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TILC 2017 Program

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Program for The Innovative Library Classroom 2016 held at Radford University on May 10-11, 2017.

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TILC 2017 Program

  1. 1. TILC 2017 Schedule at a Glance Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:00 to 8:00 pm Preconference Social and Poster Session College of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) Radford University Poster Sessions 6:15 – 7:15 pm Natalie L. Browning | Longwood University “But I Can’t Go to the Library:” Embedding Librarians in Online Courses Jennie Goforth & Kodi Saylor | University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill One-On-One Research Help: Designing Services that Support Enduring Relationships with First-Year Students Alex Harrington & Garrison Libby | Tidewater Community College Treasure Hunts at the Library: Raiders of the Lost (AR)k Joi Jackson | George Mason University Beyond the CRAAP Test: New Tools for Source Evaluation Bernadette Miro & Mason Yang | Marymount University Meeting Your Student Where They Are: Making the Most of Your School’s LMS Gina O. Petrie | Catawba College The Game Is Afoot: Information Literacy for First-Year Students Krista Schmidt | Western Carolina University Talking Through It: Using Student-to-Student Interviews and Brainstorming Activities for Facilitating Critical Inquiry Alexandra Voorhees | Roanoke College Using a Liberal Arts Experiential Learning Process to Teach Library Research
  2. 2. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Thursday, May 11, 2017 CHBS 1016 CHBS 3016 CHBS 3020 9:00 – 9:15 am Opening Remarks 9:15 – 10:00 am Keynote: Rebecca K. Miller Penn State University Teaching, Learning, and Leading: Be a Professional Triple Threat 10:10 – 11:00 am Kristin E. C. Green Penn State University – Worthington Scranton Dust off those Encyclopedias: Using Reference Sources to Teach the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Denise A. Wetzel & Justin Kani Mississippi State University Innovating the FYE Proposal: Moving Beyond “Library Week” Kristen Mastel University of Minnesota Integrating Mindfulness Approaches while Tackling Social Justice in the Classroom 11:10 am – 12:00 pm Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra Grand Valley State University Maximizing “Down Time”: Innovative Strategies to Build Student Engagement before the Start of Class Paula S. Kiser Mary Baldwin University Ready for the Next Step: Combining Information Literacy with Digital Literacy Instruction in e- Portfolio Creation Katelyn Tucker Burton, Alyssa Archer, & Michele Ren Virginia Western Community College & Radford University A Single Shot of Critical Pedagogy: Lessons Learned & Best Practices 12:00 – 1:10 pm Lunch 1:10 – 2:00 pm Sam Winn, Crasha Townsend, & Craig Arthur Virginia Tech & Radford University WILC: Whiteness in Library Classrooms Cara Barker & Elizabeth Marcus Western Carolina University It’s How You Play the Game: Utilizing an Online Quiz Tool to Enhance and Assess your Library’s Instruction Program Candice Benjes-Small & Jennifer Resor-Whicker Radford University Urban Legend or Practical Pedagogy: Are you a Teaching Ninja? 2:10 – 3:00 pm Jenny Dale & Lynda Kellam UNC – Greensboro Beyond Popular vs. Scholarly: Teaching Outside the Peer-Reviewed Checkbox Jen Hasse Cabrini University Building a Bridge: Using a Metaphor to Teach Information Literacy Fun Denise Woetzel, Joshua Watson, & Suzanne Sherry J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Library Live! Collaborating Towards Heightened Information Literacy & Retention in English Composition Classes 3:00 – 3:20 pm Afternoon Break 3:20 – 4:00 pm Lightning Talks 4:00 – 4:15 pm Closing Remarks
  3. 3. 3 #TILC2017 Keynote | Thursday, May 11, 2017, 9:15 am, CHBS 1016 Teaching, Learning and Leading: Be a Professional Triple Threat Rebecca K. Miller | Pennsylvania State University As libraries evolve their services and organizational structures to meet new campus needs and priorities, they need strong, empathetic leaders who understand how to communicate effectively, facilitate discussions, generate buy-in, and evaluate progress. These are the same skills and traits on which instruction librarians rely every day to manage classrooms, collaborate with disciplinary faculty, design learning experiences, and assess student learning. Because of this, instruction librarians are well-positioned and uniquely qualified to step into transformative leadership roles. This keynote will explore these transformative leadership roles through the lens of pedagogy and inspire participants to identify ways to embrace their triple threat professional identities! Rebecca K. Miller is the Head of Library Learning Services at Penn State University Libraries, a role where she manages a department of around ten instruction-focused colleagues at the University Park campus and coordinates an instruction program including 34 distinct teaching units throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining Penn State in 2015, Rebecca worked at Virginia Tech and Louisiana State University in roles that enabled her to discover her passion for teaching, learning, and information literacy. Rebecca recently co-authored a book with Candice Benjes-Small that is aimed toward instruction librarians and their supervisors titled The new instruction librarian: A workbook for trainers and learners. She also recently co-authored an ARL Spec Kit on evolving roles for library liaisons and a number of articles on strategically building and evolving library instruction, engagement, and outreach programs. She also recently joined the ACRL Immersion Program as a faculty member and is looking forward to helping the faculty revise the Immersion curriculum and to teaching in her first Immersion program this summer in Vermont! Rebecca has a bachelor’s degree from the College of William & Mary in Virginia, an MSLS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and an MA in Instructional Design and Technology from Virginia Tech. When not thinking about libraries and information literacy, she likes to support the librarian stereotype by snuggling with her two cats, Pip and Fox, and reading.
  4. 4. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Presentations | Thursday, May 11, 2017, College of Humanities & Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) Thursday, May 11, 2017, 10:10 – 11:00 am CHBS 1016 Dust off those Encyclopedias: Using Reference Sources to Teach the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Kristin E. C. Green | Pennsylvania State University – Worthington Scranton What if the ideal tools for teaching undergraduate students the most critical information literacy concepts have been sitting in the stacks all along collecting dust, or wading out in digital space unencountered? Reference sources are an optimal medium to introduce all six of the ACRL Framework’s central concepts for information literacy. Additionally, by understanding a reference source’s place in the information search process, students learn to consciously avoid the common pitfall of neglecting exploratory research before specifying their research topics. Thus, incorporating reference sources thoughtfully into instructional design contributes to the development of both information literacy and metacognition. Thursday, May 11, 2017, 10:10 – 11:00 am CHBS 3016 Innovating the FYE Proposal: Moving Beyond “Library Week” Denise A. Wetzel & Justin Kani | Mississippi State University How can libraries and librarians expand out from a First-Year Experience (FYE) “library week” to an entire library-focused course? By proposing and conducting an innovative library-centric FYE course, of course! FYE Programs are a hot topic in academia right now, but many academic libraries are relegated to “library week” status. This program seeks to explain the process for proposing a FYE class by academic libraries and librarians. Our library took the general FYE program and transformed it into a library-centric FYE experience for incoming freshmen. The program will delve into topics, including, but not limited to: FYE topic consideration, the FYE proposal process, FYE syllabus creation, integrating the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education into your FYE, advocating for the FYE, and getting ready for your first FYE course.
  5. 5. 5 #TILC2017 Thursday, May 11, 2017, 10:10 – 11:00 am CHBS 3020 Integrating Mindfulness Approaches while Tackling Social Justice in the Classroom Kristen Mastel | University of Minnesota The past election cycle brought up many feelings of division and intolerance. Following this divisive election, mindfulness approaches can help our students and colleagues develop positive strategies for difficult conversations and work together toward a campus climate of inclusion. Contemplative pedagogy can help us discuss power inequities, echo chambers, and other topics related to all fields that are embedded in the ACRL Framework. This workshop will allow time to experience mindfulness-based activities based on the work of Dr. Rhonda Magee and Jon Kabat-Zinn, including: emotional regulation through self- compassion, image inquiry, mindful journaling, and active listening to understand one’s feelings and emotions. Participants will work with their own lesson plan to incorporate an element of contemplative pedagogy in order to create an inclusion classroom. Presentations | Thursday, May 11, 2017, College of Humanities & Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) Thursday, May 11, 2017, 11:10 am – 12:00 pm CHBS 1016 Maximizing “Down Time”: Innovative Strategies to Build Student Engagement Before the Start of Class Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra | Grand Valley State University It’s ten minutes before the start of your instruction session, the students are trickling in and you are... fiddling with the computer? Shuffling papers? Making small talk with the professor? Take advantage of this time to build student engagement. Long-known to K-12 educators as “bellwork,” learn how to enhance your instruction by developing activities that spark student interest before the start of a session. This presentation will detail and demonstrate innovative strategies to activate prior knowledge, facilitate self-assessment, and build rapport. Attendees will participate in example activities and build a collection of ideas to help them make the most out of every minute with their students.
  6. 6. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Thursday, May 11, 2017, 11:10 am – 12:00 pm CHBS 3016 Ready for the Next Step: Combining Information Literacy with Digital Literacy Instruction in e-Portfolio Creation Paula S. Kiser | Mary Baldwin University The communication & marketing department at my university recently began requiring seniors in the major to create an e-portfolio as part of their senior project but wasn’t sure where to start. The professor in charge of the research class approached the library with interest in embedding a librarian in the class to teach both research skills for their final projects and digital content creation skills in developing their e-portfolios. After reviewing the literature on best practices, examples of communication e-portfolios, and various grading rubrics, we worked together to develop the assignment. The professor discussed content students would include while the librarian taught students personal website creation using WordPress, class-sourced best practices with assistance from professional guest speakers, and required students to find and use professional examples as templates for their own e-portfolios. Students learned about writing for the web, using WSYWIG editors, and taking control of their professional digital identities. Thursday, May 11, 2017, 11:10 am – 12:00 pm CHBS 3020 A Single Shot of Critical Pedagogy: Lessons Learned & Best Practices Katelyn Tucker Burton | Virginia Western Community College Alyssa Archer & Michele Ren | Radford University Much conversation has taken place about critical pedagogy concepts, but few applications that are practical to the most common library instruction condition – the always contentious one-shot session – have been discussed in the literature. In this hands-on workshop, librarians from a community college and a public university will share their experiences integrating critical pedagogy concepts into one-shot instruction sessions. We will also be joined by one of our favorite non-librarian teaching faculty partners, who will share her perspective on partnering for information literacy instruction. Participants will learn how critical pedagogy ties in with multiple lenses of the Framework and will design active learning exercises to incorporate these concepts into their praxis with their own teaching and learning partners.
  7. 7. 7 #TILC2017 Presentations | Thursday, May 11, 2017, College of Humanities & Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) Thursday, May 11, 2017, 1:10 – 2:00 pm CHBS 1016 WILC: Whiteness in Library Classrooms Sam Winn | Virginia Tech Crasha Townsend | Radford University Craig Arthur | Virginia Tech Librarianship is an oppressively homogeneous field. According to the latest American Library Association data, approximately 88% of credentialed librarians are white. Furthermore, 73% are white women. As Bourg, Espinal, Galvan, Hall, Hathcock, and Vinopal have demonstrated, even well-intentioned initiatives to diversify librarianship often operate from a position of white normativity. Although the ALA Code of Ethics challenges librarians to provide equitable and unbiased service to all, critical discussions of whiteness have only recently begun to enter library and information science literature. Join a librarian from a large public university, a public university archivist, and the director of a public university’s center for diversity and inclusion as we explore theoretical and practical understandings of whiteness and its impact on learning environments. Presenters and participants will collectively discuss our lived experiences with race and share actionable tactics to combat white normativity in the classroom. Thursday, May 11, 2017, 1:10 – 2:00 pm CHBS 3016 It’s How You Play the Game: Utilizing an Online Quiz Tool to Enhance and Assess Your Library’s Instruction Program Cara Barker & Elizabeth Marcus | Western Carolina University Two instruction librarians began experimenting with the web-based quiz platform, Kahoot!, to use in general education classes as icebreakers, discussion starters, and for summative assessment. The success of this experimentation and the perceived possibilities for utilizing this tool led us to develop a repository of pre-made Kahoot! quizzes that all of our instruction librarians could utilize for a variety of class scenarios. In this session we will describe the evolution of our use of Kahoot!, the development of the quiz repository, and how we utilize it to engage with students. We’ll discuss how the platform can be utilized for a variety of assessment needs and how our instruction librarians are using the assessment to inform the evolving learning outcomes for introductory composition courses.
  8. 8. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Thursday, May 11, 2017, 1:10 – 2:00 pm CHBS 3020 Urban Legend or Practical Pedagogy: Are You a Teaching Ninja? Candice Benjes-Small & Jennifer Resor-Whicker | Radford University Are learning styles real? What about the learning pyramid? In this interactive session, you will find out which learning theories are supported by evidence and which ones have been dispelled. We will discuss how you can use this to reframe your teaching, training, and leadership in solid pedagogical practices at your institution. Fabulous prizes await! Relatively few librarians have had formal training in education and pedagogical practices, but many of us are called upon to teach classes and workshops. Often, we fall back on teaching techniques that reflect our personal learning preferences and “gut instincts” about how others learn: this session will include survey results of a study asking instruction librarians to identify the “true” concepts, to explore exactly how wide spread pedagogical myths are in the field. This session will dispel myths, reinforce sound methods, and encourage participants to foster learning strategies supported by cognitive psychology and education research. Presentations | Thursday, May 11, 2017, College of Humanities & Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) Thursday, May 11, 2017, 2:10 – 3:00 pm CHBS 1016 Beyond Popular vs. Scholarly: Teaching Outside the Peer-Reviewed Checkbox Jenny Dale & Lynda Kellam |University of North Carolina at Greensboro For many academic instruction librarians, “popular vs. scholarly” has been a critical tool in our instructional arsenal. This is perhaps especially true for those of us who came into the profession when the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards significantly influenced the way that information literacy was conceived and enacted in higher education. In this session, we will share how the shift from these Standards to the current ACRL Framework has influenced the way we teach source evaluation in one-shot sessions. We will share specific activities that we use to encourage our students to engage with different types of sources beyond a traditional “popular vs. scholarly” framework. These examples draw not only from the ACRL Framework, but are also influenced by fields outside of librarianship. Participants will be asked to share their own experiences teaching source evaluation and to generate new ideas that they can apply in their own practice.
  9. 9. 9 #TILC2017 Thursday, May 11, 2017, 2:10 – 3:00 pm CHBS 3016 Building a Bridge: Using Metaphor to Teach Information Literacy Fun Jen Hasse | Cabrini University Librarians are bridges by which information seekers travel from a questioning place to a knowledge source. Metaphors themselves are also bridges, a means of forging a connection between two things in order to deepen understanding. This program will outline extended metaphors for three fundamentals of information literacy instruction: ethical use of information (“sampling not stealing”); the research process (““date”-a-base searching”; and paraphrasing (“lost in translation”). We will examine how teaching through metaphor aligns with a framework’s approach to information literacy - framework being itself a metaphor. Specifically, we will consider how as bridges, well-developed and creatively expressed metaphors serve to expand conversations, invite critical thinking, and encourage connection making - therefore contributing to engagement, knowledge retention, and better learning outcomes. Thursday, May 11, 2017, 2:10 – 3:00 pm CHBS 3020 Library Live! Collaborating Towards Heightened Information Literacy & Retention in English Composition Classes Denise Woetzel, Joshua Watson, & Suzanne Sherry | J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Learn how librarians are collaborating with an English instructor on an ongoing project to develop, facilitate and assess student-centered information literacy activities in several English Composition I and II class sections. These branded Library Live “class within a class” sessions incorporate student learning outcomes based on the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Unsurprisingly, the redesign of these class sections increased student retention, engagement and success in these key composition courses. Research activities and deliverables as well as pre and post assessment findings will be shared during the session.
  10. 10. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Lightning Talks | Thursday, May 11, 2017, 3:30 – 4:15 p.m., CHBS 1016 They Want Me to Teach APA for 75 Students? Transforming Citation Instruction for Large (or Small) Classes Lisa Becksford | Virginia Tech Of all the research skills that librarians are asked to teach, perhaps none inspires apprehension quite like a request to teach citations. How can we teach this intricate subject in a way that is accurate yet engaging? This lightning talk will demonstrate a way that one librarian has found to successfully teach students in large classes APA citation basics. Rather than having students build citations from scratch, this model assumes that most will be starting with a citation created by a database or citation generator. Therefore, the lesson uses polling tools to engage students in correcting example citations. The beauty of this instruction strategy is that it works for both large and small classes, is successful with both undergraduate and graduate students, and can easily be adapted to citation styles besides APA. During this talk, participants will play the role of student to experience this method for themselves. The Struggle is Real: Facilitating Information Literacy Learning by Being Leaders of Failure Liz McGlynn Bellamy | Radford University Let’s face it—as librarians, we can be a little perfectionistic. But by striving to be flawless in the library classroom, are we getting in the way of the learning experiences of our students? We want our learners to take risks and make mistakes as they research, so how can we model this ourselves? In this talk we’ll discuss how our epic fails in front of the class can actually be the best thing ever for our students’ learning and emotional responses to research, and participants will pick up pointers on how to be less perfect from the podium. Participants will return to their home institutions equipped to be leaders of failure, with tactics for making the struggle of research visible and therefore conquerable. Hole in One: Marketing YOUR Library Services on the Green Vicki Marie Palmer | Longwood University This talk will explain how a mini golf course was integrated into the library for a fun first year student orientation event. The course used child sized plastic putters and was designed using discarded books as boundaries. Each hole was strategically placed at different locations that the students would utilize throughout their career. Locations included the main desk, a librarian’s office, the Writing Center, and the Office of Student Research. The goal of the program was for students to learn about the library services while navigating through the space. Free food and music were provided at the event. Over 300 new students were introduced to the Library on the night of the event.
  11. 11. 11 #TILC2017 Instruction is for Everyone: Including Technical Services Staff in Library Instruction Programs Shannon Tennant | Elon University As academic librarians’ roles continue to evolve, we need to bridge the divide between technical services and public services when it comes to instruction. Our colleagues in technical services have expertise which can strengthen our teaching and student learning. I am the cataloger at our library, and I am an active participant in the instruction program, not only partnering with public services colleagues but also solo teaching and serving as a departmental liaison. Drawing on my experience, I will show how technical services staff can enhance instruction through their deep understanding of the catalog, of data organization, and of indexing and search terms. The talk will include strategies to involve technical services librarians behind the scenes as well as in front of the classroom.
  12. 12. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Posters | Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., College of Humanities & Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) “But I Can’t Go to the Library:” Embedding Librarians in Online Courses Natalie L. Browning | Longwood University Instruction is about availability, both availability for teaching during the class and after for follow- up assistance. However, online students often miss out on the availability of a librarian. They may not have the opportunity to visit the campus library or attend a library instruction session. In order to remedy this fact, my university library is participating in an ongoing embedded librarian program. The class chosen for the pilot program in mid-Fall 2016 was a hybrid class that held optional in-person meetings. It included a research component, and, as it was on an accelerated time frame starting mid-semester, it seemed optimal as a pilot course. This poster will discuss the implications of the beginnings of the embedded librarian program; commitment to virtual availability, consistency in posting content, and collaboration with faculty and librarian colleagues are key components to this program. Lessons learned and tips for moving forward will also be discussed. One-On-One Research Help: Designing Services that Support Enduring Relationships with First-Year Students Jennie Goforth & Kodi Saylor | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill To support student learning, librarians build relationships during instruction that then continue to grow outside the classroom. While our library conducts nearly one hundred instruction sessions a semester, the first-year students we meet in the classroom rarely use our reference services. To continue nurturing relationships begun in the classroom and reach students at their point of need, our library developed a targeted research consultation service that allows first-year students to reconnect with their instruction librarian. Tying into our instruction program, this service offers first-year students a tool to connect and hopes to foster lifelong use of the library. In this poster, we will share how we developed our service, including logistics, marketing, and training. By viewing our service as a case study, participants will be able to apply our strategies to reach special populations at their institutions. Treasure Hunts at the Library: Raiders of the Lost (AR)k Alex Harrington & Garrison Libby | Tidewater Community College We are sending the students out into the library, armed with iPads, treasure maps, and augmented reality (AR) in order to find and use library resources, concepts, and spaces. This poster will include information on development, application, and variations of an augmented-reality-based treasure hunt that can be customized to fit any class in any library, and embedded into a traditional one-shot library instruction session.
  13. 13. 13 #TILC2017 Beyond the CRAAP Test: New Tools for Source Evaluation Joi Jackson | George Mason University Understanding how to evaluate an information resource is crucial to the development of critical thinking skills. However, most of the writing that students do emphasizes scholarly research. After their education, how often will they use these kinds of sources? Have we prepared students to analyze the resources they will encounter beyond the academic context? For this poster session, attendees will engage in a discussion about moving beyond the superficial analysis of sources emphasized by the CRAAP test. Attendees will be introduced to tools that can help students analyze the most important part of the resource - its argument. This is especially important since the majority of students, and our population, receive their information from non-scholarly sources. Let’s discuss how we can prepare our students for their academic work and also provide skills that will be useful beyond the classroom. Meeting Your Student Where They Are: Making the Most of Your School’s LMS Bernadette Miro & Mason Yang | Marymount University Students are used to having information at the tips of their fingertips, that’s mobile friendly and catered to their specific needs - so why aren’t we meeting them where they are? At Marymount University when we switched our LMS provider the library saw an opportunity to engage in a space where all of our students already are and we jumped on it. The library is now integrated into a single course offered via customized LibGuides using Springshare’s LTI tool. Learn how to make the most of your hard work and tips on how to avoid the pitfalls to success! The Game Is Afoot: Information Literacy for First-Year Students Gina O. Petrie | Catawba College This poster session describes research on the effect of incorporating games into instruction for first-year students. It focuses on English 1103, Critical Reading and Writing, the colleges required First-Year Writing Course. Using a mixed methods approach, the researcher compared the results of the traditional lecture-style method with a newer, more creative classroom games technique. Students’ final papers and their citations were examined to determine how appropriate, thorough, and accurate they were. In addition, focus groups were conducted with participating students. This research builds upon research conducted in 2015-16, as a part of the ACRL Assessment in Action Program. In the current study, the researcher expanded the research to include twice the number of faculty members. Focus groups also replaced student surveys as the second method of assessing students’ attitudes and learning.
  14. 14. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Talking Through It: Using Student-to-Student Interviews and Brainstorming Activities for Facilitating Critical Inquiry Krista Schmidt | Western Carolina University At this university, physical chemistry students design and conduct an experiment based on a prompt provided by their professor. Each semester, the STEM librarian hosts a workshop to assist students in developing their experimental design. To encourage critical thinking and to engage students with their partners before they dive into searching for methods and protocols, as well as to help them determine what they already know about the chemistry related to their prompt topic, a student-to-student interview and brainstorming process is initiated at the beginning of the workshop. Among other things, students are asked questions about their understanding of the chemistry related to their prompt, what they do and do not know about the chemistry related to the prompt, and simple ways to redefine the prompt. This poster will provide details about the interview processes used, the brainstorming exercises, and refinements to the process since its inception. Using a Liberal Arts Experiential Learning Process to Teach Library Research Alexandra Voorhees | Roanoke College Liberal arts curricula are increasingly recognizing the value of experiential learning. For many students, such an experience requires an off-campus internship. For students interested in a library career, academic libraries are in a unique position to offer on- campus, hands-on learning experiences that are mutually beneficial to the student and to the academic mission of the library. This poster will document an undergraduate student’s three-year experiential learning project in an academic library. In particular, the student created a survey and gathered data on how her fellow students engaged with the library over a three-year period. She found that students who frequented the library often felt it benefitted their academic achievement. This research led to practical suggestions that can be implemented to improve student experiences in the library. Moreover, such experiences can help to motivate and shape the careers of new generations of motivated, dedicated academic librarians.
  15. 15. 15 #TILC2017 Thank You to Our 2017 Conference Sponsors American Psychological Association http://www.apa.org/ Hollins University’s Wyndham Robertson Library http://www.hollins.edu/library/ Radford University’s McConnell Library http://library.radford.edu/ Roanoke College’s Fintel Library http://libguides.roanoke.edu/library Virginia Library Association http://www.vla.org/ Virginia Tech’s Newman Library http://www.lib.vt.edu/
  16. 16. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA TILC 2017 Conference Committee Candice Benjes-Small (Conference Co-Chair) Radford University Jennifer Resor-Whicker (Conference Co-Chair) Radford University Rebecca Seipp (Conference Co-Chair) Hollins University Alyssa Archer Radford University Craig Arthur Virginia Tech Maryke Barber Hollins University Lisa Becksford Virginia Tech Liz McGlynn Bellamy Radford University Katelyn Tucker Burton Virginia Western Community College Piper Cumbo Roanoke College Lisa Dinkle Radford University Kiri DeBose Goldbeck Virginia Tech Kerri Huff Copus Radford Public Library Rebecca K. Miller (Ex-Officio) The Pennsylvania State University
  17. 17. 17 #TILC2017 TILC 2017 Conference Attendees First name Last name Job Title Organization Email Mary Abdoney Instruction Coordinator Washington and Lee University abdoneym@wlu.edu Annemarie Anderson Librarian Northern Virginia Community College aanderson@nvcc.edu Alyssa Archer Instruction Librarian Radford University aarcher2@radford.edu Craig Arthur Teaching and Learning Engagement Librarian Virginia Tech crarthur@vt.edu Maryke Barber Public Services & Arts Librarian Hollins University mbarber@hollins.edu Cara Barker Research & Instruction Librarian Western Carolina University cmbarker@wcu.edu Lisa Becksford Educational Technologies Librarian Virginia Tech lbecksford@gmail.com Liz Bellamy Reference and Instruction Librarian Radford University emcglynn@radford.edu Candice Benjes- Small Head, IL & Outreach Radford University kimbersmom2@gmail.co m Greta Boers Librarian for Classical Studies Duke University greta.boers@duke.edu Natalie Browning Research Services Librarian Longwood University natalie.browning.07@gma il.com Amy Burns Senior Librarian Central Piedmont Community College amy.burns@cpcc.edu Katelyn Burton Reference & Instruction Librarian Virginia Western Community College katelyntucker09@gmail.co m Peter Catlin Reference Librarian University of Mary Washington pjenkins@umw.edu Monique Clark Reference and Instruction Librarian University of Baltimore mclark@ubalt.edu Julie Combs Emerging Technologies Librarian Northern Virginia Community College jcombs@nvcc.edu Debbie Couch Training Specialist Chesapeake Public Library dcouch@infopeake.org Steve Cramer Business Librarian UNC-Greensboro smcramer@uncg.edu Jenny Dale Information Literacy Coordinator UNC-Greensboro jedale2@uncg.edu Angela Davis Instruction & Web Services Librarian Pitt Community College adavis@email.pittcc.edu Kiri DeBose Librarian for Natural Resources and Animal Sciences Virginia Tech kdebose@vt.edu Kyle Denlinger eLearning Librarian Wake Forest University denlinkd@wfu.edu Lisa Dinkle Instruction Librarian Radford University lisadinkle@gmail.com Dayna Durbin Teaching and Learning Librarian UNC-Chapel Hill ddurbin@email.unc.edu
  18. 18. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Amy Eiben Information Literacy Librarian Coastal Carolina University aeiben@coastal.edu Vickie Einselen Research Support Librarian Bridgewater College VEinselen@bridgewater.e du Diana Finkle Instructional Designer Clemson University dfinkle@clemson.edu Brittany Ford Librarian American Nation University blford14@gmail.com Beate Gersch Coordinator of Instruction University of Akron bgersch@uakron.edu Sara Godbee Business Librarian Stevenson University sgodbee@stevenson.edu Jennie Goforth Research & Design Services Librarian UNC-Chapel Hill jgoforth@unc.edu Kristin E. C. Green Reference & Instruction Librarian Penn State University kristin.green@psu.edu Rebecca Greer Library Instruction Program Coordinator UC-Santa Barbara rrgreer@ucsb.edu Karen Grigg Science Liaison Librarian UNC-Greensboro ksgrigg@uncg.edu Kelsey Hammer Associate UNC-Chapel Hill knhammer@live.unc.edu Samantha Harlow Online Learning Librarian UNC-Greensboro slharlow@uncg.edu Alexandra Harrington Librarian Tidewater Community College aharrington@tcc.edu Angela Harvey Asst. Director, Public Services UVA's College at Wise akw2r@uvawise.edu Jennifer Hasse Information Literacy Librarian Cabrini University jh877@cabrini.edu Elizabeth Heitsch Reference & Social Sciences Librarian University of Mary Washington pjenkins@umw.edu Laura Hess Instruction/Reference Librarian UNC-Pembroke laura.hess@uncp.edu Janet Holly Reference Librarian Virginia Military Institute hollyjs@vmi.edu Kerri Huff Copus Library Clerk Radford Public Library kerri.leah@gmail.com Lauren Irvin Resource Librarian Point Park University lirvin@pointpark.edu Joi Jackson Online Learning Library Specialist George Mason University jaxetc@mac.com Michelle Jerney- Davis Reference Specialist Northern VA Community College mjerneydavis@nvcc.edu Justin Kani Assistant Professor | Business Librarian Mississippi State University justinkani@gmail.com Lynda Kellam Librarian UNC-Greensboro lmkellam@uncg.edu Paula Kiser Instruction and E-Resources Librarian Mary Baldwin University pkiser@marybaldwin.edu Christina LaFon Circulation Coordinator Jefferson College of Health Sciences cllafon@jchs.edu Edward Lener College Librarian for the Sciences Virginia Tech lener@vt.edu Allan Libby Reference Librarian Tidewater Community College garlibby@gmail.com
  19. 19. 19 #TILC2017 Katherine Lynch Librarian American National University klynch@an.edu Elizabeth Marcus Undergraduate Experience Librarian Western Carolina University emarcus@email.wcu.edu Kristen Mastel Outreach and Instruction Librarian University of Minnesota meye0539@umn.edu Bernadette Mirro Digital Learning Initiatives Librarian Marymount University bmirro@marymount.edu Accacia Mullen Evening Librarian Blue Ridge Community College mullena@brcc.edu Vicki Palmer Research Services, Marketing & Outreach Librarian Longwood University palmervm@longwood.edu Gina Petrie Head of Reference and Information Literacy Catawba College gopetrie14@catawba.edu Chanelle Pickens Visiting Instructional Librarian West Virginia University chanelle.pickens@mail.wv u.edu Jamie Price Clinical Research Librarian Jefferson College of Health Sciences jbprice1@jchs.edu Michele Ren Associate Professor of English Radford University mren2@radford.edu Jennifer Resor- Whicker Ref/Instr & Honors Academy Librarian Radford University jrwhicker@radford.edu Sarah Reynolds Research Services Librarian Longwood University reynoldsst@longwood.edu Patrick Rudd Coordinator of Library Instruction and Outreach Elon University prudd@elon.edu Joan Ruelle Dean & University Librarian Elon University jruelle@elon.edu Lucinda Rush Education Reference Librarian Old Dominion University lrush@odu.edu Rachel Sanders Instructional Design & Assessment Librarian Guilford College sandersrc@guilford.edu Lara Sapp Health Sciences Librarian James Madison University sapple@jmu.edu Kodi Saylor Research Assistant UNC-Chapel Hill kodi@email.unc.edu Krista Schmidt STEM Liaison Western Carolina University kschmidt@wcu.edu Lindy Scripps- Hoekstra Liaison Librarian Grand Valley State University scrippsl@gvsu.edu Rebecca Seipp Outreach & Humanities Librarian Hollins University seipprl@hollins.edu Kristan Shawgo Social Sciences Librarian UNC-Chapel Hill shawgo@email.unc.edu Suzanne Sherry Coordinator of Library Services, Parham Road Campus J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College sherryclan@yahoo.com Brittany Soder LIS Student UNC-Chapel Hill britt36@live.unc.edu Nancy Speisser Interim Assistant Vice Chancellor for University Libraries South University Virginia Beach nspeisser@southuniversit y.edu
  20. 20. The Innovative Library Classroom 2017: Teaching, Learning, and Leading Radford University, Radford, VA Brandon Stilley Evening Reference Librarian East Carolina University stilleyb@ecu.edu Cori Strickler Learning Services Librarian Bridgewater College cstrickl@bridgewater.edu Shannon Tennant Coordinator of Library Collections Elon University stennant@elon.edu Crasha Townsend Director for Diversity and Engagement Radford University ctownsend3@radford.edu Lisa Vassady Research Help Desk Coordinator Radford University ljvassady@radford.edu Alexandra Voorhees Student Assistant Roanoke College akvoorhees@mail.roanoke .edu Jennifer Walz Head of Research & Distance Services Asbury University jlwalz@asbury.edu Josh Watson Instructor - English Composition Reynolds Community College jwatson@reynolds.edu Denise Wetzel Extension and Instruction Librarian Mississippi State University dwetzel@library.msstate.e du Kelli Williams First Year & Transfer Services Librarian Carson-Newman University kwilliams@cn.edu Carly Winfield Public Services Library Specialist College of William and Mary cwinfield@rbc.edu Samantha Winn Collections Archivist Virginia Tech samw@vt.edu Denise Woetzel Reference/Information Literacy Librarian J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College mwoetzel@reynolds.edu Hubert Womack Instruction and Outreach Librarian Wake Forest University womack@wfu.edu Erin Wysong Reference and Sciences Librarian University of Mary Washington pjenkins@umw.edu Mason Yang Electronic Services Librarian Marymount University mason.yang@marymount. edu Jamane Yeager Electronic Access Librarian Elon University jyeager@elon.edu
  21. 21. 21 #TILC2017 Thank you for attending the 4th Annual Innovative Library Classroom Conference. We hope to see you in 2018!

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