Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
May	11-12,	2016	
Radford	University
TILC	2016	Schedule	at	a	Glance	
Wednesday,	May	11,	2016	
6:00	to	8:00	pm	 Preconference	Social	and	Poster	Session	
McConne...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Thursday,	May...
3	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
Keynote	|	Thursday,	May	12,	2016,	9:00	am,	Davis...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Posters	|	Wed...
5	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
Balancing	Theory	and	Practice:	Using	the	ACRL	Fr...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Writing	on	th...
7	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
What	Has	Twitter	Done	for	You	Lately?	Encouragin...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Presentations...
9	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
Reframing	a	General	Education	Course:	A	Case	Stu...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Finding	a	Bal...
11	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
In	Person,	Online	and	In	Between:	Finding	Balan...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Embracing	the...
13	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
Lightning	Talks	|	Thursday,	May	12,	2016,	3:30	...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
Creating	Lear...
15	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
TILC	Thanks	its	2016	Conference	Sponsors		
	
Ba...
The	Innovative	Library	Classroom	2016:	Bringing	Balance	to	Our	Success	
Radford	University,	Radford,	VA	
	
	
TILC	Conferen...
17	 #TILC2016	–	Winner	of	the	2016	Beta	Phi	Mu	Conference	Support	Award	
	
	
Thank	you	for	attending	the		
3rd
	Annual	Inn...
TILC 2016 Program
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

TILC 2016 Program

476 views

Published on

Program for The Innovative Library Classroom 2016 held at Radford University on May 11-12, 2016.

Published in: Education
  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

TILC 2016 Program

  1. 1. Bringing Balance to Our Success May 11-12, 2016 Radford University
  2. 2. TILC 2016 Schedule at a Glance Wednesday, May 11, 2016 6:00 to 8:00 pm Preconference Social and Poster Session McConnell Library, Radford University Poster Sessions Cara Barker | Western Carolina University Information Literacy to Order: Creating Opportunities for Instruction Mike Courtney & Leanne Mobley | Indiana University Seeing What Students See: Bringing Virtual Reality to the Library Classroom with Google Cardboard Wendy Doucette | East Tennessee State University Balancing Theory and Practice: Using the ACRL Framework to Teach How Academic Research Works Jennie Goforth | University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill The More, the Media-er: Finding Partners to Expand Media Instruction Capability Paula S. Kiser | Mary Baldwin College Writing on the Walls: Using Whiteboard Walls to Engage Student Learning Lucretia McCulley | University of Richmond Gender and Scholarly Publishing: What Do Students Need to Know? Jonathan McMichael & Laura Dimmit | University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill Becoming Legit: Reimagining Instructor Support through Communities of Practice Abby Moore | University of North Carolina – Charlotte What Has Twitter Done for You Lately? Encouraging Students to Build a PLN Maggie Nunley & Paula Roy | University of Virginia Letting Go: How Students Can Find Their Own Way Tim Schlak | Robert Morris University Balancing Relationships – Librarians, Instruction, and Social Capital
  3. 3. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Thursday, May 12, 2016 Davis 151 Young 305 Young 311 9:00 – 9:15 am Opening Remarks 9:15 – 10:00 am Keynote: Donna Lanclos, UNC – Charlotte When the Active Learning Agenda Comes to Town 10:10 – 11:00 am Maryke Barber Hollins University Balance Through Mindfulness: The Art of Now in the Library Classroom Alex Harrington & Garrison Libby Tidewater Community College Chasing the White WHALE: iPad-Based Library Instruction Holly Mabry & Natalie Bishop Gardner-Webb University Finding a Balance: Using Qualitative Data to Identify Student Learning Barriers and Alleviate Instructor Burnout in an Online Information Literacy Course 11:10 am – 12:00 pm Patrick Rudd & Paula Patch Elon University Co-Owners in Engaged Learning: Reimagining the Library-First Year Partnership as a Community of Practice Julia Feerrar & Rebecca K. Miller Virginia Tech & Penn State University Building a Balanced Portfolio: Investing in TAs and Other Contingent Faculty Meridith Wolnick & Paula Roy University of Virginia Embracing the Hulk: Maintaining Your Instruction Program's Smashing Success 12:00 – 1:10 pm Lunch 1:10 – 2:00 pm Jill Markgraf University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire Flipped and Floundering? Strategies for Facilitating Authentic Learner-Centered Inquiry in the Active Library Classroom Anna Sandelli The University of Tennessee, Knoxville In Person, Online, and In Between: Finding Balance as Instruction Increases Katelyn Tucker Burton & Alyssa Archer Radford University Scale-Up Strategies for Selfie Scavengering **Meet at Young Patio Doors – session will be in McConnell Library 2:10 – 3:00 pm Liz Thompson, Howard Carrier & Bethany Mickel James Madison University Taking the First Step to Develop Scalable Asynchronous Library Instruction Erin Vonnahme Miami University "Animals in human situations," OR "Forest & Forestry -- Menstruation": Using Subject Headings and Controlled Vocabularies in Beginning Information Literacy Instruction Jenny Dale & Lynda Kellam UNC – Greensboro Reframing a General Education Course: A Case Study of the ACRL Framework in Action 3:00 – 3:30 pm Afternoon Break 3:30 – 4:15 pm Lightning Talks 4:15 – 4:30 pm Closing Remarks
  4. 4. 3 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award Keynote | Thursday, May 12, 2016, 9:00 am, Davis 151 When the Active Learning Agenda Comes to Town Donna Lanclos | University of North Carolina – Charlotte I want to get at the sense that active learning manifests as a range of practices and spaces, and the importance of institutional culture in helping (or getting in the way of) these initiatives. How can leadership work to provide the space for these unruly yet effective practices? How can we move beyond justifying the practices, and instead integrating them into our everyday notions of what teaching and learning are? What can the role of the library be, campus-wide, in making these practices possible, effective, visible, and sustainable? I will talk about the work I've been doing in our own active learning classrooms at UNC Charlotte, and also draw on recent work I've been engaging in around leadership and institutional change. Donna Lanclos is an anthropologist working with ethnographic methods and analysis to inform and change policy in higher education, in particular in and around libraries, learning spaces, and teaching and learning practices. She is Associate Professor for Anthropological Research at the J. Murrey Atkins Library at UNC Charlotte. Donna has conducted anthropological research in libraries at University College London as well as at UNC Charlotte, and regularly presents workshops and talks in the US and the UK. She has worked with various institutions, including Carnegie Mellon, Parsons the New School, the Wellcome Trust, Imperial College (London), Kingston University (London), and the University of South Carolina (Upstate), on issues of digital practices and institutional change. She blogs about these and other projects at www.donnalanclos.com, and you can also find her on Twitter @DonnaLanclos.
  5. 5. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Posters | Wednesday, May 11, 2016, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., McConnell Library Information Literacy to Order: Creating Opportunities for Instruction Cara Barker | Western Carolina University Faculty in the studio art department at Western Carolina University do not regularly ask for instruction for their students but often mention their frustration with students’ inability to locate appropriate information for assignments. Instruction menus, which offer faculty a selection of information literacy (IL) options, help academic librarians and teaching faculty to collaboratively build a customized information literacy program. Grounded in ARLIS/NA’s Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines and the results of a faculty survey, this project produced a content rich online menu that introduces faculty to instruction options designed for studio art students. Each IL module focuses on a concept and offers faculty options for utilizing the content in a session with the librarian; embedding the material into Blackboard; or working with the librarian to incorporate the material into a new or existing class assignment. The poster documents the creation of the instruction menu including examples of content. Seeing What Students See: Bringing Virtual Reality to the Library Classroom with Google Cardboard Mike Courtney & Leanne Mobley | Indiana University The true power of virtual reality really rests in its application to the classroom: as a learning tool, it has limitless potential for creating a shared group experience, facilitated by a teacher, to travel to and think critically about complex places and concepts. Being virtually anywhere, seeing through others’ eyes, and engaging with all of the senses have profound effects on the learning experience. Two librarians engaged in a peer-assisted learning virtual reality project with a team of students to create a more inclusive and engaging tour of the library system for their peers. Students created a virtual tour of the libraries using Google Street View, capturing and sharing Photo Spheres (360-degree panoramic images) with smartphones. This poster discusses the peer-assisted learning virtual reality project and how this model can be adapted to the library classroom, featuring imagery from the virtual tour, and providing an opportunity to use Google Cardboard.
  6. 6. 5 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award Balancing Theory and Practice: Using the ACRL Framework to Teach How Academic Research Works Dr. Wendy Doucette | East Tennessee State University The ACRL Information Literacy Framework condenses the research process into simple threshold concepts. This poster offers straightforward, classroom-tested advice on introducing these concepts to an academic audience. These strategies are appropriate for high-level undergraduates, participants in honors programs, and those interested in graduate school. In Fall 2015, East Tennessee State University began a comprehensive workshop series providing graduate-level research support. Directly based on the Framework, the first offering, “How Academic Research Works,” is a high-level overview of the scholarly research process. While student reaction was positive, the Framework concepts are not what the new graduate student needs most. The More, the Media-er: Finding Partners to Expand Media Instruction Capability Jennie Goforth | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill The SkillfUL Tech Workshop series has been an increasingly successful program for the Undergraduate Library at UNC-Chapel Hill. These drop-in workshops focus on various digital design projects that many students, staff, and faculty members are creating: websites, academic posters, resumes, infographics, etc. In the fall of 2015, we wanted to expand this program and offer more classes, but we simply didn’t have the resources (both in terms of time and talent). Most of our sessions have focused primarily on how to use various technology tools (Wordpress, Photoshop, etc.), but these skills would be most useful to our patrons if paired with more conceptual knowledge (such as website usability and digital photography techniques). To build on our current success and continue to grow our program, we are partnering with various faculty members and student support departments to co-teach classes that will cover both the technology and the concepts. For example, an art faculty member will teach photography techniques, which will be followed by a session on manipulating those photos in Photoshop. Our potential partners include: the art department, the makerspace, career services, the communications department, campus IT, and library UX. This poster presentation will discuss how we made these partnerships, what topics we decided to include in our spring workshops, and an assessment of the program.
  7. 7. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Writing on the Walls: Using Whiteboard Walls to Engage Student Learning Paula S. Kiser | Mary Baldwin College During the summer of 2015, Mary Baldwin College librarians remodeled their instruction classroom as a flexible learning space with whiteboard walls. They redesigned information literacy classes (INT 103) and one-shot sessions to incorporate active learning beyond database searches, getting students to stand up and start writing on the walls. Students used the whiteboard walls for a variety of activities such as developing concept maps and brainstorming source types, generating their own ideas and helping each other. Beyond the enjoyment of writing on a formerly forbidden surface, an added goal was to improve retention of the content. We measured the success of these activities by surveying the students about how much they remember from those activities, asking them to provide examples of the content. Gender and Scholarly Publishing: What Do Students Need to Know? Lucretia McCulley | University of Richmond As women and gender studies students emerge as citizens of the world, how can we educate them on scholarly communication issues? What role, if any, does gender play in successful scholarly publishing? How is open access publishing affecting global access to scholarship on gender? How do students’ lives on the Web influence their understanding of copyright? Women and gender studies students need to understand the economics and legal aspects of scholarship, both as consumers and content creators. They need to be able to thoughtfully discuss who owns information, who controls it and who has access to it. Students also need to understand recent research and discussions about the “gender gap” in scholarly publishing. The poster will examine the above questions and issues and offer examples and ideas of how librarians can effectively teach and lead discussions about scholarly publishing, copyright and open access information. Becoming Legit: Reimagining Instructor Support through Communities of Practice Jonathan McMichael & Laura Dimmit | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill To support student learning, we must start by supporting ourselves as educators. This pedagogical development is especially key for novice instructors, who are building both confidence and skill in their first years as librarians. Informed by Lave and Wenger's model of the community of practice, we have reimagined instructor support and development at UNC-Chapel Hill. In this session, we will share how we have engineered an environment that enables continued progress toward legitimate peripheral participation. By understanding UNC-Chapel Hill as a case study, participants will be able to apply these principles in their own institutions to support instructors at all levels.
  8. 8. 7 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award What Has Twitter Done for You Lately? Encouraging Students to Build a PLN Abby Moore | University of North Carolina at Charlotte Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat, Facebook, Pinterest. Our students are connected! But what are they getting out of the time and effort they put into staying connected? Each semester I teach my first-year education students how and why to build a Professional Learning Network. I challenge them to make social media work for them. In what ways do you challenge your students? The purpose of this poster is to start a conversation about innovative ways liaison librarians can connect with their students, promote library resources, and change the conception of what their librarians have to offer them in the classroom and in the "real world." Letting Go: How Students Can Find Their Own Way Maggie Nunley & Paula Roy | University of Virginia First-year students arrive to college eager to learn about everything, but somewhere amidst the chaos of schoolwork and navigating a new community, that enthusiasm fades. Faced with the problem of how to engage students still new to campus but no longer enthusiastic about participating in a library class, we created an exercise that provides an opportunity to explore the library without the physical presence of the librarian. The result is a scavenger hunt that avoids the pitfalls of many traditional versions, provides students with a challenge, and gives them opportunities to investigate spaces they otherwise may never have explored. Balancing Relationships – Librarians, Instruction, and Social Capital Tim Schlak | Robert Morris University Instruction librarians have never been busier. With instruction counts increasing, liaison duties and programs expanding and growing, and academic libraries moving to the intellectual heart of their campuses, the ability to balance and prioritize has never been more important to today’s librarians. This poster presents social capital as an innovative concept that can serve as a useful lens for overworked librarians to frame their all- important faculty relationships and instruction in a socially productive context. Presenting the results of one of the only research studies ever to collect qualitative data on actual faculty-librarian relationships, the poster explains and advocates for the role of trust, trustworthiness, networking, and communication as fundamental tenets in the faculty- librarian dynamic where instruction increasingly thrives in 21st century academic libraries.
  9. 9. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Presentations | Thursday, May 12, 2016, Davis & Young Halls Balance Through Mindfulness: The Art of Now in the Library Classroom Maryke Barber | Hollins University Stress, anxiety, and distraction can keep students from learning. They also keep you from being an effective teacher. Mindfulness and other contemplative practices offer tools to counteract these challenges. This session combines an overview of current applications of mindfulness in higher education with direct experience of mindfulness as a learning tool. You will be invited to participate in several contemplative exercises such as breathing meditation and reflective writing. The presenter will share experience of mindfulness in one-shot sessions and a full course; attendees will also be invited to share. A review of the literature will focus on practical examples from a variety of classrooms. We will also review the research into cognitive and emotional benefits such as increased focus and retention, an ability to attend without judgment, and less stress. Scale-up Strategies for Selfie Scavengering Katelyn Tucker Burton & Alyssa Archer | Radford University This interactive workshop invites attendees to take on the role of a first-year student and play through our selfie scavenger hunt. This game doubles as a self-guided tour through the host library’s physical space and service points. It is tailored to increase students’ comfort in using the library as a physical space in less than 50 minutes with help from using iPods and Evernote. Prizes await! Presenters will discuss how they remixed the game (created at Longwood University) to their environment and the requirements of their home institution, assessments. We will also explore the strengths and drawbacks of this orientation approach, particularly in regards to scalability.
  10. 10. 9 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award Reframing a General Education Course: A Case Study of the ACRL Framework in Action Jenny Dale & Lynda Kellam | University of North Carolina – Greensboro In 2011, UNCG’s Political Science Librarian began teaching a general education course in the Political Science department. In order to maximize information literacy course integration, she partnered with the First-Year Instruction Librarian. As instructional partners, we have used this course for information literacy innovation and experimentation, working collaboratively to develop assignments and to design library instruction experiences. During this partnership, ACRL developed their new Framework, which has begun to influence our collaboration. This year we made significant changes to the research assignment and the library instruction session, focusing on two of the ACRL frames: authority is constructed and contextual, and research as inquiry. In this presentation, we will describe the evolution of our partnership, with a focus on changes to library instruction and to the research assignment. Participants in the session will leave with ideas for faculty collaboration as well as assignment and instruction redesign based on the ACRL Framework. Building a Balanced Portfolio: Investing in TAs and Other Contingent Faculty Julia Feerrar & Rebecca K. Miller | Virginia Tech & Penn State University This session explores approaches for collaborating with course instructors to move beyond the one-shot workshop, using library engagement with first year writing at a large university as a case study. With increasing enrollment, growing instruction requests, and high instructor turnover, integration with core and first year courses often tests the scalability of our information literacy programs and the energy of our library teaching teams. To address these concerns, our team has developed a portfolio of experimental teaching options, including flipped classes, drop-in studios, integration with departmental training, and a teaching toolkit. With these new models, we step beyond what we traditionally think of as the library classroom, build on partnerships with teaching assistants, and bring balance to our program. Participants will leave this session with sample strategies for thinking creatively about instructional roles in order to scale and reenergize their programs. Chasing the White WHALE: iPad-Based Library Instruction Alex Harrington & Garrison Libby | Tidewater Community College Tidewater Community College librarians will share their experiences from their first two semesters using an iPad-based library classroom (affectionately known as the WHALE: the Wireless Hub of Active Library Education). Discussion topics will include: the challenges and successes of implementing such a classroom; how the project has increased active learning in their library instruction sessions; and how to apply the concepts of an iPad- based classroom to a traditional classroom as well.
  11. 11. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Finding a Balance: Using Qualitative Data to Identify Student Learning Barriers and Alleviate Instructor Burnout in an Online Information Literacy Course Holly Mabry & Natalie Bishop | Gardner-Webb University For-credit information literacy instruction is starting to gain momentum in academic libraries because they provide students with more opportunities to engage in library resources and services. They also equip students with more in-depth research skills to use throughout their academic career. In this session, presenters will give an overview of their library’s for-credit online research skills course for non-traditional students. They will identify student learning barriers, describe qualitative measures such as Quality Matters and document analysis assignments are used to improve the course over time, and discuss innovative long-range tools and objectives. This session will also discuss how to minimize instructor burnout in an environment with a small number of instructors and a high course volume. Consistent course assessment and improvement, a good instructor feedback and support system, and opportunities to share exciting new tools and ideas are just a few examples of what will be covered. Flipped and Floundering? Strategies for Facilitating Authentic Learner-Centered Inquiry in the Active Library Classroom Jill Markgraf | University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire Now that we’ve gone and flipped the classroom, librarians are able to spend their valuable face-to-face time with students engaging in higher-order learning through exploration, inquiry, and discussion. Doing so effectively requires that librarians hone skills in leading meaningful discussions, letting student inquiry drive the session, promoting peer learning and being comfortable without a script. This session draws upon the literature on classroom discussion and the art of improv and applies them to the unique challenges librarians face in teaching situations. Attendees should expect to actively participate in this session, building confidence and exercising skills in listening, responding, and adapting to an unscripted teaching and learning environment. Co-Owners in Engaged Learning: Reimagining the Library-First Year Writing Partnership as a Community of Practice Patrick Rudd & Paula Patch | Elon University Presenters will describe the evolution of a model of library instruction for first-year writing students that simultaneously reflects and highlights the changing roles of faculty librarians and their relationship to faculty. Through the process of revising library instruction, faculty librarians and writing faculty moved from collaborators to co-owners of the curriculum, resulting in the development of a community of practice in which neither librarians nor faculty feel adjunct to the instruction taking place. Instead, this robust relationship positions library and writing faculty as co-teachers and co-developers, equally responsible for the success of first-year students.
  12. 12. 11 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award In Person, Online and In Between: Finding Balance as Instruction Increases Anna Sandelli | The University of Tennessee, Knoxville One-shot sessions. Larger-scale auditorium assemblies. An assignment-embedded LibGuide. Over the span of three years, library instruction for Public Speaking, one of our university’s largest enrollment general education courses, has shifted from the classroom to the computer screen. This shift has presented new opportunities for assessment while promoting scalability and flexibility. At the same time, it has limited opportunities for enrolled students to see librarians as partners in, and resources for, their research process. This session will highlight learnings involved in transitioning to an online information literacy approach and librarians’ exploration of supplementary offerings to support both students and instructors. In addition to discussing takeaways applicable to a variety of instructional settings, participants will be encouraged to join in an ongoing conversation about finding equilibrium between fostering student connections and providing scalable, sustainable instruction. Taking the First Step to Develop Scalable Asynchronous Library Instruction Liz Thompson, Howard Carrier, & Bethany Mickel | James Madison University Scalable equals asynchronous. And asynchronous equals boring. Or does it? The First Year Writing program at JMU offers more than 60 sections of the foundational first-year writing course each semester to more than one thousand students and is supported by one librarian. In an effort to reach more than the usual 20 one-shot sessions each semester, a small team from the library planned and built an asynchronous, modular tutorial series. Now, information literacy instruction is provided using a tool called Guide on the Side (GotS) and uses short scenario videos and additional content followed by activities and assessment to improve student outcomes and engagement. In this foundational program, the new and engaging asynchronous materials are the first step of a library instruction model that aims to reach as many students as possible while still being sustained by one librarian. “Animals in human situations” OR “Forest & forestry--Menstruation”: Using Subject Headings and Controlled Vocabularies in Beginning Information Literacy Instruction Erin Vonnahme | Miami University Skillful search savvy can be intimidating to beginning researchers, and, much to my chagrin, most of my students don’t prefer to wax philosophical about controlled vocabularies. How, then, can I stay excited about my work in the face of my own necessary repetition and of my students’ skepticism, anxiety, or boredom? By re-tooling my approach to introductory information literacy sessions, I can demonstrate more sophisticated search technique to new audiences without becoming a broken record (good for me) or mired in technical jargon (good for them). Students benefit by learning how to begin research beyond the keyword, and I remain jazzed about how fun research can be in the bizarre and esoteric rabbit holes of an academic database.
  13. 13. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Embracing the Hulk: Maintaining Your Instruction Program’s Smashing Success Meridith Wolnick & Paula Roy | University of Virginia What happens when your mild-mannered instruction program morphs into The Hulk? In this case study, we will take a 360- degree view of how a successful instruction program at the University of Virginia grew beyond our existing capabilities. During this session, we will describe our successful efforts to reach as many students as possible and the unforeseen factors that caused the program to expand beyond our current capacity. We will use our account as a framework for recognizing indicators that your instruction program may be growing bigger than your present resources allow, and we will share organizational and personal strategies for managing an increased workload while maintaining staff energy and commitment. By the end of the session, you will have the tools you need to rein in your own beautiful beast.
  14. 14. 13 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award Lightning Talks | Thursday, May 12, 2016, 3:30 – 4:15 p.m., Davis 151 Make Them Get Their Heads in the Clouds: Is it Worth Teaching Digital Natives the Importance of Cloud Based Technology? Joanna Anderson | East Tennessee State University This lightning talk will discuss the prospects of offering student workshops on how to use Google Education Apps and Microsoft 365. Google Education Apps and Microsoft 365 are two platforms that many colleges use today. Student emails are typically Outlook or Gmail products, which allows students access to a whole suite of cloud based products, including storage, that will make their lives easier. Marc Prensky coined the term “Digital Native” in 2001, stating “students today are all ‘native speakers’ of the digital language of computers, video games and the Internet”. When most these Digital Natives get to college, they believe they are technologically proficient, yet when we get them in instruction sessions and work with them one-on-one, many students are clueless about cloud technology. How can we as librarians illustrate to students how important it is to know this technology? Librarians should bring ideas, benefits, challenges, and lessons learned. Started with Anti-Plagiarism Workshops Now We’re Here: Drake Meets Library Instruction Craig Arthur | Radford University You love it when your email blings. That can mean many things; one of them is the opportunity to co-teach a class with everyone’s favorite Canadian rapper. Of all the possible teaching partners, the MC with both an owl as his mascot and the most number one hits is a solid choice for connecting with students as well as the Research as a Conversation frame of the ACRL framework. We will analyze music as an entry point to a more inspiring discussion of plagiarism, explore differing conventions, and reconsider popular culture as a conversation. This discussion will provide best practices that will allow you to bring both your students’ and your own personal interests into the classroom. If all goes well, this conversation will lead to increased student engagement at your institution. And if it does not go well? We will learn from our mistakes and try harder.
  15. 15. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA Creating Learner Personas for the Library Classroom Amanda Foster | Wake Forest University Personas are often used by user experience designers and web developers to create realistic profiles of their intended users. These personas allow them to anticipate the needs of their users and ultimately build better websites and systems. Likewise, developing learner personas of our students increases our awareness of our students’ needs, experiences, and motivations as we develop instructional content – particularly online learning content. Learner personas are evidence-based (created by conducting quantitative and qualitative student research) and include basic demographic information like year in school and intended major, as well as previous library experience. They also include information about external factors that influence learning in the classroom, such as whether the student is an athlete, an international student, a commuter, or requires learning assistance, etc. This lightning talk will briefly touch on one librarian’s experience conducting student research to create learner personas, how they were used, and how others might do the same. Students as Knowledge Creators: Metacognition and Discussion Robert Miller | University of Maryland, University College I teach an online library-research class that is primarily skills-based: how to search a database, how to cite an article, and so on. Wanting to incorporate elements of the Framework into the class, I assigned a discussion topic encouraging metacognition: I asked students to write about themselves as knowledge creators. In designing the assignment, I sought feedback from librarians on the ACRL Framework listserv. The resulting assignment offered students background on the concept of knowledge creation, then prompted them to discuss how they find and evaluate information and build on that information to create knowledge and share it with others. Students wrote about their jobs, hobbies, and other contexts in which they create and share knowledge. I will present an overview of the assignment and its results as well as plans to extend the assignment into related activities incorporating the Framework into the class. The Biggest Lies on the Internet: Using Real Life Examples to Help Students Master the Information Literacy Concepts Lucinda Rush | Old Dominion University Teaching students how the information cycle works is a common instructional goal for academic librarians. Oftentimes we do this by showing them examples of how things work under ideal circumstances. By sharing case studies in information cycles that have short- circuited, either due to moral panics about the impact of new technologies or due to poor reporting gone bad on social media, we can teach students how to be critical readers of empirical research-based claims. In this lightening talk, the presenter will provide examples of incorporating these case studies into library instruction settings and share ideas that will help to bridge the gap between real-life experiences of the information cycle and student research assignments.
  16. 16. 15 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award TILC Thanks its 2016 Conference Sponsors Barrows Furniture http://www.barrowsinc.com/ Beta Phi Mu http://beta-phi-mu.org/ EBSCO https://www.ebscohost.com/ Hollins University’s Wyndham Robertson Library http://www.hollins.edu/library/ Radford University’s McConnell Library http://library.radford.edu/ Roanoke College’s Fintel Library http://libguides.roanoke.edu/library Virginia Library Association http://www.vla.org/ Virginia Tech’s Newman Library http://www.lib.vt.edu/
  17. 17. The Innovative Library Classroom 2016: Bringing Balance to Our Success Radford University, Radford, VA TILC Conference Committee 2016 Candice Benjes-Small (Conference Co-Chair) Radford University Jennifer Resor-Whicker (Conference Co-Chair) Radford University Rebecca Seipp (Conference Co-Chair) Hollins University Alyssa Archer Radford University Craig Arthur Radford University Maryke Barber Hollins University Katelyn Tucker Burton Radford University Emily Cook Washington & Lee University Piper Cumbo Roanoke College Julia Feerrar Virginia Tech Kiri DeBose Goldbeck Virginia Tech Kerri Huff Virginia Tech Rebecca K. Miller (Ex-Officio) Penn State University Brandi Porter Ferrum College Elizabeth Teaff Washington & Lee University
  18. 18. 17 #TILC2016 – Winner of the 2016 Beta Phi Mu Conference Support Award Thank you for attending the 3rd Annual Innovative Library Classroom Conference. We hope to see you in 2017!

×