The Different Forms of Translation

662 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
662
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Different Forms of Translation

  1. 1. DIFFERENT FORMS OF TRANSLATION HOW TRANSLATION VARIES ACROSS FIELDS AND GENRES
  2. 2. THERE ARE DIFFERENT KINDS? • If it’s news to you that there are different kinds of translation, don’t worry, you’re not alone. • All kinds of translation are similar because they perform the same function. • Levels of scrutiny, interpretation and correctness vary according to a translation’s associated field.
  3. 3. TECHNICAL TRANSLATION • Technical writing, and by extension its translation, requires a vast background knowledge to give the intended message to readers. • Technical translation requires a vast level of background knowledge, like patent translation. • Translators have to stay close to the original meaning of the document, but they may have to reword to get that meaning across in the language that they are translating into.
  4. 4. TECHNICAL TRANSLATION Example of technical translation: A set of instructions for how to build a LEGO building should be difficult to misinterpret. Some technical language will be used to describe the process of building the LEGO masterpiece, and the translation of it will need to be equally technical. The translation may not be literal, but it will convey equally well which piece goes where.
  5. 5. INTERNATIONAL PATENT TRANSLATION • International patent translation requires an interpreter with technical expertise and native lingual experience. • Mistranslation of a patent can cause problems in legal protection of the patent. • Terminology is key to having a correct patent translation.
  6. 6. INTERNATIONAL PATENT TRANSLATION Example of patent translation: If a software company is looking to receive a patent for a very specific function of the software they use (i.e. GPS tracking), then they have to make sure that the interpretation of GPS will working in other languages. Character-based languages will have more of a difficulty with translating an acronym.
  7. 7. LOCALIZATION • Localization often goes hand-in-hand with technical translation, but is more specialized than that. • Localization is the step beyond initial translation, making the material understandable to different dialects and cultures. • Terminology can be different among different speakers of the same language. • This process depends a little more on physical location.
  8. 8. LOCALIZATION GRAY vs GREY . “Grey” is the typical British spelling, while “gray” is the typical American spelling. An example of localization: British English, American English, and Australian English are all different dialects of the same language and would require slightly different translations in order for them to work the best in each place.
  9. 9. MACHINE TRANSLATION • When a machine translates you lose some things: • The translation becomes very literal • The machine can’t match current lingual trends, only past ones • Machines can’t adapt to fluidity of language • Lower priority items that don’t require the BEST interpretation can be translated.
  10. 10. TRANSLATING FICTION • Fiction requires that the translator first interpret what’s happening in the work. • It may not be as obvious what the meaning is. The words can be interpreted literally, but then the meaning may change. • There must be a balance between the author’s intent and staying close to the actual text.
  11. 11. TRANSLATING POETRY • Poetry is even more difficult to translate than fiction, thanks to its reliance on language. • Poetry uses devices like rhyme, meter, and rhythm to support its meaning. • Taking away the original language may completely change the poem. • Translating into another language can reveal different layers of meaning in the poem.
  12. 12. INTERPRETATIONS • All translation involves making interpretations of the language that is there and making it understandable in another language. • Read this article for more information about the different kinds of translation. • To know more about international patent translation, read this article.

×