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Feel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release Experience

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www.StressFreeNow.info

Are you tired? Stressed? Or a little of both? When you come to our stress free event you will leave with less stress and finally get a good night's sleep. Even more you will learn how to become stress free using our simple techniques that you can incorporate into your daily routine.

Come experience an effortless release of your bodily tensions, stress, and anxiety.

Learn how you can regularly give yourself the ultimate gift of self care by relaxing at very deep levels.

This workshop will provide a brief overview of the theory behind the Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain Equation.

You will be guided through a series of practical experiential exercises that can use your creative imagination to re-direct your attention, dissolving your stress, anxiety and physical pain.

You will leave feeling refreshed and renewed, with new attentional skills that can be incorporated into your daily routine.

Published in: Self Improvement
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Feel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release Experience

  1. 1. Feel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release Experience with Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT (TSD, '13) Lecture Sponsored by the CIIS Alumni University Lecture Series, San Francisco, CA May 29, 2014 - 6:30 PM-9:00 PM www.StressFreeNow.info
  2. 2.  Feel Better ImmediatelyFeel Better Immediately  Elevate Your MoodElevate Your Mood  Increase Your MobilityIncrease Your Mobility  Allow You to RelaxAllow You to Relax  Give You a “Mini-Vacation”Give You a “Mini-Vacation” ObjectivesObjectives
  3. 3.  Increase Your EnergyIncrease Your Energy  Increase Your Mental ClarityIncrease Your Mental Clarity  Reduce Your AnxietyReduce Your Anxiety  Reduce Your PainReduce Your Pain  Give You New Attentional SkillsGive You New Attentional Skills ObjectivesObjectives
  4. 4. This is what being Stressed Out Can Look Like!This is what being Stressed Out Can Look Like!
  5. 5.  My Mother Died When I Was 9 Years OldMy Mother Died When I Was 9 Years Old  Hospitalized for Stress BurnoutHospitalized for Stress Burnout  Experimented with Holistic Solutions forExperimented with Holistic Solutions for WellnessWellness  Stumbled Across Field ofStumbled Across Field of PsychoneuroimmunologyPsychoneuroimmunology  Successfully Used Applied Guided MentalSuccessfully Used Applied Guided Mental ImageryImagery My Journey
  6. 6.  Completed Masters Level Studies inCompleted Masters Level Studies in Neuropsychology and Psychophysiology ofNeuropsychology and Psychophysiology of Stress ReductionStress Reduction  Dear Friend Commits Suicide UnexpectedlyDear Friend Commits Suicide Unexpectedly  Friend’s Death Triggers Motherloss andFriend’s Death Triggers Motherloss and Existential GriefExistential Grief  Completed Dissertation Study on MotherlossCompleted Dissertation Study on Motherloss and Existential Grief Recoveryand Existential Grief Recovery  Wellness Coaching, Author, SpeakerWellness Coaching, Author, Speaker My Journey
  7. 7. What is Stress?What is Stress?  Stress is the psychological and/or physiologicalStress is the psychological and/or physiological response to changes in our environment whichresponse to changes in our environment which the mind and/or body perceives as a threat.the mind and/or body perceives as a threat.  Acute Stress is short term or brief.Acute Stress is short term or brief.  Acute Stress can sometimes be useful byAcute Stress can sometimes be useful by helping us achieve goals and/or objectives wehelping us achieve goals and/or objectives we might not pursue voluntarily.might not pursue voluntarily.  Acute Stress can enhance stress hardiness andAcute Stress can enhance stress hardiness and resiliency by improving our ability to handleresiliency by improving our ability to handle adversity; this can provide a boost to ouradversity; this can provide a boost to our immune system while simultaneouslyimmune system while simultaneously enhancing adaptability.enhancing adaptability.
  8. 8. What is Chronic Stress?What is Chronic Stress?  Chronic Stress is debilitating and results inChronic Stress is debilitating and results in repeated and long term activation of stressorsrepeated and long term activation of stressors that trigger the “fight or flight” response.that trigger the “fight or flight” response.  If Chronic Stress is ignored or unattended to, itIf Chronic Stress is ignored or unattended to, it can lead to illness or disease states.can lead to illness or disease states.  Chronic Stress can overwhelm the body’sChronic Stress can overwhelm the body’s defenses and ability to regenerate.defenses and ability to regenerate.  Chronic Stress increases your allostatic load,Chronic Stress increases your allostatic load, impairing your body’s ability to maintainimpairing your body’s ability to maintain allostasis and/or homeostasis.allostasis and/or homeostasis.
  9. 9. What is Anxiety?What is Anxiety?  Anxiety is a state of worry or unease which isAnxiety is a state of worry or unease which is often experienced as a vague and/or unpleasantoften experienced as a vague and/or unpleasant sense of inner turmoil.sense of inner turmoil.  Anxiety can be future oriented, resulting inAnxiety can be future oriented, resulting in uncontrolled worry and/or fear of future events,uncontrolled worry and/or fear of future events, e.g. catastrophizing or blowing events up out ofe.g. catastrophizing or blowing events up out of proportion to reality.proportion to reality.  Anxiety can be relegated to the past, resulting inAnxiety can be relegated to the past, resulting in uncontrolled bouts of rumination where theuncontrolled bouts of rumination where the mind is “stuck” replaying some past event ormind is “stuck” replaying some past event or hurt.hurt.
  10. 10.  Anxiety can present itself as anAnxiety can present itself as an overwhelming sense of doom and gloom.overwhelming sense of doom and gloom.  Anxiety can sometimes be felt as aAnxiety can sometimes be felt as a generalized and/or unfocused fear.generalized and/or unfocused fear.  Anxiety can result in panic attacks when aAnxiety can result in panic attacks when a person becomes overaroused.person becomes overaroused. What Is Anxiety?What Is Anxiety?
  11. 11.  Pain is a signal from the body thatPain is a signal from the body that something is wrong.something is wrong.  Pain signals are transmitted to your brain,Pain signals are transmitted to your brain, producing a physical sensation that lets yourproducing a physical sensation that lets your brain know that damage or injury hasbrain know that damage or injury has occurred.occurred.  Pain can come from physical injury, built upPain can come from physical injury, built up bodily tension, or emotional distress.bodily tension, or emotional distress. What is Pain?What is Pain?
  12. 12.  We are not always aware of the source ofWe are not always aware of the source of our pain caused by emotional distress orour pain caused by emotional distress or muscular tension.muscular tension.  Reducing the stress and tension in yourReducing the stress and tension in your body usually helps your pain subside.body usually helps your pain subside.  Always consult your health care providerAlways consult your health care provider and/or pain management professional in anand/or pain management professional in an attempt to find the source of your pain.attempt to find the source of your pain. What is Pain?What is Pain?
  13. 13. What Is Chronic Pain?What Is Chronic Pain?  Chronic pain is pain which persists, forChronic pain is pain which persists, for weeks, months or years.weeks, months or years.  The sources of some types of chronic painThe sources of some types of chronic pain can be unknown.can be unknown.  Low back pain, neck pain, and migraineLow back pain, neck pain, and migraine headache are the most common forms ofheadache are the most common forms of chronic pain.chronic pain.
  14. 14. • Aches & Pains • Headache • Inability to Control your Temper • Insomnia • Lack of Energy • Loss of Appetite • Low Back Pain • Low Mood • Migraine Headache • Neck Pain • Overeating • Undue Worry Symptoms of Stress, Anxiety and Pain
  15. 15. Sample Conditions Caused BySample Conditions Caused By or Aggravated By Stressor Aggravated By Stress  Anxiety  Asthma  Autoimmune Diseases  Cardiovascular Disease  Chronic Pain  Constipation  Diabetes  Diarrhea  Heartburn  High Blood Pressure  Infertility  Insomnia  Loss of Sex Drive  Obesity  Skin Problems, e.g. Hives or Eczema  Stroke  Substance Abuse  Ulcers  Weight Gain or Weight Loss
  16. 16.  Did you know that according to recent studies and surveys by the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau stress and stress burnout has been called America’s number one health challenge?  Did you know that a 2013 study by the American Institute of Stress revealed that 77% of Americans reported regularly experiencing physical symptoms caused by stress, and 73% reported regularly experiencing psychological symptoms caused by stress?  Did you know that 76% of Americans cited money worries and work as their leading causes of stress, and that almost half of all Americans reported lying awake at night unable to sleep due to stress? Research EvidenceResearch Evidence
  17. 17.  Did you know that a recent American Academy of Family Physicians study concluded that 2 out of 3 of all office visits to family physicians were due to stress-related symptoms?  Did you know that a study in the British Medical Journal concluded that work-related stress can double your risk of dying from heart disease?  Did you know that studies by the American Institute of Stress reported that workplace stress causes approximately one million U.S. employees to miss work each day; this stress costs American businesses over $300 billion every year in lost hours due to absenteeism, reduced productivity, and workers compensation claims? Research EvidenceResearch Evidence
  18. 18. Benefits of Stress ReductionBenefits of Stress Reduction  Dissolve your physical painDissolve your physical pain  Alleviate your levels of anxietyAlleviate your levels of anxiety  Improve your healthImprove your health  Increase your energyIncrease your energy  Enhance mental clarityEnhance mental clarity
  19. 19. Benefits of Stress ReductionBenefits of Stress Reduction  Improve your ability to concentrateImprove your ability to concentrate  Increase your ability to cope with theIncrease your ability to cope with the hassles of everyday livinghassles of everyday living  Increase your ability to stay calm under fireIncrease your ability to stay calm under fire  Spike your nitric oxide rhythm to enhanceSpike your nitric oxide rhythm to enhance well-beingwell-being  Enjoy healthy Relaxation Response benefitsEnjoy healthy Relaxation Response benefits
  20. 20. Important Terms to Know and Understand toImportant Terms to Know and Understand to Enhance Healthy Well-Being & WellnessEnhance Healthy Well-Being & Wellness  Nitric Oxide SpikingNitric Oxide Spiking  Nitric Oxide FlatliningNitric Oxide Flatlining  Endogenous MorphineEndogenous Morphine  DopamineDopamine  SerotoninSerotonin  OxytocinOxytocin  DHEADHEA  GABAGABA
  21. 21. Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain ScaleStress-Anxiety-Physical Pain Scale Rate your current state on a scale from “0” to “10” “0” you feel great, have no pain, have no distress “10” you have unbearable pain and are in distress Category Stress Anxiety Physical Pain Mental Clarity Energy Before After
  22. 22. Stress Reduction ExercisesStress Reduction Exercises  Open Focus TechniqueOpen Focus Technique  Dissolving Pain Technique (DPT)Dissolving Pain Technique (DPT)  Tension Relieving Technique (TRT)Tension Relieving Technique (TRT)  Brain Pattern Interrupt Technique (BPI)Brain Pattern Interrupt Technique (BPI)  Brain Plasticity Enhancement TechniqueBrain Plasticity Enhancement Technique [BPET][BPET]  Tuning Forks that spike your nitric oxideTuning Forks that spike your nitric oxide rhythm: Biosonics Otto 128 and Otto 64rhythm: Biosonics Otto 128 and Otto 64
  23. 23.  Aho, V., Alenius, H., Härmä, M., Jauhiainen, M., Kronholm, E.,Aho, V., Alenius, H., Härmä, M., Jauhiainen, M., Kronholm, E., Lehto, M., Matikainen, S., Ollila, H., Paunio, T., & Porkka-Heiskanen,Lehto, M., Matikainen, S., Ollila, H., Paunio, T., & Porkka-Heiskanen, T. Rantanen, V., Ripatti, S., Sallinen, M., Salomaa, V., Surakka, I.,T. Rantanen, V., Ripatti, S., Sallinen, M., Salomaa, V., Surakka, I., van Leeuwen, W.(2013) Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immunevan Leeuwen, W.(2013) Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immune Response-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental andResponse-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental and Epidemiological Studies in Humans.Epidemiological Studies in Humans. PLoS ONEPLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (10): e77184, 2013; 8 (10): e77184 DOI:DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.007718410.1371/journal.pone.0077184 American Academy of SleepAmerican Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2012, July 1). Sleep deprivation effect on the immuneMedicine. (2012, July 1). Sleep deprivation effect on the immune system mirrors physical stress.system mirrors physical stress. ScienceDailyScienceDaily. Retrieved January 8,. Retrieved January 8, 2014 from2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120701191638.htmwww.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120701191638.htm  Association for Psychological Science. (2007, August 18). LonelinessAssociation for Psychological Science. (2007, August 18). Loneliness is bad for your health.is bad for your health. ScienceDailyScienceDaily. Retrieved March 31, 2014 from. Retrieved March 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070817130107.htmwww.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070817130107.htm..  Benedict C et al. (2013). Acute sleep deprivation increases serumBenedict C et al. (2013). Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium bindinglevels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men.protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men. SLEEPSLEEP, Science Daily,, Science Daily, December, 31, 2013.December, 31, 2013. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131231122123.htmhttp://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131231122123.htm Scholarly References
  24. 24.  Benson, H. (1983). The relaxation response: Its subjective andBenson, H. (1983). The relaxation response: Its subjective and objective historical precedents and physiology.objective historical precedents and physiology. TINS, 6,TINS, 6, 281-284.281-284.  Benson H. (1997). The relaxation response: Therapeutic effect.Benson H. (1997). The relaxation response: Therapeutic effect. Science, 278,Science, 278, 1694–1695. Retrieved from1694–1695. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9411784http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9411784..  Deepak, K. (2005). The role of the autonomic nervous system inDeepak, K. (2005). The role of the autonomic nervous system in rapid breathing practices.rapid breathing practices. Art of Living Foundation.Art of Living Foundation. Retrieved fromRetrieved from http://www.aolresearch.org/other_research.htmlhttp://www.aolresearch.org/other_research.html..  Esch, T., Guarna, M., Bianchi, E., Zhu, W., & Stefano, G. (2004).Esch, T., Guarna, M., Bianchi, E., Zhu, W., & Stefano, G. (2004). Commonalities in the central nervous system’s involvement withCommonalities in the central nervous system’s involvement with complementary medical therapies: Limbic morphinergic processes.complementary medical therapies: Limbic morphinergic processes. Med Sci Monit, 10(6),Med Sci Monit, 10(6), MS6-17. PMID: 15173679.MS6-17. PMID: 15173679. Scholarly References
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  26. 26. Scholarly ReferencesScholarly References  Fleshner, M., & Laudenslager, M. (2004).Fleshner, M., & Laudenslager, M. (2004). Psychoneuroimmunology: Then and now.Psychoneuroimmunology: Then and now. Behav Cogn NeurosciBehav Cogn Neurosci Rev, 3(2),Rev, 3(2), 114-130. Retrieved from114-130. Retrieved from http://www18.homepage.villanova.edu/diego.fernandezduque/Teachinghttp://www18.homepage.villanova.edu/diego.fernandezduque/Teaching DOI: 10.1177/1534582304269027.DOI: 10.1177/1534582304269027.  Foland-Ross, L., Altshuler, L., Bookheimer, S., Lieberman, M.,Foland-Ross, L., Altshuler, L., Bookheimer, S., Lieberman, M., Townsend, J., Penfold, C., Moody, T., Ahlf, K., Shen, J., Madsen,Townsend, J., Penfold, C., Moody, T., Ahlf, K., Shen, J., Madsen, S., Rasser, P., Toga, A., Thompson, P. (2010). AmygdalaS., Rasser, P., Toga, A., Thompson, P. (2010). Amygdala reactivity in healthy adults is correlated with prefrontal corticalreactivity in healthy adults is correlated with prefrontal cortical thickness.thickness. J. Neurosci,J. Neurosci, 30(49), 11673-8.30(49), 11673-8. http://www.semel.ucla.edu/publication/journal-article/foland-ross/2010http://www.semel.ucla.edu/publication/journal-article/foland-ross/2010 . DOI:. DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-5618.2012.01008.x10.1111/j.1399-5618.2012.01008.x  Gagnon, C., Stanos, S., & Atchison, J. (2013). Patient’s perceptionGagnon, C., Stanos, S., & Atchison, J. (2013). Patient’s perception of change following an interdisciplinary pain managementof change following an interdisciplinary pain management program.program. The Journal of PainThe Journal of Pain, 14(4), Suppl., Page S4, DOI:, 14(4), Suppl., Page S4, DOI: 10.1016/j.jpain.2013.01.025)10.1016/j.jpain.2013.01.025)
  27. 27. Scholarly ReferencesScholarly References  Kurina, L., Knutson, K., Hawkley, L., Cacioppo, J., Lauderdale, D.,Kurina, L., Knutson, K., Hawkley, L., Cacioppo, J., Lauderdale, D., Ober, C. (2011). Loneliness is associated with sleep fragmentationOber, C. (2011). Loneliness is associated with sleep fragmentation in a communal society.in a communal society. SleepSleep, 2011; DOI: 10.5665/sleep.1390, 2011; DOI: 10.5665/sleep.1390  Legeron, P. (1993). Behavioral and cognitive strategies in stressLegeron, P. (1993). Behavioral and cognitive strategies in stress management.management. Encephale, 19(1),Encephale, 19(1), 193-202. Retrieved from193-202. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8281901.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8281901.  McEwen, B. (1998a). Protective and damaging effects of stressMcEwen, B. (1998a). Protective and damaging effects of stress mediators.mediators. N Engl J Med, 338,N Engl J Med, 338, 171-179.171-179.  McEwen, B. (1998b). Stress, adaptation, and disease: AllostasisMcEwen, B. (1998b). Stress, adaptation, and disease: Allostasis and allostatic load.and allostatic load. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences,Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 840,840, 33-44.33-44.  McEwen, B. (2000). The neurobiology of stress: From serendipityMcEwen, B. (2000). The neurobiology of stress: From serendipity to clinical relevance.to clinical relevance. Brain Research, 866,Brain Research, 866, 172-189.172-189.
  28. 28. Scholarly ReferencesScholarly References  McEwen, B. (2007). Physiology and neurobiology of stress andMcEwen, B. (2007). Physiology and neurobiology of stress and adaption: Central role of the brain.adaption: Central role of the brain. Physiol Rev, 87,Physiol Rev, 87, 873-904.873-904. Retrieved fromRetrieved from http://physrev.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/87/3/873#BIBL.http://physrev.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/87/3/873#BIBL.  Patel, K., Phelan, E., Leveille, S., Wallace, R., Missikpode, C.,Patel, K., Phelan, E., Leveille, S., Wallace, R., Missikpode, C., Lamb, S., Guralnik, J., Turk, D. (2014). High prevalence of falls,Lamb, S., Guralnik, J., Turk, D. (2014). High prevalence of falls, fear of falls, and impaired balance among older adults with pain infear of falls, and impaired balance among older adults with pain in the United States: Findings from the 2011 national health andthe United States: Findings from the 2011 national health and aging trends study.aging trends study. The Journal of PainThe Journal of Pain, 15(4), Suppl., Page S8,, 15(4), Suppl., Page S8, DOI: 10.1016/j.jpain.2014.01.037.DOI: 10.1016/j.jpain.2014.01.037.  Salamon, E., Esch, T., & Stefano, G. (2006). Pain and relaxation:Salamon, E., Esch, T., & Stefano, G. (2006). Pain and relaxation: A review.A review. Int J Mol Med,Int J Mol Med, 18(3), 465-470. Retrieved from18(3), 465-470. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16865231.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16865231.
  29. 29. Scholarly ReferencesScholarly References  Salamon, E., Kim, M., Beaulieu, J., & Stefano, G. (2003). SoundSalamon, E., Kim, M., Beaulieu, J., & Stefano, G. (2003). Sound therapy induced relaxation: Down regulating stress processes andtherapy induced relaxation: Down regulating stress processes and pathologies.pathologies. Med Sci Monit, 9(5),Med Sci Monit, 9(5), RA116-RA121. Retrieved fromRA116-RA121. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12761468.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12761468.  Sterling, P., & Eyer, J. (1988).Sterling, P., & Eyer, J. (1988). Allostasis: A new paradigm toAllostasis: A new paradigm to explain arousalexplain arousal pathology.pathology. In S. Fisher, & J. Reason. (Eds.).In S. Fisher, & J. Reason. (Eds.). Handbook of life stress, cognition and healthHandbook of life stress, cognition and health (p. 629-649). New(p. 629-649). New York, NY: Wiley.York, NY: Wiley.  University of Chicago Department of Psychology. (2013).University of Chicago Department of Psychology. (2013). ChicagoChicago health aging and social relations study (CHASRS).health aging and social relations study (CHASRS). http://psychology.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/cacioppo/CHASRS.shtmlhttp://psychology.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/cacioppo/CHASRS.shtml
  30. 30. Scholarly ReferencesScholarly References  University of Helsinki. (2013, October 23). New links between sleepUniversity of Helsinki. (2013, October 23). New links between sleep deprivation, immune system discovered.deprivation, immune system discovered. ScienceDailyScienceDaily. Retrieved April. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023183908.htm.www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023183908.htm.  Weitzberg, E., & Lundberg, J. (2002). Humming greatly increasesWeitzberg, E., & Lundberg, J. (2002). Humming greatly increases nasal nitric oxide.nasal nitric oxide. Am J Respir Crit Care Med, 166,Am J Respir Crit Care Med, 166, 144-145.144-145. Retrieved fromRetrieved from http://ajccm.atsjournals.org/content/166/2/144.pdf+html. DOI:http://ajccm.atsjournals.org/content/166/2/144.pdf+html. DOI: 10.1164/rccm.200202-138BC.10.1164/rccm.200202-138BC.  Wright, R. (2012).Wright, R. (2012). The role of endogenous cyclic nitric oxide spikingThe role of endogenous cyclic nitric oxide spiking in Motherloss and Existential grief recovery: A modified Heuristic Selfin Motherloss and Existential grief recovery: A modified Heuristic Self Search Inquiry approach to stress reduction, homeostasis, andSearch Inquiry approach to stress reduction, homeostasis, and healinghealing. California Institute of Integral Studies, ProQuest Dissertation. California Institute of Integral Studies, ProQuest Dissertation 3539752.3539752. http://gradworks.umi.com/35/39/3539752.htmlhttp://gradworks.umi.com/35/39/3539752.html
  31. 31. Popular ReferencesPopular References  Bacci, I. (2005).Bacci, I. (2005). Effortless pain relief: A guide for self healingEffortless pain relief: A guide for self healing from chronic pain.from chronic pain. New York, NY: Bantam Books.New York, NY: Bantam Books.  Beaulieu, J. (2005).Beaulieu, J. (2005). The rhythm of nitric oxide: How a tinyThe rhythm of nitric oxide: How a tiny molecule determines your overall health.molecule determines your overall health. Kingston, NY:Kingston, NY: EnRhythm, LLC.EnRhythm, LLC.  Beaulieu, J. (2010).Beaulieu, J. (2010). Human tuning: Sound healing with tuningHuman tuning: Sound healing with tuning forks.forks. Stone Ridge, NY: BioSonics Enterprises, Ltd.Stone Ridge, NY: BioSonics Enterprises, Ltd.  Benson, H. (2005). Different voice: Are you working too hard? ABenson, H. (2005). Different voice: Are you working too hard? A conversation with mind/body researcher Herbert Benson.conversation with mind/body researcher Herbert Benson. HarvardHarvard Business Review, (Nov.). Retrieved fromBusiness Review, (Nov.). Retrieved from http://www.getinsidehealth.com/PageFiles/490/Are%20youhttp://www.getinsidehealth.com/PageFiles/490/Are%20you %20working%20too%20hardR0511Bf2.pdf?epslanguage=en.%20working%20too%20hardR0511Bf2.pdf?epslanguage=en.  Benson, H., & Proctor, W. (2011).Benson, H., & Proctor, W. (2011). Relaxation revolution: TheRelaxation revolution: The science and genetics of mind body healingscience and genetics of mind body healing. New York, NY:. New York, NY: Scribner.Scribner.
  32. 32. Popular ReferencesPopular References  Fehmi, L., & Robbins, J. (2007).Fehmi, L., & Robbins, J. (2007). The open focus brain:The open focus brain: Harnessing the power of attention to heal mind and body.Harnessing the power of attention to heal mind and body. Boston, MA: Trumpeter.Boston, MA: Trumpeter.  Fehmi, L., & Robbins, J. (2010).Fehmi, L., & Robbins, J. (2010). Dissolving pain: SimpleDissolving pain: Simple brain-training exercises for overcoming chronic pain.brain-training exercises for overcoming chronic pain. (Includes Dissolving Pain CD). Boston, MA: Trumpeter.(Includes Dissolving Pain CD). Boston, MA: Trumpeter.  Northrup, C. (2008).Northrup, C. (2008). The secret pleasures of menopause.The secret pleasures of menopause. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, Inc.Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, Inc.  Reuters. (2014). Yoga may help reduce blood pressure, butReuters. (2014). Yoga may help reduce blood pressure, but further research needed.further research needed. Fox NewsFox News, May 12, 2014., May 12, 2014. http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/05/12/yoga-may-help-redhttp://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/05/12/yoga-may-help-red
  33. 33. Popular ReferencesPopular References  Seligman, M. (1998).Seligman, M. (1998). Learned optimism: How to changeLearned optimism: How to change your mind and your life.your mind and your life. New York, NY: Pocket Books.New York, NY: Pocket Books.  Stress Hardiness: Stress Management Health CourseStress Hardiness: Stress Management Health Course.. (2011).(2011). http://stresscourse.tripod.com/d106.htmhttp://stresscourse.tripod.com/d106.htm  Taub, M., Murad, F., & Oliphant, D. (2006).Taub, M., Murad, F., & Oliphant, D. (2006). The wellnessThe wellness solution.solution. Cleveland, OH: World Almanac Library.Cleveland, OH: World Almanac Library.  Taylor, J. (2008).Taylor, J. (2008). My stroke of insight: A brain scientist’sMy stroke of insight: A brain scientist’s personal journey.personal journey. New York, NY: Viking.New York, NY: Viking.  Weil, A. (1999).Weil, A. (1999). Breathing: The master key to self healing.Breathing: The master key to self healing. The Self Healing Series.The Self Healing Series. [CD]. Louisville, CO: Sounds True,[CD]. Louisville, CO: Sounds True, Inc.Inc.
  34. 34. Popular ReferencesPopular References  Weil, A. (2000).Weil, A. (2000). Spontaneous healing: How to discover andSpontaneous healing: How to discover and embrace your body’s natural ability to maintain and heal itself.embrace your body’s natural ability to maintain and heal itself. New York, NY: Ballentine Books.New York, NY: Ballentine Books.  Weil, A. (2004).Weil, A. (2004). Natural health, natural medicine: The completeNatural health, natural medicine: The complete guide to wellness and self-care for optimum health.guide to wellness and self-care for optimum health. (Rev. ed.).(Rev. ed.). New York, NY: Mariner Books.New York, NY: Mariner Books.  Weil, A. (2007).Weil, A. (2007). Healthy again: A lifelong guide to your well-Healthy again: A lifelong guide to your well- being.being. (1st ed.). Harpswell, ME: Anchor.(1st ed.). Harpswell, ME: Anchor.  Whals, Terry. (2014). Did you know that disease loves stress?Whals, Terry. (2014). Did you know that disease loves stress? Healthy Holistic Living.comHealthy Holistic Living.com http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/disease-loves-stress.htmlhttp://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/disease-loves-stress.html  Wright, R. (2013). Orgasmic relaxation: Unleash the power ofWright, R. (2013). Orgasmic relaxation: Unleash the power of your mind to relax using the tension relieving technique (TRT).your mind to relax using the tension relieving technique (TRT). Sunrise, FL: Quiet Lake International, LLC.Sunrise, FL: Quiet Lake International, LLC.
  35. 35. Feel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release ExperienceFeel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release Experience Lecture sponsored by the Alumni University Lecture SeriesLecture sponsored by the Alumni University Lecture Series The ability to relax deeply at will is a highly desired stateThe ability to relax deeply at will is a highly desired state of well-being with many health benefits includingof well-being with many health benefits including reduced levels of stress, anxiety and physical pain.reduced levels of stress, anxiety and physical pain. Come experience an effortless release of your bodilyCome experience an effortless release of your bodily tensions, stress, and anxiety, and learn how you cantensions, stress, and anxiety, and learn how you can regularly give yourself the ultimate gift of self-care byregularly give yourself the ultimate gift of self-care by relaxing at very deep levels.relaxing at very deep levels. Being deeply relaxed helps you to hit your “sweet spot”Being deeply relaxed helps you to hit your “sweet spot” where you feel euphoric, centered, and blissfully joyful.where you feel euphoric, centered, and blissfully joyful.
  36. 36. Feel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release ExperienceFeel Better Now: A Peak Stress Release Experience Lecture sponsored by the Alumni University Lecture SeriesLecture sponsored by the Alumni University Lecture Series This workshop provides a brief overview of the theoryThis workshop provides a brief overview of the theory behind the Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain equation as wellbehind the Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain equation as well as a Scale and Checklist of questions to assess and rateas a Scale and Checklist of questions to assess and rate your current levels of stress, anxiety, and physical pain.your current levels of stress, anxiety, and physical pain. You will be guided through a series of practicalYou will be guided through a series of practical experiential exercises that use your creative imaginationexperiential exercises that use your creative imagination to re-direct your attention, dissolving your stress,to re-direct your attention, dissolving your stress, anxiety and physical pain.anxiety and physical pain. You will leave feeling refreshed and renewed, with newYou will leave feeling refreshed and renewed, with new attentional skills that can be incorporated into your dailyattentional skills that can be incorporated into your daily routine.routine.
  37. 37. Robert Wright, Jr. Ph.D., COFTRobert Wright, Jr. Ph.D., COFT Robert Wright Jr. Ph.D.,Robert Wright Jr. Ph.D., COFT has written books onCOFT has written books on stress and his websitestress and his website http://stressfreenow.infohttp://stressfreenow.info has loads of informationhas loads of information about how to relieve theabout how to relieve the stresses of every day lifestresses of every day life and make you happier inand make you happier in just a short few days. Joinjust a short few days. Join his newsletter to live ahis newsletter to live a stress free life so you canstress free life so you can live longer and play withlive longer and play with your grandchildren.your grandchildren. www.StressFreeNow.infowww.StressFreeNow.info

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