Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The average house fire temperature and you!

10,210 views

Published on

A fire person/fighter knows the inside of house more than anyone and huge temperature of fight fires. What the average person is not focusing on is the RISK for not planning or preventing fires.

Published in: Education
  • What if you had a printing press that could spit out hundred dollar bills on demand? Do you think that would change your life? ▲▲▲ http://t.cn/AisJWCv6
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I discovered the 60-sec Habit that reversed my type 2 diabetes and melted away 56lbs of fat and discovered the real cause of diabetes... ■■■ https://tinyurl.com/y2956vb5
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Dating for everyone is here: ❶❶❶ http://bit.ly/2F4cEJi ❶❶❶
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Follow the link, new dating source: ❤❤❤ http://bit.ly/2F4cEJi ❤❤❤
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Get Paid $25 per hour to watch YouTube videos ▲▲▲ http://ishbv.com/socialpaid/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

The average house fire temperature and you!

  1. 1. The average house (one like yours and mine) fire burns at a temperature of about 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit,which isn't hot enough to destroy most metals and earthly-made substances. And if an item is well-placed and small in size, its chances of survival increase drastically. In typical temperatures of flames, the "adiabatic flame temperature" of a given fuel and oxidizer pair indicates the temperature at which the gases achieve stable combustion. Smoldering cigarette: Temperature without drawing: side of the lit portion; 400 °C (750 °F); middle of the lit portion: 585 °C (1,100 °F). Although paper ignites at around 480 degrees Fahrenheit, it gets far hotter once it's burning. The temperature at the center of a paper fire is 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit, give or take a couple hundred. The tips of the flames themselves are usually between 600 and 800 degrees. Adiabatic flame temperature: The constant volume adiabatic flame temperature is the temperature that results from a complete combustion process that occurs without any work, heat transfer or changes in kinetic or potential energy. As air is heated it expands becoming less dense, and as a result, lighter. Because it is lighter, it rises upwards above the cooler air. ... As a result, the temperature of these air molecules drops, despite the fact that no heat has been removed from them. This process is referred to as adiabatic cooling. Most folk treat FIRE SAFETY at home like a TV commercial, seen that or bought that, change the channel. So as you think about brushing off fire safety at home, think TEMPERATURE and how fast heat will blister your skin or burn your lungs or take your home or family away. HAVE YOU REALLY PRACTICED YOUR HOME FIRE DRILLS AND THOUGHT ABOUT FIRE SAFETY TO DAY, long before it is way too late! A burn is damage to your skin caused by a temperature as low as 44 degrees Celsius(109.4 Fahrenheit) for a long time. A high temperature (more than 80 degrees Celsius) can cause more severe burns in a very short period of time (less than a second). WHAT ARE YOU LOSING THROUGH BURNED SKIN ? You will lose water and salts as well as proteins, vitamins, minerals. If you have a
  2. 2. small burn, your body can cope with the fluid loss from the damaged area. This is not often true in elderly people with burns. If a baby or child sustains burns larger than 1/10 (10%) of his/her total skin surface, the fluid loss will be considerable and the body cannot cope by itself. Firstly, the child may feel thirsty and later on he/she will weep less. His/her body will need more fluids. Water with sugar and salts will be given to the child through a drip for the first 24 hours after the injury. The child will require admission to a Burn Unit. If an adult presents with burns larger than 15% of the total skin surface, fluid loss will be considerable and admission to a Burn Unit is required. In a short period of time (hours), the body will lose fluids faster than replacement by drinking. Water with salts will be given through a drip in order to compensate for the loss. The amount of fluid required depends on the size of the person and the extent of the burn. It may be a lot: for example for an 11 stones (70Kg) man with a 40% burns, the fluid requirement will be more than 11 litres in the first 24 hours. Human Lungs in Fire The smoke released by any type of fire (forest, brush, crop, structure, tires, waste or wood burning) is a mixture of particles and chemicals produced by incomplete burning of carbon-containing materials. All smoke contains carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter (PM or soot). Smoke can contain many different chemicals, including aldehydes, acid gases, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, toluene, styrene, metals and dioxins. The type and amount of particles and chemicals in smoke varies depending on what is burning, how much oxygen is available, and the burn temperature. Inhaling smoke for a short time can cause immediate (acute) effects. Smoke is irritating to the eyes, nose, and throat, and its odor may be nauseating. Studies have shown that some people exposed to heavy smoke have temporary changes in lung function, which makes breathing more difficult. Two of the major agents in smoke that can cause health effects are carbon monoxide gas and very small particles (fine particles, or PM2.5 ). These particles are two and one half (2.5) microns or less in size (25,400 microns equal an inch) and individual particles are too small to be seen with the naked eye.
  3. 3. Inhaling carbon monoxide decreases the body's oxygen supply. This can cause headaches, reduce alertness, and aggravate a heart condition known as angina. Fine particles are able to travel deeply into the respiratory tract, reaching the lungs. Inhaling fine particles can cause a variety of health effects, including respiratory irritation and shortness of breath, and can worsen medical conditions such as asthma and heart disease. During increased physical exertion, cardiovascular effects can be worsened by exposure to carbon monoxide and particulate matter. Once exposure stops, symptoms from inhaling carbon monoxide or fine particles generally diminish, but may last for a couple of days. Suffering a house fire is a devastating experience. Each year, $8.6 billion in property loss is estimated due to fires based upon government records. When the damage is severe, countless precious belongings are lost, depriving the owners of a portion of their lives. Jewelry Although they may endure superficial damage when they’re engulfed by flames, most items of jewelry maintain their compositions amid high heat. Diamonds, which are formed below earth’s surface under intense heat and pressure, melt at about 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Gold melts at a much cooler temperature – about 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit – but that’s enough to survive most house fires. Platinum jewelry is the priciest, so it’s a good thing that the metal’s melting point is just higher than 3,200 degrees Fahrenheit. Sapphire and Ruby also possess extremely high melting points. Silver Coins The melting point of silver is just below 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit. Filing Cabinets Steel filing cabinets are built to last so that businesses won’t have to deal with the loss of important files after building fires. Many people keep personal documents in filing cabinets, which are often kept in home offices. Their steel composition and usual placement within a home – often away from the kitchen or fireplace – give them a high survival rate. Tools Do-it-yourselfers might not have to repurchase the tools they’ll need to rebuild their homes after a fire. Steel tools are extremely durable – the melting point of carbon steel is between 2,600 and 2,800 degrees Fahrenheit, and the melting point of stainless steel is roughly 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. 4. Silverware Most forks, knives and spoons are composed of stainless steel. So even if the fire started in the kitchen, it’s possible that not every item in the room perished. Their small size and placement also allows them to take the heat. Cookware Cookware is built to endure extremely high temperatures. Most pots and pans are made of steel and iron; the latter of which melts at just below 2,800 degrees Fahrenheit. Like silverware, their placement within confined spaces helps them survive the not-so-severe fires. Barbecue Grill Go figure that an item made for fireside cooking could outlast a fire. Most grills are composed of steel or iron, which allows them to last for decades. Of course, most are kept in the backyard – away from the worst of the inferno. But they still may have to endure falling debris. Fire safe The steel composition of a fire safe allows it endure 1,700 degree infernos. Imagine if the entire house was made from the same material as a fire safe? House fire problem solved. SO LET ME ASK YOU ONE MORE TIME BEFORE YOU HOUSE PUTS YOU AND YOUR FAMILY TO THE TEMPERATURE TESTS HOW IS THAT FIRE SAFETY PLAN! A house fire is one of my greatest fears when it comes to my family, and especially my young son. Fire is powerful and uncontrollable, and absolutely deadly. Just thinking about it sets off waves of panic – but not of uncertainty. Anyone who has lived through a fire will tell you how terrifying it is. Sadly, sometimes people don’t live to talk about it. We know, because we see the tragic results of fire every day. Often the victims of fire need not have perished. They did because they did not react quickly enough or because they were not alerted in time to escape. Smoke alarms alert you and are required by law on every storey of your home. Although schools conduct regular fire drills, most fatal fires happen at home. It is critical to develop an effective home fire safety plan and practice it regularly. This will ensure that if a fire happens, everyone will know exactly what to do. In more cases than we’d like to remember help or escape was on the other side of a door, or at the opposite end of a corridor. Lives were lost because people either didn’t know or couldn’t find their way out of a burning building. Window Safety You know that your doors open and shut normally, but you need to do regular checks of your windows – a primary escape route in case of fire. Many elements, like
  5. 5. humidity or a recent repaint, may make it hard (or nearly impossible) to open your windows. Do a regular check (once a month works over here) to verify your window situation. Escape Ladder If your kids sleep on an upper level, you need to get a roll-up escape ladder for their room(s). Even more, you need to practice climbing down the ladder. Unless your kid’s a daredevil, she or he probably be scared to climb down a swinging, unfamiliar rope ladder – especially if she’s already panicking about a house fire. Drilling her climbing skills in advance will help her stay calm and safe as she descends to safety during an emergency. Prepare a fire escape plan with your children Double Escape Route As you work up your fire evacuation plan, you need to develop at least two safe routes out of your home: one primary and one alternative, in case the primary is unsafe. Note that the primary route from your bedroom is probably different than the preferred evacuation from your kids’ rooms. Don’t confuse your children with options; instead, only focus on their individual plans. If they’re on the younger side, do an arts & crafts project to create an escape route diagram. Their fire plan should live in their bedroom, somewhere they can easily grab during a fire. Twin Meeting Spots The final element to your evacuation route is your outdoor meeting spot. You’re going to need two again, in case your preferred location is unsafe. This area can be anywhere on your property – the front sidewalk is good, for example, because that’s where the fire trucks will arrive – but you can also choose a trusted neighbor’s home. Whatever works for your circumstances and family. Basic Supplies Finally, arm your family with these basic fire safety supplies:  Flashlights: One per bedroom and at least one per floor
  6. 6.  Towels: One set per bedroom, to prevent smoke from seeping in under doors and windows  Cotton Shirt/Blanket: One per person, in the bedroom, to cover your nose and mouth to prevent smoke inhalation  Bright Cloth: One per bedroom, to wave so the fire department can spot you easily  Smoke Detectors: One per bedroom and at least one per floor  Fire Extinguisher: At least one per floor Plan to Live: Each member of the household should become familiar with the methods of escape, and take part in regular fire drills. Fire safety and escape planning is a family affair. Pre-arrange a meeting place a safe distance away from the building so you can make sure everyone is accounted for. Make sure family members, overnight guests and babysitters are familiar with you home escape plan. You may wish to post the escape plan where it will be seen by everyone (ie. on the fridge). Have an alternate plan. The main escape route may become impassable because of smoke or fire. Decide in advance who will assist the very young, the elderly or the infirm in the event of an emergency. Conduct regular fire drills. Have family members practice escaping ‘blind’ from every area of the house. Install extra alarms if necessary – in bedrooms where doors are kept closed or for persons who are hard of hearing. Be sure everyone in the household knows how to dial 911 and report a fire as soon as they are safely out of the house or apartment.

×