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Swedish Antiques Master Class presented by Toma Clark Haines The Antiques Diva at Dallas Market Center

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The Golden Age: The most important Swedish furniture styles and periods
 (watch on Facebook LIVE: https://www.facebook.com/TomaClarkHaines/videos/10209172756975863/ by Toma Clark Haines – CEO The Antiques Diva & Co
and Diva Guide Swedish Antiques Expert Daniel Larsson – D Larsson Antiques & Interiors)
• Stockholm Pieces vs. Manor vs. Folk Art 

• Transitional Pieces
• Original Paint
• Fakes

• Period vs. Style
In the 18th Century the government instigated a ban on the import on furniture thus igniting one of the greatest cultural contributions to the history of furniture making. As a result of the ban - national furniture making took off creating Masterpieces that would change the history of antiques.

In 1846 the guild system dissolved in Sweden and the carpenter's strict quality controls ceased. Cabinetmakers were now able to freely practice their craft. During the second half of the 19th century it became more common with machine-made parts and the handmade furniture decreased most significantly and unfortunately so did the quality.

Much of the Swedish furniture currently available on the "antique" market has been comprehensively rebuilt and restored, often repainted in popular pale colors and sadly some of these created or "style" pieces are sold as period. It is paramount to pay attention and look closely. 
During the 80’s and 90’s a lot of furniture with original color was unfortunately destroyed by chemicals.

In conclusion: Pieces that look Gustavian but were made one or two hundred years later or even last year are properly designated in the Gustavian style.

The Antiques Diva & Co http://antiquesdiva.com/ is the largest antiques touring company in the world
. We offer one-on-one customized antique buying tours on 3 continents – EUROPE, ASIA and USA and 15 countries. To book an antiques buying tour in Europe, Asia or America with \ contact Toma: info@antiquesdiva.com

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Swedish Antiques Master Class presented by Toma Clark Haines The Antiques Diva at Dallas Market Center

  1. 1. Swedish Antiques Master Class Dallas Market Center June Market 2017
  2. 2. Toma Clark Haines – CEO The Antiques Diva & Co Daniel Larsson – D Larsson Antiques & Interiors
  3. 3. ◇In the 18th C the government instigated a ban on the import on furniture thus igniting one of the greatest cultural contributions to the history of furniture making. ◇As a result of the ban - national furniture making took off creating Masterpieces that would change the history of antiques. The Golden Age Today we’re going to be talking to you about the Golden Age of Antiques.
  4. 4. The Golden Age In the 18th century there were 3 important Swedish furniture periods
  5. 5. In case you think this is going to be a boring class about the history of furniture… I should warn you… “this is not your grandmothers antiques class!” At The Antiques Diva & Co our mission is to Make Antiques Fun, Sexy, Relevant and Modern. Swedish Antiques help us achieve our goal more so than any other of our antiques buying tours!
  6. 6. ◇ The Antiques Diva & Co is the largest antiques touring company in the world ◇ We offer one-on-one customized antique buying tours on 3 continents – EUROPE, ASIA and USA and 15 countries France Belgium Holland Germany Netherlands Italy Denmark Sweden ◇ We also have our own in-house shipping division called AD&CO Logistics ◇ And we’re working on developing our own line of furniture care and restoration products Thailand Vietnam Laos Cambodia Myanmar Indonesia USA
  7. 7. MEET SOME OF THE ANTIQUES DIVA TEAM – YOUR DIVA GUIDES
  8. 8. D.Larsson Interiör & Antikhandel specialises in 18th - 19th century Swedish painted antiques carefully selected by their high quality, distinquished design, uniqueness and remarkable finish. Along the years they have had the privilege to work with many of the world’s leading architects, interior designers as well as with private collectors. Their clients know that the fact that we live and work in Sweden we have the possibility to source the best items Sweden has to offer. Their Showroom in Helsingborg, Sweden is located in a historic mid-19th century building in the oldest neighborhood of Helsingborg.Daniel Larsson D. Larsson Swedish Antiques Antiques Diva – er make that Divo Guide
  9. 9. Making Antiques Modern
  10. 10. Modern Vibe Jill Dienst - Antiques Dealer’s Scandinavian-Inspired New York City Home in Architectural Digest
  11. 11. Modern Vibe Jill Dienst - Antiques Dealer’s Scandinavian-Inspired New York City Home in Architectural Digest
  12. 12. ”Put your money where your mouth is…” Antiques Diva Headquarters Making Antiques Modern
  13. 13. ◇ The Golden Age ◇ The most important Swedish furniture styles and periods ◇ Stockholm pieces vs. Manor vs. Folk Art ◇ Transitional Pieces ◇ Original Paint ◇ Fakes ◇ Period vs. Style Outline
  14. 14. ◇ The end of King Karl the XII's wars and the King's death in 1718, contributed to a period of peace in the country, the economy flourished and prosperity increased. ◇ Those who could afford it, put down large sums of money to decorate and beautify their homes. ◇ During the first half of the 18th century a significant amount of furniture was imported, mainly from England. ◇ To support the domestic carpenters and carvers the Swedish government decided to ban the importation of furniture in 1731. The Golden Age
  15. 15. ◇ The peace, prosperity and ban contributed to an unprecedented development of indigenous furniture making, having its apogee during the second half of 18th the century. ◇Never before or since have the artisans been so prolific and skillful. ◇This was the period when furniture design and construction evolved into fine art. ◇Today the 18th century is generally regarded as the "golden age" of antique Swedish furniture. The Golden Age
  16. 16. The Golden Age
  17. 17. The Golden Age STOCKHOLM PIECES VS PROVINCIAL
  18. 18. The three most important furniture styles and periods in Sweden
  19. 19. French Comparison
  20. 20. ◇Baroque was popular on the continent during the 17th century. ◇The style did not reach Sweden until after the Thirty Year War with Russia, around the year 1650. ◇This made the style last longer than on the continent. Baroque 1650 – 1750
  21. 21. Historical Context Baroque 1650 – 1750 ◇ Let’s put this in perspective…. What else was happening in the world at this time? ◇ American was being colonized. 1607 to 1735 the 13 colonies were settled ◇ In France Louix XIV had become King 1643-he was known as the Sun King and moved into Versailles. ◇ Louis XIV dies in 1715 and Louis XV who brings the Rococo style comes to the throne.
  22. 22. Baroque
  23. 23. French Comparison French Louis XIII
  24. 24. Baroque VALUE ALERT: ◇ Because the Late Baroque pieces are trending… that means these heavier pieces are under priced. ◇ You can find a huge cabinet for relatively nothing compared to what they use to cost. ◇ While difficult to place due to size you can get a great value compared to what they were 15 years ago. ◇ For example, 3K today compared 15-20K 15 years ago. Now is the time to buy.
  25. 25. Baroque
  26. 26. Baroque
  27. 27. Baroque
  28. 28. Late Baroque Baroque 1650 – 1750 ◇ In the beginning of the 18th century it got a new stylish character called late Baroque (1720 - 1750). ◇ This is a transitional style with it’s very own distinguished expression. ◇ Austere and slender with sparse decorations – between Baroque and Rococo. ◇ A relief from the Baroque dark and heavy furniture and It’s these painted late Baroque pieces that we appreciate the most from the Baroque period.
  29. 29. Late Baroque
  30. 30. Late Baroque
  31. 31. Late Baroque
  32. 32. Baroque
  33. 33. Rococo 1750 - 1775 ◇The furniture from the Rococo period in Sweden is one of our favorite styles with it’s sophistication and sensitive gently curved lines. ◇ Despite being already popular in France since about 1720's Rococo took several decades before it emerged in Sweden. ◇ It was only after 1750 that the style took hold of the conservative craftsmen in the country. ◇ Its elegant and graceful "S" curve lines made the furniture light and playful. ◇ It was a relief from the Baroque dark and heavy furniture. Rococo
  34. 34. Historical Context ◇ Let’s put this in perspective…. What else was happening in the world at this time? ◇ The American Revolution was taking place from 1765 to 1783 ◇ Declaration of Independence signed July 4, 1776 ◇ Louis XV came to power in France is 1710-1774
  35. 35. Rococo
  36. 36. Rococo 6 DIFFERENT ROCOCO CHAIRS 1750 TO 1775
  37. 37. Rococo Did you know clocks have gender?
  38. 38. Rococo
  39. 39. Rococo
  40. 40. Rococo
  41. 41. Rococo
  42. 42. Rococo
  43. 43. Rococo
  44. 44. Rococo
  45. 45. Rococo
  46. 46. Rococo
  47. 47. Rococo
  48. 48. Rococo
  49. 49. Rococo 1750 - 1775 ◇One doesn’t hink of Black painted pieces in Swedish antiques. ◇Black pieces were however popular during the 18th century ◇`Particulaly popular on desks and writing tables. ◇For Modern Antiques Black helps to define and silhouette the architectural qualities of the piece and lends a "masculinity" without being heavy. Rococo
  50. 50. ◇ This Black Rococo desk is a fabulous example of the Swedish interpretation of the rococo style. ◇ Sensitive - gently curved lines to the legs and apron - sparse on the carvings and yet elegant. ◇ Its sophistication and simple lines, combine to make pieces like this work well in a wide variety of spaces and mix perfectly with modern furniture and in contemporary as well as traditional spaces. Rococo
  51. 51. Gustavian Period 1775 - 1810 (Late Gustavian 1790 - 1810) The extremely elegant interior styles of the Swedish manor houses during the late 18th century - beginning 19th century has long been associated with Gustav the third person and come to bear his name. Admittedly the King's enthusiasm for the new style made it known but it actually begun to take shape about 10 years before his enthronement. It was a harmonious blend of rococo lightness and a new taste for the classisism, the forms became straighter and more symmetrical. Gustavian
  52. 52. ◇ King Gustav had a strong feeling for the fine art music and architecture. ◇ He visited Louis XVI in France and saw the wonders that were happening in Versailles and inspired by the work sent his own craftsmen to learn in France. ◇ He traveled to Italy where he visited the excavations in the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum he was heavily influenced by antiquity ideals. ◇ Back home in Sweden he hired the best-known contemporary architects and designers for its castles and got to give the beloved style its name. Gustavian
  53. 53. ◇This Gustavian cabinet is a fabulous example. ◇ Its sophistication simple lines and delightful pale colour makes a piece like this work well in a wide variety of spaces and mix perfectly with modern furniture. ◇It’s so easy to live with them and they go well with everything. This fact makes them extremely attractive. ◇You can open any interior magazine anywhere in the world and you are certain to find a Gustavian piece highlighting a room. Gustavian
  54. 54. ◇The Gustavian expression is typically Swedish: straight and simple with sparse decor. ◇The painted furniture is often made of native woods and painted mainly in pale white blue yellow and red colours. ◇Even with wear and tear over centuries they show strength and charm. ◇Swedish furniture was built in strong, dense pine that was allowed to grow slow and We do have to be grateful to the nordic climate for preserving our heritage. Gustavian
  55. 55. Original Paint ◇ Authentic examples with original paintwork are the most popular and have become increasingly rare. ◇ The demand is continuously growing and consequently so are prices. ◇ Investing in such pieces will be rewarding in many ways but it is fundamental to keep in mind that with Swedish painted furniture, the market prizes original, not new, paintwork. ◇ Swedish furniture was often painted to imitate the grain and character of a variety of exotic woods, like Mahogany, which had to be imported and therefore reserved just for an elite, mostly around the Stockholm area. Original Paint
  56. 56. Original Paint ◇This technique simultaneously brings to life a new piece with its own individual appeal, texture and integrity. It is an absolutely magical process. ◇But there is also a great risk for us dealers buying, we never know how much of the original paint that is left under the layers of later paint. All this results in different types of conditions. ◇The general rule is that good original colour demands higher prices.
  57. 57. Original Paint 1. Original piece that has been kept and never overpainted. 2. The dry scraped pieces where we manage to keep as much of the original paint possible with some retouches. 3. The pieces that unfortunately doesn’t keep much of the original paint and these pieces are sometimes professionally retouched in the same colour palette as the original. 4. Lastly we have the pieces that has lost all of their original colour and these pieces are often completely repainted.
  58. 58. Gustavian
  59. 59. Gustavian
  60. 60. Gustavian
  61. 61. Gustavian
  62. 62. Gustavian
  63. 63. Gustavian
  64. 64. Gustavian
  65. 65. Gustavian
  66. 66. Gustavian
  67. 67. Gustavian
  68. 68. Gustavian
  69. 69. Gustavian
  70. 70. Gustavian
  71. 71. Gustavian
  72. 72. Gustavian
  73. 73. Gustavian
  74. 74. Gustavian
  75. 75. Gustavian
  76. 76. Gustavian
  77. 77. Gustavian
  78. 78. Gustavian
  79. 79. Gustavian
  80. 80. Gustavian
  81. 81. Gustavian
  82. 82. Gustavian
  83. 83. Gustavian
  84. 84. Gustavian
  85. 85. ◇Transitional pieces testify a moment in furniture history – a moment between two furniture periods. ◇ An example of Transitional pieces are the pieces we discussed from the end of the Baroque period known as Late Baroque. ◇Transitional style has its very own distinguished expression. ◇Austere and slender with sparse decorations - between baroque and rococo. Transitional
  86. 86. Transitional
  87. 87. Transitional
  88. 88. Transitional
  89. 89. Transitional
  90. 90. Transitional
  91. 91. Transitional
  92. 92. ◇ Much of the Swedish furniture currently available on the "antique" market has been comprehensively rebuilt and restored, often repainted in popular pale colours and sadly some of these created or "style" pieces are sold as period. ◇ It is paramount to pay attention and look closely. ◇ During the 80’s and 90’s a lot of furniture with original color was unfortunately destroyed by chemicals. Fakes
  93. 93. Fakes Antique Swedish Gustavian Style painted four-door sideboard with four diamond shaped doors and drawers with lambs tongue moulding beneath top, one interior shelf. The paint has been refreshed in traditional distressed Gustavian white. Original hinges and locks.
  94. 94. A stunning Baroque bureau with an outstanding antique patina. Original locks keys hardware and cast iron lift handles. Swedish circa 1840. Fakes
  95. 95. ◇ When buying online my first tip would be to pay attention to the description of the piece. ◇ Period antiques are pieces that were made during the time that the design originated whereas pieces made later to resemble those from the prior time are classified as "style" pieces. ◇ Gustavian period furniture we know they were only made in the late 18th century to early 19th century in Sweden. (1775 to 1810) Period vs Style
  96. 96. In 1846 the guild system dissolved in Sweden and the carpenter's strict quality controls ceased. Cabinetmakers were now able to freely practice their craft. During the second half of the 19th century it became more common with machine-made parts and the handmade furniture decreased most significantly and unfortunately so did the quality. In conclusion: Pieces that look Gustavian but where made one or two hundred years later or even last year are properly designated in the Gustavian style or reproductions.

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