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W2
Test Techniques
5/1/2013 11:30:00 AM

The Test Coverage Outline: Your
Testing Road Map
Presented by:
Paul Holland
Testi...
Paul Holland
An independent software test consultant and teacher, Paul Holland has more than sixteen years of handson test...
Product Coverage Outlines
and How to Use Them
Paul Holland
Test Consultant and Teacher
at Testing Thoughts

My Background
...
Attributions
• Many of the concepts that I am presenting
come from the Rapid Software Testing
class developed by James Bac...
An Alternative
• Each feature/product is different from other
features/products
• Start with “raw” project specific inform...
Benefits of a PCO
• Helps eliminate tunnel vision
• Will help display your thoroughness to others
– Help you gain respect
...
Product Coverage Outline
• Take a tour of the feature/product
– Investigate every menu item
– List sub-menus
– Context spe...
Product Coverage Outline
• Consider the following (SFDIPOT):
– Structure of the program (smallest components)
– Functional...
Risk List
• Create a list of project specific risks
• These are in addition to “generic” risks
• Talk with designers, busi...
3 Raw Lists: Now What?
• Use these three lists as the starting point
for your test strategy
• Get agreement from stakehold...
3 Raw Lists: Traditional
• Create your list of Test Cases (shudder)
• If you must create scripted test cases,
using these ...
April, 2013

©2013 Testing Thoughts

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The Test Coverage Outline: Your Testing Road Map

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To assist in risk analysis, prioritization of testing, and test reporting (telling your testing story), you need a thorough Test Coverage Outline (TCO)—a road map of your proposed testing activities. By creating a TCO, you can prepare for testing without having to create a giant pile of detailed test cases. Paul Holland says that a comprehensive TCO helps the test team to get buy-in for the overall test strategy very early in the project and is valuable for identifying risk areas, testability issues, and resource constraints. Paul describes how to create a TCO including the use of heuristic-based checklists to help ensure you don’t overlook important elements in your testing. Learn multiple approaches for critical information gathering, the artifacts used as input for creating a TCO, and how you can use a TCO to maintain testing focus. Take back a new, lightweight tool to help you tell the testing story throughout your project.

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The Test Coverage Outline: Your Testing Road Map

  1. 1. W2 Test Techniques 5/1/2013 11:30:00 AM The Test Coverage Outline: Your Testing Road Map Presented by: Paul Holland Testing Thoughts Brought to you by: 340 Corporate Way, Suite 300, Orange Park, FL 32073 888-268-8770 ∙ 904-278-0524 ∙ sqeinfo@sqe.com ∙ www.sqe.com
  2. 2. Paul Holland An independent software test consultant and teacher, Paul Holland has more than sixteen years of handson testing and test management experience, primarily at Alcatel-Lucent where he led a transformation of the testing approach for two product divisions, making them more efficient and effective. As a test manager and tester, Paul focused on exploratory testing, test automation, and improving testing techniques. For the past five years, he has been consulting and delivering training within Alcatel-Lucent and externally to companies such as Intel, Intuit, Progressive Insurance, HP, RIM, and General Dynamics. Paul teaches the Rapid Software Testing course for Satisfice. For more information visit www.testingthoughts.com.
  3. 3. Product Coverage Outlines and How to Use Them Paul Holland Test Consultant and Teacher at Testing Thoughts My Background • Independent S/W Testing consultant since Apr 2012 • 16+ years testing telecommunications equipment and reworking test methodologies at Alcatel-Lucent • 10+ years as a test manager • Presenter at, STAREast, STARWest, Let’s Test, CAST, STARCanada, and EuroStar • Keynote at KWSQA conference in 2012 • Facilitator at 25+ peer conferences and workshops • Teacher of S/W testing for the past 5 years • Teacher of Rapid Software Testing – through Satisfice (James Bach): www.satisfice.com • Military Helicopter pilot – Canadian Sea Kings April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 2 1
  4. 4. Attributions • Many of the concepts that I am presenting come from the Rapid Software Testing class developed by James Bach and Michael Bolton April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 3 Test Strategy Development • A Test Strategy is often developed by: – Following a template – Envisioning the entire product as a whole – Using elements from previous features/products – Using estimates from the past – Some use development estimates of complexity and effort to determine test effort April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 4 2
  5. 5. An Alternative • Each feature/product is different from other features/products • Start with “raw” project specific information: – Detailed description of the elements of the feature/product – Identify specific risks related to the project – Develop a list of “test ideas” April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 5 Product Coverage Outline • A Product Coverage Outline can be described as: – A parts list – An inventory of elements – Components of a product • Essentially a list of items of a project that can be tested in some way April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 6 3
  6. 6. Benefits of a PCO • Helps eliminate tunnel vision • Will help display your thoroughness to others – Help you gain respect • Will allow you to get “buy-in” at a high level of what you are going to consider when testing • Helps prioritize your testing • Helps in reporting April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 7 Product Coverage Outline How to create a PCO April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 8 4
  7. 7. Product Coverage Outline • Take a tour of the feature/product – Investigate every menu item – List sub-menus – Context specific items – Text boxes – Radio buttons / Check boxes – Visual elements (pictures, background, logos) – Pop-up boxes April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 9 Product Coverage Outline • Talk with designers, business people, customers, customer service, etc. • Look at previous versions • Look at marketing information • Read the functional specification document (*although, I would do this later – seriously) April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 10 5
  8. 8. Product Coverage Outline • Consider the following (SFDIPOT): – Structure of the program (smallest components) – Functionality (individual features) – Data (I/O, create, store, manipulate, backup, – Interface (User interfaces, APIs, ) ) – Platform (Computer, CPU, OS, browser, ) – Operations (How is it used by customers) – Timings (Race conds, time of day/wk/mth/yr, ) (Taken from the Rapid Software Testing Course, Bach and Bolton) April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 11 Product Coverage Outline • As you are investigating the feature/product – Create a list of ALL the elements that MAY need to be tested in some way • Make a mind map (I use XMind) • Enter the elements into Excel (or a word processor) • Create a list on paper, flip chart, or whiteboard • Make a bunch of sticky notes (I would encourage electronic versions for ease of sharing and re-use – but it is not mandatory) April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 12 6
  9. 9. Risk List • Create a list of project specific risks • These are in addition to “generic” risks • Talk with designers, business managers, customers, customer support, etc. • Try to identify risks during the creation of the Product Coverage Outline April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 13 Test Ideas • This is NOT a list of specific test charters • List ways to test that you came across during investigation. For example: – Overflow input buffers – Check interop between two components – Verify information in text boxes/help screens – Modify values, change all values from default (These are only a very small set of examples) April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 14 7
  10. 10. 3 Raw Lists: Now What? • Use these three lists as the starting point for your test strategy • Get agreement from stakeholders of the components and their importance • They are important in “traditional” testing environments as well as for agile teams April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 15 3 Raw Lists: agile testing Use these 3 lists to: • Create your list of Charters – Combine the test ideas, risks and components to create specific charters – Add “test ideas” under each Charter • Help with the initial prioritization • Assist in creation of new Charters during testing • Help generate a better definition of done April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 16 8
  11. 11. 3 Raw Lists: Traditional • Create your list of Test Cases (shudder) • If you must create scripted test cases, using these three lists will help: – Give you better coverage (not just using the requirements) – Reduce rework (because you toured SUT) – Prioritize the test cases for execution and reuse April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 17 Hands on Creation of a PCO for a simple program • Lego MindstormsTM robot which changes behavior depending on “sensed” color • A Flash program that simulates the robot • Generation of a PCO for the robot • How would PCO differ for the Flash simulation? April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 18 9
  12. 12. April, 2013 ©2013 Testing Thoughts 19 10

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