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First and Second Person Subjective Qualitative
Approaches to Achieving Whole Brain Synchrony for
Peak Experience and Peak ...
 Studies are peer reviewed.
 Study outcomes are tested for replicability.
 Random assignments and blinding are used to ...
Why We Require New Approaches to Inquiry
This approach to scientific and scholarly inquiry has
resulted in many remarkable...
3rd Person Emphasis
 In terms of human science research, the standard
paradigm for inquiry emphasizes the 3rd person
pers...
 My Mother Died When I Was 9 Years Old.
 Hospitalized for Stress Burnout.
 Experimented with Holistic Solutions for
Wel...
 Completed Masters Level Studies in
Neuropsychology and Psychophysiology of Stress
Reduction.
 Dear Friend Commits Suici...
Meaning and Point of Catastrophic Bifurcation
This is any place where an event occurs and your life is
never the same afte...
Consequences of “Over-Thinking”
and Complexity
Gregory Bateson (2000, 2002) and Edgar Morin (2008) concluded
that human be...
Ken Wilber’s Four (4) Quadrants of Knowledge
for Stress, Anxiety, Physical Pain and/or Grief
Adapted from Wilber (1996, 19...
 Wilber Quadrant 1 Experience: how you feel in your
body – Bodily Feltsense – interior subjective.
 Example: What is my ...
Quotation
What is heart-breaking about the paradigm-shifting process
is that people tend to believe that the values they h...
Examples of 1st & 2nd Person Methods
 Heuristic Inquiry
 Heuristic Self Search Inquiry [HSSI]
 Dreaming
 Focusing
 In...
Range of Experience:
Global Hyper-Hypo Arousal Model
 According to Fisher (1971, 1973, 1975) and Momen
(1984), all experi...
Ergotropic
Pathway
Tropotropic
Pathway
Hyperarousal
Hyper-
Stimulatory
Levels of
Statebound
Experience
Hypoarousal
Hypo-
S...
Humans were never meant to see the world through a lens of
chronic fear or other negative emotions. We were meant to
exper...
Whole Brain Synchrony
 Parts of brain begin to work together harmoniously.
 Brain resonance occurs when neurons begin to...
Why Whole Brain Synchrony
is a Desired and Sought After State
 Increased Creativity.
 Increased Insight.
 Increased Int...
Whole Brain Synchrony
Viewed as a Way of Paying Attention
 Experience of whole brain synchronization enhances
healthy wel...
NO
Flatlining
NO
Spiking
Fully
Associated
Mental
Clarity
Emotional
Clarity
Euphoria Mild
Delirium
Transpersonal
Transcende...
Elements of Peak Performance
 State where an individual performs to the maximum
of her ability.
 Enhanced levels of self...
Elements of Peak Experience
 Transpersonal and ecstatic state.
 Sense of Unity, Oneness and Awe.
 Sense of interconnect...
Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain Scale
Rate your current state on a scale from “0” to “10”
“0” you feel great, have no pain, h...
Stress Reduction Exercises
 Open Focus Technique.
 Dissolving Pain Technique (DPT).
 Tension Relieving Technique (TRT)....
STILLPOINT
References
American Academy of Pain Medicine. (2014). AAPM facts and
figures on pain. Retrieved from internet May 28, 2014...
Beary, J., & Benson, H. (1974). A simple psychophysiologic
technique which elicits the hypometabolic changes of the
relaxa...
Bentov, I. (1977a, Jan 3rd). Pain may cause lasting
change in neuromachinery. Brain/Mind Bulletin, 2(4),
1-2.
Bentov, I. (...
Benz, D., Cadet, P., Mantione, K., et al. (2002b). Tonal nitric
oxide and health: A free radical and scavenger of free
rad...
Bhattacharje, E. (2013, April 26). The mind of a con man. NY Times.
Retrieved from internet December 1, 2013:
http://www.n...
Braud, W., & Anderson, R. (1998). Transpersonal research methods for
the social sciences: Honoring human experience. Thous...
Cyranoski, D. (2014, April, 1). Stem-cell scientist found guilty of
misconduct. Scientific America. Retrieved from Interne...
Feyerabend, P. (2010). Against method. (4th Ed.). New York,
NY: Verso Books.
Feyerabend, P. (2011). The tyranny of science...
Harris, J. (1998). How the brain talks to itself: A clinical primer of
psychotherapeutic neuroscience. London, UK: The Haw...
Krishnamurti, J. (2007). As one is: To free the mind from all
conditioning. Prescott, AZ: Hohm Press.
Lloyd-Thomas, M. (20...
Medline Plus. (2014). Pain. U.S. National Library of Medicine, NIH.
Retrieved from internet May 29, 2014:
http://www.painm...
Moody, R., & Moody, C. (1991). A family perspective: Helping children
acknowledge and express grief following the death of...
References
National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium. (2014). Retrieved
from internet May 27, 2014: http://painconsort...
References
Ramachandran, V., & Blakeslee, S. (1998). Phantoms in the
brain: Probing the mysteries of the human mind. New Y...
References
Sela-Smith, S. (2003b). Heuristic self search inquiry. Infinite
Connections. Retrieved from
http://www.infinite...
References
Watt, D., Verma, S., & Flynn, L. (1998). Wellness programs: A
review of the literature. Canadian Medical Associ...
References
Wilber, K. (2000). Integral psychology: Consciousness, spirit,
psychology, therapy. Boston, MA: Shambhala Press...
References
Wright, R. (2009). Using transcendental phenomenology for
describing the experience of unresolved grief arising...
First and Second Person Subjective Qualitative
Approaches to Achieving Whole Brain Synchrony
for Peak Experience and Peak ...
Importantly, whole brain synchronization induces a
Relaxation Response that automatically reduces
pain, stress, and anxiet...
Attendees will experience a demonstration of
Open Focus and the Brain Pattern Interrupt
technique as a way of showing expe...
Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT
www.StressFreeNow.info
Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT (TSD, '13) is an
author, speaker, and Stress Management Wellness
Co...
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Consciousness Society: Validation of First and Second Person Methods for Inquiry.

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Consciousness Presentation - May 31, 2014
First and Second Person Subjective Qualitative Approaches to Achieving Whole Brain Synchrony for Peak Experience and Peak Performance

Whole brain synchrony is a well-known and sought after state which has the capacity to beneficially shift consciousness to states of “flow” whereby right and left cerebral hemispheres and prefrontal and brain stem regions work in harmonious union, e.g. brainwave patterns are synchronous or “in phase.”

The benefits of entering whole brain synchronous states are numerous including a sharpening of mental clarity, enhanced ability to problem solve, and resultant measurable subtle increases in creativity, intuition, and insight.

Importantly, whole brain synchronization induces a Relaxation Response that automatically reduces pain, stress, and anxiety in the body through the secretion of helpful homeostatic neurochemicals such as oxytocin,  dopamine, endogenous morphine, and cyclic nitric oxide.

Dr. Wright’s presentation will explore and make a case for the scholarly community to re-consider the historical “normal” science bias against first and second person subjective methods for inquiry especially the requirement that a researcher’s own experience be bracketed out in a quest for “objectivity.”

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Consciousness Society: Validation of First and Second Person Methods for Inquiry.

  1. 1. First and Second Person Subjective Qualitative Approaches to Achieving Whole Brain Synchrony for Peak Experience and Peak Performance with Robert Wright, Jr., PhD, COFT (TSD, '13) Consciousness Society San Francisco, May 31, 2014 www.StressFreeNow.info
  2. 2.  Studies are peer reviewed.  Study outcomes are tested for replicability.  Random assignments and blinding are used to reduce experimenter biases.  Control groups are used as a way to help and correct for data interpretations.  Hypotheses are used to suggest explanations for observed phenomena.  Statistical measures are used to shift data results for reliability and statistically significant correlations in an attempt to validate or invalidate results.  Emphasis on maintaining “objectivity” by measuring from 3rd person perspective. There are many good things about the way scientific and scholarly inquiry is currently conducted using the scientific method paradigm:
  3. 3. Why We Require New Approaches to Inquiry This approach to scientific and scholarly inquiry has resulted in many remarkable discoveries but as quantum science shows, there may not be any truly “objective” approach to inquiry; according to this view, all inquiry is “subjective”. For over half a century, modern neuroscience has been on a reductionist path, breaking things down into ever smaller parts with the hope that understanding all the little pieces will eventually explain the whole. Unfortunately, many people think that because reductionism is so often useful in solving problems, it is therefore also sufficient for solving them, and generations of neuroscientists have been raised on this dogma. This misapplication of reductionism leads to the perverse and tenacious belief that somehow reductionism itself will tell us how the brain works, when what is really needed are attempts to bridge different levels of discourse. ---Ramachandran and Blakeslee, 1998, p. 264
  4. 4. 3rd Person Emphasis  In terms of human science research, the standard paradigm for inquiry emphasizes the 3rd person perspective; regardless of whether the study method is quantitative, mixed, or qualitative [Wilber Quadrant 3].  The 3rd person perspective operates by and emphasizes bracketing out the researcher’s own influence or experience in an attempt to maintain “objectivity” and/or reduce biases.  This necessarily results in a knowledge gap since not all phenomena is measurable as quantifiable data. Moreover, certain types of Statebound experience can only be “known” or witnessed in or at that Statebound level from a 1st or 2nd person perspective, e.g. How do you measure an idea or where ideas come from? How do you measure the source of the mind or where the mind ends or begins? (Fisher, 1971, 1973; Momen, 1984).
  5. 5.  My Mother Died When I Was 9 Years Old.  Hospitalized for Stress Burnout.  Experimented with Holistic Solutions for Wellness.  Stumbled Across Field of Psychoneuroimmunology.  Successfully Used Applied Guided Mental Imagery. My Unexpected Journey to the Land of 1st & 2nd Person Method
  6. 6.  Completed Masters Level Studies in Neuropsychology and Psychophysiology of Stress Reduction.  Dear Friend Commits Suicide Unexpectedly.  Friend’s Death Triggers Motherloss & Existential Grief.  Completed Dissertation Study on Motherloss & Existential Grief Recovery.  Wellness/Stress Reduction Coaching, Author, Speaker. My Unexpected Journey to the Land of 1st & 2nd Person Method
  7. 7. Meaning and Point of Catastrophic Bifurcation This is any place where an event occurs and your life is never the same afterwards, e.g. Anne Marie’s unexpected suicide re-triggers my Motherloss and Existential grief and leads to “clarity” of meaning and direction for my study. Why continue in the doctoral program and do the work entailed to complete a doctoral dissertation if it had no real meaning for me? Combs (2002, p. 51) refers to this type of “liberating” dilemma as a point of catastrophic bifurcation.
  8. 8. Consequences of “Over-Thinking” and Complexity Gregory Bateson (2000, 2002) and Edgar Morin (2008) concluded that human beings have suffered as a result of our over-reliance upon thinking processes. Both Bateson and Morin indicate that thinking, especially over thinking, is a disease which has inflicted much pain and sorrow upon humanity. Bateson (2000, 2002), Krishnamurti (1975, 2007), and Morin (2008) all say that as complexity increases, the need to remove the “disease” of thinking increases. During the film panel discussion, Dr. Leslie Combs intimated that movies which seemed “complex” when first viewed years ago; viewed years later, no longer presented themselves as being “complex”. This may be an example of the mind reordering itself to higher levels of complexity.
  9. 9. Ken Wilber’s Four (4) Quadrants of Knowledge for Stress, Anxiety, Physical Pain and/or Grief Adapted from Wilber (1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004). Upper Left Quadrant 1 Interior - “I” Intentional Subjective Question: What is my experience (feeling) of my stress, anxiety, physical pain and/or grief? Upper Right Quadrant 2 Exterior- “you” (it) – thinking self Behavioral Objective Question: What is the experience (essence) of my stress, anxiety, physical pain and/or grief? Lower Right Quadrant Interior – “We” Intersubjective Cultural Question: What is the experience (essence) of our stress, anxiety, physical pain and/or grief? Lower Right Quadrant Exterior – “Them” (it) Interobjective Social Question: What is the (systemic) experience of societal stress, anxiety, physical pain and/or grief?
  10. 10.  Wilber Quadrant 1 Experience: how you feel in your body – Bodily Feltsense – interior subjective.  Example: What is my experience of my stress? What is my experience of my anxiety? What is my experience of my physical pain? What is my experience of my grief?  Wilber Quadrant 2 Experience: how you describe your feeling – objective thinking self – exterior objective.  Example: What is the experience of my stress? What is the experience of my anxiety? What is the experience of my physical pain? What is the experience of my grief? The Phenomenological Experience “Gap” Missed By 3rd Person Reductionist/Deconstructionist Methods: What does it FEEL like in your body to live the experience, not merely quantify or “describe” the “essence” of the experience? e.g. Bodily Feltsense
  11. 11. Quotation What is heart-breaking about the paradigm-shifting process is that people tend to believe that the values they hear expounded about by the new worldview...can simply be incorporated into the Newtonian worldview. This would be like putting four-dimensional vision into an animal that has only three-dimensional faculties. A paradigm shift is not a matter of fine tuning what we already use, or even seeing it in greater detail. Instead, an entirely new dimension(s) emerges to show us that the world is very different from what we had previously envisioned. --Miller, 1996, p. 31
  12. 12. Examples of 1st & 2nd Person Methods  Heuristic Inquiry  Heuristic Self Search Inquiry [HSSI]  Dreaming  Focusing  Introspection  Lucid Dreaming  Meditation  Phenomenology  Modified Neuropsychological/Psychophysiological HSSI
  13. 13. Range of Experience: Global Hyper-Hypo Arousal Model  According to Fisher (1971, 1973, 1975) and Momen (1984), all experience can be classified as either hyper or hypo Statebound experience. These researchers indicate that there are two (2) directions in which consciousness can be altered.  First, the Ergotropic pathway represents experiences which engender increases in arousal, culminating in the extreme of mystical ecstasy.  Second, the Trophotropic pathway represents experiences where decreased arousal culminates in deep trance.  The next diagram presents a visual comparison of the Ergotropic and the Trophotropic pathways representing aspects of human experience as Statebound knowledge.
  14. 14. Ergotropic Pathway Tropotropic Pathway Hyperarousal Hyper- Stimulatory Levels of Statebound Experience Hypoarousal Hypo- Stimulatory Beta Brainwave State Routine Activity Ordinary Waking Consciousness Beta Brainwave State Hi Beta Brainwave State Excitement Daydreaming/Rel axation Hypnotic Trance Alpha Brainwave State Unknown Brainwave State Anxiety/Mania Hypnopompic/ Hypnogogic Imagery-Twilight State Theta Brainwave State Unknown Brainwave State Mystical Experience Ecstatic Trance Bidirectionality Abreaction Mystical Experience Deep Trance or Samadhi Delta Brainwave State Statebound Experience: Comparison of Ergotropic and Tropotropic Pathways Adapted from Fisher (1971, 1973, 1975); Momen (1984).
  15. 15. Humans were never meant to see the world through a lens of chronic fear or other negative emotions. We were meant to experience the world directly as it is. We were meant to form deep connections to other human beings. With attention training…we can open our hearts to experience the fullness of our senses, and reconnect with forgotten parts of ourselves. We can experience moments of unity and transcendence and find the world has been reenchanted. It will be a watershed moment in human evolution when we are able to pay attention to how we pay attention, control our attention, and take personal responsibility for the creation of our own realities. ---Fehmi and Robbins 2007, p. 8 Quotation
  16. 16. Whole Brain Synchrony  Parts of brain begin to work together harmoniously.  Brain resonance occurs when neurons begin to vibrate at the same frequency.  Neural pathways tend to fire more rapidly.  Brainwave patterns are “in phase” or synchronized.  Also known as “Whole Head Synchrony” or “Whole Brain Functioning” or “Hemispheric Synchronization” or “Whole Brain Synchronization” (Fehmi & Robbins, 2007).
  17. 17. Why Whole Brain Synchrony is a Desired and Sought After State  Increased Creativity.  Increased Insight.  Increased Intuition.  Increased Relaxation Response.  Increased Accelerated Learning Abilities.  Increased Mental Clarity.  Increased Ability to Problem Solve Successfully.  Increased Compassion and Empathy.  Increased Parasympathetic Nervous System Reactivity.
  18. 18. Whole Brain Synchrony Viewed as a Way of Paying Attention  Experience of whole brain synchronization enhances healthy well being.  Open Focus is one way to achieve whole brain synchrony without equipment.  Prolonged and excessive stress can negatively impact almost every aspect of your life.  Maintaining a narrow focused attentional style for long periods often leads to chronic stress and pain, and left unattended to, turns into disease states.  Developing attentional flexibility gives you the capacity to enter a beneficial homeostatic state of whole brain synchronization volitionally.
  19. 19. NO Flatlining NO Spiking Fully Associated Mental Clarity Emotional Clarity Euphoria Mild Delirium Transpersonal Transcendent Experience Sense of Unity Grief/ Mourning/ Bereavement Yes No Yes No No No No No Stress Yes No Yes No No No No No Healing No Yes Yes Yes Yes Possible Possible Possible Dopamine Spike No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Oxytocin Spike No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Serotonin Spike No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Possible Endorphin Spike No Yes Depends Yes Yes Yes Yes Possible Attention: Open Focus Global No Yes Depends Yes Yes Possible Possible Possible Pain Yes No Yes No No No No No Fear/Anxiety Yes No Yes No No No No No Lucid Dream State Unknown Unknown Depends Yes Depends Unknown Unknown Unknown Example of Richness of Data Collection with Modified HSSI Method
  20. 20. Elements of Peak Performance  State where an individual performs to the maximum of her ability.  Enhanced levels of self awareness.  High levels of confidence and focused concentration upon task or goal completion.  Accomplishment is seemingly effortless.  Individual experiences a “flow” state of being “in the zone of excellence.”
  21. 21. Elements of Peak Experience  Transpersonal and ecstatic state.  Sense of Unity, Oneness and Awe.  Sense of interconnectedness.  Time perception may be altered to witness time elongation, time quickening and/or timelessness.  Altered State of Consciousness (ASC).  Therapeutic increases in creativity, compassion for self and others, and personal locus of control (stress reduction).  Self actualization state or individuation (Maslow Level 5).  Personal growth, intrinsic meaning and purpose.
  22. 22. Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain Scale Rate your current state on a scale from “0” to “10” “0” you feel great, have no pain, have no distress “10” you have unbearable pain and are in distress Category Stress Anxiety Physical Pain Mental Clarity Before After
  23. 23. Stress Reduction Exercises  Open Focus Technique.  Dissolving Pain Technique (DPT).  Tension Relieving Technique (TRT).  Brain Pattern Interrupt Technique (BPI).  Brain Plasticity Enhancement Technique [BPET].  Tuning Forks that spike your nitric oxide rhythm: Biosonics Otto 128 and Otto 64.
  24. 24. STILLPOINT
  25. 25. References American Academy of Pain Medicine. (2014). AAPM facts and figures on pain. Retrieved from internet May 28, 2014: http://www.painmed.org/PatientCenter/Facts_on_Pain.as px. Arntz, W., Chasse, B., & Vicente, M. (2007). What the bleep do we know? Discovering the endless possibilities for altering your everyday reality. Deerfield Beach, FL: HCI. Barraza, J., & Zak, P. (2009). Empathy towards strangers triggers oxytocin release and subsequent generosity. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1167, 182– 189. Barraza, J., McCullough, M., & Zak, P. (2011) Oxytocin infusion increases charitable donations regardless of monetary resources. Hormones and Behavior, 60, 148–151. Bateson, G. (2000). Steps to an ecology of mind: Collected essays in anthropology, psychiatry, evolution, and epistemology. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  26. 26. Beary, J., & Benson, H. (1974). A simple psychophysiologic technique which elicits the hypometabolic changes of the relaxation response. Psychsom Med, 36, 115-120. Beaulieu, J. (1987). Music and sound in the healing arts. Barrytown, NY: Stanton Hill Press, Inc. Beaulieu, J. (2005). The rhythm of nitric oxide: How a tiny molecule determines your overall health. Kingston, NY: EnRhythm, LLC. Beaulieu, J. (2010). Human tuning: Sound healing with tuning forks. Stone Ridge, NY: BioSonics Enterprises, Ltd. Benson, H., Beary, J., & Carol, M. (1974). The relaxation response. Psychiatry, 37, 37-46. Benson, H., & Epstein, M. (1975). The placebo effect: A neglected asset in the care of patients. JAMA, 232, 1225- 1226. References
  27. 27. Bentov, I. (1977a, Jan 3rd). Pain may cause lasting change in neuromachinery. Brain/Mind Bulletin, 2(4), 1-2. Bentov, I. (1977b, Feb 21st). Kindling, once epilepsy model, may relate to Kundalini. Brain/Mind Bulletin, 2(7), 4-5. Bentov, I. (1976). Micromotion of the body as a factor in the development of the nervous system. In L. Sanella. Kundalini: Psychosis or transcendence? (p. 71-92). San Francisco, CA: H. S. Dakin Company. Bentz, V., & Shapiro, J. (1998). Mindful inquiry in social research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Benz, D., Cadet, P., Mantione, K., et al. (2002a). Tonal nitric oxide and health: Anti-bacterial and –viral actions and implications for HIV. Med Sci Monitor, 8(1), 27-31. References
  28. 28. Benz, D., Cadet, P., Mantione, K., et al. (2002b). Tonal nitric oxide and health: A free radical and scavenger of free radicals. Med Sci Monit, 8(1), RA1-RA4. Berg, B. (1995). Qualitative research methods for the social sciences. (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Bergaust, L., Van Spanning, R., Frostegard, A., & Bakken, L. (2011). Expression of nitrous oxide reductase in Parracoccus denitrifications is regulated by oxygen and nitric oxide through FnrP and NNR. Microbiology, 158(Pt 3), 826-834. Retrieved from http://mic.sgmjournals.org/content/158/Pt_3/826.full. DOI: 10.1099/mic.0.054148-0. Berridge, K. (2007). The debate over dopamine's role in reward: The case for incentive salience. Psychopharmacology, 191, 391–431. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17072591. References
  29. 29. Bhattacharje, E. (2013, April 26). The mind of a con man. NY Times. Retrieved from internet December 1, 2013: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/magazine/diederik-stapels- audacious-academic-fraud.html?pagewanted%253Dall&_r=0. Bird, B., Newton, F., Sheer, D., & Ford, M. (1978a). Biofeedback training of 40 Hz. EEG in humans. Biofeedback & Self-Regulation, 3(1), 1-12. Bird, B., Newton, F., Sheer, D., & Ford, M. (1978b). Behavioral and electroencephalographic correlates of 40-Hz. EEG biofeedback training in humans. Biofeedback & Self-Regulation, 3(1), 13-28. Blakeslee, S., & Blakeslee, M. (2008). The body has a mind of its own: How body maps in your brain help you do almost everything better. New York, NY: Random House. Blood, A., & Zatorre, R. (2001). Intensely pleasurable responses to music correlate with activity in brain regions implicated in reward and emotion. PNAS, 98(20), 11818-11823. Retrieved from http://www.pnas.org/content/98/20/11818.full.pdf+html. Blood, A., Zatorre, R., Bermudez, P., & Evans, A. (1999). Emotional responses to pleasant and unpleasant music correlate with activity in paralimbic brain regions. Nat. Neurosci., 2, 382-387. References
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  32. 32. Feyerabend, P. (2010). Against method. (4th Ed.). New York, NY: Verso Books. Feyerabend, P. (2011). The tyranny of science. Cambridge, UK: Polity. Finkelstein, H. (1988). The long –term effects of early parental death: A review. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 44, 3-9. Fisher, R. (1971). A cartography of ecstatic and meditative states. Science, 174, 897-904. Fisher, R. (1973). A cartography of the ecstatic and meditative states. Leonardo, 6(1), 59-66. Fisher, R. (1975). Cartography of inner space. In R. K. Siegel & L. J. West. (Eds.). Hallucinations (p. 197-239). New York, NY: Wiley. Harris, B. (2002). Thresholds of the mind: Your personal roadmap to success, happiness, and contentment. Beaverton, OR: Centerpointe Press. References
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  34. 34. Krishnamurti, J. (2007). As one is: To free the mind from all conditioning. Prescott, AZ: Hohm Press. Lloyd-Thomas, M. (2014, March 12). Former postdoc files suit against university. Yale Daily News. Retrieved from internet April 2, 2014: http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2014/03/12/former-postdoc- files-suit-against-university/. Maslow, A. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), 370-96. Maslow, A. (1954). Motivation and personality. New York: Harper. Maslow, A. (1966). The psychology of science. New York, NY: Harper & Row. Maslow, A. (1971). The farther reaches of human nature. New York, NY: Viking. References
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  36. 36. Moody, R., & Moody, C. (1991). A family perspective: Helping children acknowledge and express grief following the death of a parent. Death Studies, 15, 587-602. Morin, E. (2008). On complexity: Advances in systems theory, complexity, and the human sciences. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press. Morledge, T., Allexandre, D., Fox, E., Fu, A., Higashi, M., Kruzikas, D., Pham, S., Pharm, D., & Reese, R. (2013). Feasibility of an online mindfulness program for stress management: A randomized, controlled trial. Ann. Behav. Med. Retrieved from internet January 10, 2013: DOI 10.1007/s12160-013-9490-x. Moustakas, C. (1990). Heuristic research: Design, methodology, and application. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. Moustakas, C. (1994). Phenomenological research methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. National Institutes of Health. (2014). Pain management. Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT). Retrieved from internet May 26, 2014: http://www.report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/ViewFactSheet.aspx?cs id=57. References
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  38. 38. References Ramachandran, V., & Blakeslee, S. (1998). Phantoms in the brain: Probing the mysteries of the human mind. New York, NY: William Morrow. Rando, T. (1993). Treatment of complicated mourning. Champaign, IL: Research Press. Sela-Smith, S. (2002b). Heuristic self search inquiry: Clarification of Moustakas’ heuristic research. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/heuristic-self-search- inquiry-clarification-of-moustakas-heuristic- research/oclc/223575231. Sela-Smith, S. (2003a). Finding the still point: Chapter one. (February). Infinite Connections. Retrieved from http://www.infiniteconnections.us/finding-the-still-point- chapter-one-february-2003#more-233. (Posted on Internet by admin August 29, 2011).
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  40. 40. References Watt, D., Verma, S., & Flynn, L. (1998). Wellness programs: A review of the literature. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 158(2), 224-230. Watzlawick, P., Weakland, J., & Fisch, R. (1974). Change: Principles of problem formation and problem resolution. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company. Webb, N. (1993). Helping bereaved children: A handbook for practitioners. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Wegner, D. (2003). The mind’s best trick: How we experience conscious will. Trends in Cognitive Science, 7, 65-69. Wilber, K. (1996). A brief history of everything. Boston, MA: Shambhala. Wilber, K. (1997). The eye of spirit. Boston, MA: Shambhala.
  41. 41. References Wilber, K. (2000). Integral psychology: Consciousness, spirit, psychology, therapy. Boston, MA: Shambhala Press. Wilber, K. (2002). The spectrum of consciousness. Boston, MA: Shambhala Press. Wright, R. (2006). Lifting the veil on success, high achievement, and what makes winners and champions win: A neuropsychological examination of the underlying mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual correlates which lead to successful peak performance outcomes; elucidation and analysis of the experience of being in the “flow” state or “in the zone” which results in remarkable achievements. (Unpublished Research Paper). Montpelier, VT: Union Institute & University. Wright, R. (2007). Stress related health disparities in African American communities: Can Open Focus provide a modicum of ameliorative stress relief? (Unpublished Master’s Thesis). Montpelier, VT: Union Institute & University.
  42. 42. References Wright, R. (2009). Using transcendental phenomenology for describing the experience of unresolved grief arising out of the death of one’s mother: A pilot study. PowerPoint presentation for Research Paradigms, Methods, and Designs. California Institute of Integral Studies. Wright, R. (2012). The role of endogenous cyclic nitric oxide spiking in Motherloss and Existential grief recovery: A modified neuropsychological and psychophysiological Heuristic Self Search Inquiry approach to stress reduction, homeostasis and healing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest May 30, 2014: http://gradworks.umi.com/35/39/3539752.html Wright, R. (2013). Orgasmic relaxation: Unleash the power of your mind to relax using the Tension Relieving Technique (TRT). Sunrise, FL: Quiet Lake International, LLC. http://www.amazon.com/Orgasmic-Relaxation-Unleash- Relieving-Technique-ebook/dp/B00EBZUN4S
  43. 43. First and Second Person Subjective Qualitative Approaches to Achieving Whole Brain Synchrony for Peak Experience and Peak Performance  Whole brain synchrony is a well-known and sought after state which has the capacity to beneficially shift consciousness to states of “flow” whereby right and left cerebral hemispheres and prefrontal and brain stem regions work in harmonious union, e.g. brainwave patterns are synchronous or “in phase.”  The benefits of entering whole brain synchronous states are numerous including a sharpening of mental clarity, enhanced ability to problem solve, and resultant measurable subtle increases in creativity, intuition, and insight.
  44. 44. Importantly, whole brain synchronization induces a Relaxation Response that automatically reduces pain, stress, and anxiety in the body through the secretion of helpful homeostatic neurochemicals such as oxytocin, dopamine, endogenous morphine, and cyclic nitric oxide. Dr. Wright’s presentation will explore and make a case for the scholarly community to re-consider the historical “normal” science bias against first and second person subjective methods for inquiry especially the requirement that a researcher’s own experience be bracketed out in a quest for “objectivity.”
  45. 45. Attendees will experience a demonstration of Open Focus and the Brain Pattern Interrupt technique as a way of showing experientially how conscious attention can be shifted such that attendees can “know” [ontologically] and feel via bodily feltsense both Wilber Quadrant 1 & 2 phenomena in order to validate the potential rigor of self reporting as researcher(s).
  46. 46. Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT
  47. 47. www.StressFreeNow.info Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT (TSD, '13) is an author, speaker, and Stress Management Wellness Coach. His passionate goal is translating the significance and implications of scholarly stress and nitric oxide spiking research into language and practical techniques which can improve the healthy well-being of the general public. Dr. Wright's most recent eBook is entitled Orgasmic Relaxation: Unleash The Power Of Your Mind To Relax Using The Tension Relieving Technique, and he is the author of the forthcoming book entitled Orgasmic Relaxation: Finding Your Sweet Spot Using The Brain Plasticity Enhancement Technique.
  • KanBen

    Jan. 8, 2017
  • AnnetteKearl

    Aug. 3, 2014

Consciousness Presentation - May 31, 2014 First and Second Person Subjective Qualitative Approaches to Achieving Whole Brain Synchrony for Peak Experience and Peak Performance Whole brain synchrony is a well-known and sought after state which has the capacity to beneficially shift consciousness to states of “flow” whereby right and left cerebral hemispheres and prefrontal and brain stem regions work in harmonious union, e.g. brainwave patterns are synchronous or “in phase.” The benefits of entering whole brain synchronous states are numerous including a sharpening of mental clarity, enhanced ability to problem solve, and resultant measurable subtle increases in creativity, intuition, and insight. Importantly, whole brain synchronization induces a Relaxation Response that automatically reduces pain, stress, and anxiety in the body through the secretion of helpful homeostatic neurochemicals such as oxytocin,  dopamine, endogenous morphine, and cyclic nitric oxide. Dr. Wright’s presentation will explore and make a case for the scholarly community to re-consider the historical “normal” science bias against first and second person subjective methods for inquiry especially the requirement that a researcher’s own experience be bracketed out in a quest for “objectivity.”

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