicing 174 175 To be defined separately in conjunction with TBG1 and TBG14 1765.1.2 Logistical (Transport) Processes 177 Covers: 178 • Booking of Cargo Space, 179 • Issuing of Shipping Instructions, 180 • Issuing of Transport Contract Document (AirWaybill, etc.), 181 • Transportation of Goods, 182 • Requesting and Issuing of Transport Status Reports 183 • Freight Invoicing 184 185 To be defined separately in conjunction with TBG3, TBG1 and TBG14 20Page: 10/15 24/05/2010
  11. 11. 21 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 1865.1.3 Regulatory Processes 187 Covers reporting to Customs or appropriate Other Governmental Agencies: 188 • Import/Export Declarations, 189 • Cargo and Transit Reports, 190 • Certificates of Origin, 191 • Phytosanitary Certificates, 192 • Dangerous Goods Declarations including OECD Hazardous Waste 193 notifications 194 • etc. 195 196 To be defined separately in conjunction with TBG4, TBG13, TBG18 and TBG14. 1975.1.4 Financial Processes 198 Covers: 199 • Documentary Credit procedures, 200 • Cargo Insurance 201 202 To be defined separately in conjunction with TBG5, TBG1 and TBG14. 2035.2 Participating Parties 204 205 There are potentially many parties participating in the cross-border 206 international purchase and supply chain. These parties can be grouped into 207 four main categories as indicated in the table below: 208 209 Trade/Transport/Customs Party Roles 210 Sales Order Transport Service Contract Definition Contract Seller Original Consignor/Original The party selling goods or services as Shipper stipulated in a Sales Order Contract. Buyer Final Consignee/Ultimate The party to whom goods are sold services Consignee as stipulated in a Sales Order Contract. Transport Services Buyer The buyer of transport services as (Consignor or Consignee) stipulated in a Transport Service Contract. Transport Services Provider The provider i.e. seller of transport (Carrier or Freight Forwarder) services as stipulated in a Transport Service Contract. Consignor The party consigning goods as stipulated in a Transport Service Contract. Consignee The party receiving a consignment of goods as stipulated in a Transport Service Contract. Carrier The party which provides transport services. Freight Forwarder The party undertaking the forwarding of goods by provision of transport, logistics, associated formalities services etc. Despatch Party The party where goods are collected or taken over by the transport services provider. Operational term is ‘Pick-up Place’. 22Page: 11/15 24/05/2010
  12. 12. 23 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS Delivery Party The party to which goods should be delivered by the transport services provider. Operational term is ‘Place of Positioning’. Ship From Original Despatch Party The party from whom goods will be or have been originally shipped. Ship To Final Delivery Party/Ultimate The party to whom goods will be or have Delivery Party been ultimately shipped. 211 212 213 Buyer 214 The party stipulated as the party to whom goods or services are sold. The 215 primary role of the Customer as specified in a Sales Order Contract is the 216 Buyer and other possible roles include the Final/Ultimate Consignee, Transport 217 Services Buyer, Importer and Invoicee. 218 219 Importer 220 The party who makes, or on whose behalf a Customs clearing agent or other 221 authorized person makes, an import declaration. This may include a person 222 who has possession of the goods or to whom the goods are consigned. 223 224 Invoicee 225 The party to whom an invoice is issued. 226 227 Seller 228 The party stipulated as the supplier of goods or services. The primary role of 229 the Supplier as specified in the Sales Order Contract is the Seller and other 230 possible roles include the Original Consignor/Shipper, Transport Services 231 Buyer, Exporter, and Invoice Issuer. 232 233 Transport Service Buyer 234 The party stipulated as the buyer of transport services in a Transport Service 235 Contract. The Transport Service Buyer role may be performed by either the 236 Consignor or the Consignee depending on the Terms of Delivery specified in 237 the associated Sales Order Contract. 238 239 Exporter 240 The party who makes, or on whose behalf the export declaration is made, and 241 who is the owner of the goods or has similar rights of disposal over them at 242 the time when the declaration is accepted. 243 244 Invoice issuer 245 The party who issues an invoice. 246 247 Intermediary 248 Within the international purchase and supply chain, an Intermediary can be 249 any party who provides services to support either the Sales Order Contract or 250 the Transport Service Contract. The possible roles of an Intermediary include 251 the Transport Service Provider (e.g. Carrier, Freight Forwarder), Financial 252 Institution or Customs Agent etc. 253 254 Authority 24Page: 12/15 24/05/2010
  13. 13. 25 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 255 An Authority provides authorisation associated with any conventions or 256 regulations applicable to the trading of goods within the international purchase 257 and supply chain. The possible roles of an Authority include border control 258 authorities (e.g. Customs), permit/licensing issuing authorities and port 259 authorities etc. 2605.3 Business Entities and Business Rules 261 262 Throughout the international purchase and supply chain various types of 263 information are exchanged. The UNeDocs Data Model provides a cross-domain 264 framework for the derivation of generic documents for the exchange of 265 information between the Customers, Suppliers, Intermediaries and Authorities 266 no matter which countries or modes of transport may be involved. Therefore 267 the UNeDocs data model uses generic terms for the involved parties and for 268 the business information entities contained within it. 269 270 The UNeDocs CCTS Data Modelling includes full referencing between the 271 business information entities and the UNTDED v 2005 (United Trade Data 272 Elements Directory). 273 274 The following diagram and accompanying text describe the relationships 275 between the highest-level Business Information Entities of the CCTS UNeDocs 276 Data Model. Trade. Details Order. Identification. 1 Identifier 1 1..* 1..* 0..* Customs Item. Details (Trade) 1 1..* Trade item. Details 1..* 0..* Trade_ Packaging. Details Customs Item. Identification. Trade Item. Trade_ Packaging. Identifier Identification. Identifier Identification. Identifier 1..* 0..* 1..* 1..* 0..* 1..* 1 1..* 1 Import/Export Declaration. Details Shipment. Details 1 1 1 Declaration Identification. Shipment. Identification. Identifier Identifier 1..* 1 1 1 1..* Consignment Item. Details 1..* 0..* Transport_ Packaging. Details Customs Item. Details (Transport) Customs Item. Identification. Consignment Item. 1..* Transport_ Packaging Identifier Identification. Identifier Identification. Identifier 1..3 1 1..* 0..* 1..* 1 1..* Cargo Report. Details Consignment. Details 1 Consignment. Cargo Report Identification. 1 1..* Identification. Identifier Identifier 1 1..* 0..* 0..* 1..* Transport Equipment. Details Transport Movement. Details Transport Equipment. Transport Movement. Stage. Identification. Identifier 0..* 1 Identifier 1 1..* Transport Means. Details Transport Means. Identification. Identifier 277 279 Figure 6. UNeDocs High-Level Entity Relationships 280 281 Sales Order 282 26Page: 13/15 24/05/2010
  14. 14. 27 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 283 A sales order is a contractual document by means of which a buyer initiates a 284 transaction with a seller involving the supply of goods or services as specified, 285 according to conditions which are either set out in a formal quotation or 286 otherwise known to the buyer. The information included in the UNeDocs cross- 287 border Order document covers both the commercial information between the 288 Buyer and the Seller relating to the Sales Order and also the additional 289 information required by intermediaries and authorities. 290 291 • A Sales Order can only have one Buyer 292 • A Sales Order can only have one Seller 293 • A Sales Order is made up of one or more Trade Items 294 295 Trade Item 296 297 A Trade Item describes the lowest level of "commercial" information in a Sales 298 Order between the Buyer and the Seller. Each Trade Item will usually be 299 associated with a particular product and will include details such as product 300 code, quantity and unit price etc. In the case of cross-border orders each 301 product will also have an associated Customs tariff code. 302 303 • A single Trade Item cannot be split across Shipments 304 • Trade Items are aggregated by Tariff Code/Packaging into Consignment 305 Items 306 307 Shipment 308 309 A shipment is an identifiable collection of one or more Trade Items (available 310 to be) transported together from the Seller (Original Consignor/Shipper), to the 311 Buyer (Final/Ultimate Consignee). 312 313 • A Shipment can only be destined for one Buyer 314 • A Shipment can be made up of some or all Trade Items from one or more 315 Sales Orders 316 • A Shipment can have only one Customs UCR 317 • A shipment may form part or all of a Consignment or may be transported 318 in different Consignments. 319 320 Consignment (Transport Service Order) 321 322 A consignment is a separately identifiable collection of Consignment Items 323 (available to be) transported from one Consignor to one Consignee via one or 324 more modes of transport as specified in one single transport service 325 contractual document. 326 327 • A Consignment can only have one Transport Service Buyer 328 • A Consignment can only have one Transport Service Provider 329 • A Consignment can only have one Consignor 330 • A Consignment can only have one Consignee 331 • The Transport Service Buyer can be either the Consignor or the 332 Consignee 333 • A Consignment is made up of one or more Consignment Items 28Page: 14/15 24/05/2010
  15. 15. 29 TBG2-2006-33-1-UNeDocs BRS 334 • A Consignment can be made up of some or all Trade Items (aggregated 335 into Consignment Items) from one or more Shipments 336 • A Consignment is made up of one or more Customs Items for reporting to 337 Customs 338 • A Consignment can have one or more Customs UCRs 339 340 Consignment Item 341 342 A separately identifiable quantity of products grouped together by Customs 343 tariff code or packaging for transport purposes. A Consignment Item is the 344 lowest level of information within a Consignment. In the case of cross-border 345 consignments each Consignment Item must have only one associated Customs 346 tariff code in order to satisfy Customs requirements. 347 348 • A Consignment Item can contain one or more Trade Items 349 • A Consignment Item can only have one associated Customs tariff code 350 351 Import/Export Customs Declaration 352 353 Documents by which consignments of goods are declared for either export or 354 import Customs clearance, conforming to the layout key set out at Appendix I 355 to Annex C.1 concerning outright exportation to the Kyoto convention (WCO). 356 A Customs tariff code must be provided for each Consignment Item within a 357 consignment. The Customs tariff code, also known as the commodity code, 358 specifies the goods classification under the Harmonised Commodity Description 359 and Coding System of the World Customs Organisation (WCO). 360 361 • An Export or Import Declaration can contain one or more Customs Items 362 • An Export or Import Declaration can have only one UCR 363 364 Customs Item 365 366 A Customs Item is a Consignment Item, a Trade Item or an aggregation of 367 Consignment or Trade Items with distinct Customs tariff code for reporting to 368 Customs. 369 370 • A Customs Item can only have one associated Customs tariff code 371 • A Customs Item can refer to one or more Trade Items 372 • Each reported Consignment may contain one or more separately reported 373 Customs Items 374 375 Customs Cargo Report 376 377 Documents by which movements of goods are reported to Customs at a place 378 of export, import or transit. 379 380 • A Customs Cargo Report reports on one Transport Movement of goods 381 • A Customs Cargo Report reports on one or more Consignments 382 30Page: 15/15 24/05/2010

×