Relationship with family, peers, and adult

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Relationship with family, peers, and adult

  1. 1. RELATIONSHIP WITH FAMILY, PEERS, AND ADULT SOCIETY
  2. 2. Adolescent Rebellion • Pattern of emotional turmoil characteristic of a minority of adolescents that may involve conflict with family, alienation from adult society, reckless behaviour, and rejection of adult values. • Contrary to popular belief, most adolescents are not ticking time bombs. Those raised in homes with a positive family atmosphere tend to come through adolescence with no serious problems.
  3. 3. Changing Time Use and Changing Relationships • One way to measure changes in adolescents’ relationship with the important people in their lives is to see how they spend their discretionary time. • Cultural Variations in time use reflect varying cultural needs, values, and practices. • Ethnicity may affect family connectedness
  4. 4. Adolescents and Parents • Relationships with parents during adolescence – the degree of conflict and openness of communication – are grounded largely in the emotional closeness developed in childhood; and adolescent relationships with parents, in turn, set the stage for the quality of the relationship with a partner in adulthood.
  5. 5. •Individuation and Family Conflict Individuation Individuation - Adolescents struggle for autonomy and personal identity. - The process of forming a stable personality. As a person individuates, he gains a clearer sense of self that is separate from parents and others around him.
  6. 6. Adolescents and Siblings
  7. 7. Adolescent and Peers • Adolescents spend more time with peers. Although 1-to-1 friendships still continue, cliques – structured groups of friends who do things together – become more important. • A larger type of grouping, the crowd, is not based on personal interactions but on reputation, image, or identity. Crowd membership is a social construction, a set of labels by which young people divide the social map based on neighborhood, ethnicity, socio-economic status or factors.
  8. 8. The Crowd: The IT crowd (“IT” or Mean Girls) The Nerds The Stoners
  9. 9. Romantic Relationships • Romantic Relationships are a central part of most adolescents’ social worlds. It tends to become more intense and more intimate across adolescence. • Early adolescents think primarily about how a romantic relationship may affect their status in a peer group. • Middle adolescents have at least one exclusive partner lasting for several months or a year and the effect of the choice of partner on peer status tends to become less important • In late adolescence, romantic relationships begin to serve the full gamut of emotional needs that such relationships can serve and then only in relatively long-term relationships.

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