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Introducing NASA's Top 10 Contractors
1. California Institute of Technology
Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.
Image source: Wikimedia Comm...
2. Lockheed Martin Corporation
Lockheed’s Delta IV rocket: Image source: Wikimedia Commons.
Lockheed Martin moves
up one s...
3. The Boeing Company
Boeing’s Atlas V is currently NASA’s second biggest rocket.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons.
With “o...
4. Orbital ATK
OA-4 Service Module. Image source: Orbital ATK.
A new entry on NASA’s
top-10 contractors list
this year -- ...
5. Jacobs Engineering Group
Jacobs Engineering supports operations at Johnson Space
Center. Image source: Wikimedia Common...
6. Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX)
SpaceX wants to help NASA hop into the future with reusable rockets
such as “Gr...
7. Raytheon Company
Raytheon built the infrared sensors for NASA’s NPP Suomi
weather satellite. Image source: Wikimedia Co...
8. Northrop Grumman Corporation
NASA uses Northrop’s Global Hawk to monitor hurricane formation.
Image source Northrop Gru...
9. United Launch Alliance
United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at liftoff.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons.
Formed to fac...
10. Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies (SGT Inc.)
SGT helps NASA monitor the polar ice sheets with ICESat.
Image source: Wiki...
So why is all this important?
Boeing and Lockheed Martin are two of America’s
top three space contractors, and the only tw...
But it’s more than just that.
As the joint owners of United Launch Alliance, NASA’s
No. 9 contractor, Boeing and Lockheed ...
Voila!
All of a sudden, Boeing’s NASA revenue leaps to
$1.62 billion, and Lockheed’s goes to $1.87 billion.
Boeing’s grip ...
As for everybody else…
But if you want to place a big bet on the future of
space exploration, and are looking for the best...
The answer:
Put a bit of money into Boeing…
and a bit more into Lockheed Martin.
With any luck at all, both stocks will ta...
The next billion-dollar iSecret
The world's biggest tech company forgot to show you something at its recent event, but a
f...
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Introducing NASA's Top 10 Contractors

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Just 10 companies account for more than 54% of the money NASA spends in a year. Who are they, what do they do, and how much do they make? In this slideshare, we tell all.

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Introducing NASA's Top 10 Contractors

  1. 1. Introducing NASA's Top 10 Contractors
  2. 2. 1. California Institute of Technology Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Image source: Wikimedia Commons. CalTech keeps its title as NASA’s No. 1 favorite contractor for the second year running. CalTech took in $1.71 billion from NASA in fiscal year 2014 – 11.4% of all funds NASA spent on outside contractors.
  3. 3. 2. Lockheed Martin Corporation Lockheed’s Delta IV rocket: Image source: Wikimedia Commons. Lockheed Martin moves up one spot to No. 2 for FY 2014, taking home 11.3% of NASA’s contracts by dollar value. LockMart won $1.69 billion in NASA work -- more than 20% of all revenue recorded by the company’s space systems division.
  4. 4. 3. The Boeing Company Boeing’s Atlas V is currently NASA’s second biggest rocket. Image source: Wikimedia Commons. With “only” $1.43 billion in 2014 funding, Boeing drops to No. 3 on NASA’s contractors list. Among publicly traded companies, that still leaves Boeing as NASA’s second-biggest beneficiary, taking home 9.6% of funds awarded.
  5. 5. 4. Orbital ATK OA-4 Service Module. Image source: Orbital ATK. A new entry on NASA’s top-10 contractors list this year -- displacing Russia’s Roskosmos -- Orbital Sciences received $666 million from NASA in FY 2014, or 4.4% of total funds awarded.
  6. 6. 5. Jacobs Engineering Group Jacobs Engineering supports operations at Johnson Space Center. Image source: Wikimedia Commons. Something less than a household name, Jacobs Engineering was still NASA’s fifth-biggest beneficiary. Jacobs’ entire market capitalization is only $5.4 billion, and yet it took home $617 million worth of NASA funding.
  7. 7. 6. Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) SpaceX wants to help NASA hop into the future with reusable rockets such as “Grasshopper.” Image source: Wikimedia Commons. As NASA’s No. 6 contractor, SpaceX remains the largest privately owned company receiving NASA funds. Elon Musk’s space exploration company won 3.2% of NASA contracts in 2014, amounting to $483 million.
  8. 8. 7. Raytheon Company Raytheon built the infrared sensors for NASA’s NPP Suomi weather satellite. Image source: Wikimedia Commons. As America’s premier “rocket” company, Raytheon is a natural inclusion on NASA’s list. Raytheon took home nearly 2.9% of NASA work last year, totaling $432 million.
  9. 9. 8. Northrop Grumman Corporation NASA uses Northrop’s Global Hawk to monitor hurricane formation. Image source Northrop Grumman. NASA is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Northrop’s Global Hawks help with the first half of that mission, and Northrop is well paid for the work. NASA paid Northrop $417 million for drones and other work in FY 2014, a 12% increase over 2013 funding and 2.8% of NASA’s outlays.
  10. 10. 9. United Launch Alliance United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at liftoff. Image source: Wikimedia Commons. Formed to facilitate space launches for NASA and the U.S. Air Force, ULA has historically held a near- monopoly on such work, and been paid handsomely for it -- $365 million in 2014. In 2015, that monopoly was revoked. Next year might not be as lucrative for ULA.
  11. 11. 10. Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies (SGT Inc.) SGT helps NASA monitor the polar ice sheets with ICESat. Image source: Wikimedia Commons. Privately held SGT doesn’t get as much press as privately held SpaceX. But that’s OK, as long as the checks clear. NASA’s No. 10 contractor won $328 million in NASA work in 2014.
  12. 12. So why is all this important? Boeing and Lockheed Martin are two of America’s top three space contractors, and the only two of the three that are publicly traded companies. Every time NASA spends $1, Boeing and Lockheed Martin collect about $0.21 right off the top.
  13. 13. But it’s more than just that. As the joint owners of United Launch Alliance, NASA’s No. 9 contractor, Boeing and Lockheed Martin also split ULA’s revenues 50-50. In other words, of the $365 million that ULA made from NASA last year, $182.5 million of that went to Boeing, and the other half went to LockMart.
  14. 14. Voila! All of a sudden, Boeing’s NASA revenue leaps to $1.62 billion, and Lockheed’s goes to $1.87 billion. Boeing’s grip on the No. 3 slot gets a little firmer… and Lockheed Martin catapults into first place!
  15. 15. As for everybody else… But if you want to place a big bet on the future of space exploration, and are looking for the best way to do that, the choice is clear. Now as for Jacobs Engineering, Orbital ATK, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, and SpaceX? They’re fine companies, one and all, and big beneficiaries of NASA largesse.
  16. 16. The answer: Put a bit of money into Boeing… and a bit more into Lockheed Martin. With any luck at all, both stocks will take off. Delta IV Heavy launch. Image source: Wikimedia Commons.
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