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Spectrum Needs for Utilities to
enable Smart Grid Developments
Dr Peter D. Couch
CEO of JRC
Utility Communications
The Changing Context
Distribution Automation
Need to transition from a static distribution network ...
Utility Communications
The Critical Components
Teleprotection
Protection relays communicate with each other between substa...
Establishing the requirements
EUTC – Generic Requirements per DNO
Service Description
Priority or
criticality
Type of
serv...
The Netherlands - Alliander’s Approach
Spectrum in 450–470 MHz utilising CDMA to support Smart Grid
In addition the Water ...
Spectrum
European Utility use of spectrum in 450-470 MHz
Spectrum
3GPP band plans for 450 – 470 MHz
Developments in Ireland
ComReg Condoc. 1767, proposed release of 410-415.5 & 420-425.5 MHz
Summary of approach
• Potential...
Market Dynamic is Changing Rapidly
Forecasts Underestimate Demand / Supply Side Developments
“The EV revolution is going t...
Joint Radio Company: Making the spectrum and technology work for your business www.JRC.co.uk
Questions?
peter.couch@jrc.co...
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Spectrum Requirements for Utilities

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Presentations from the UK SPF Cluster 2: Public Sector Spectrum Release (PSSR) - Utilities and 5G

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Spectrum Requirements for Utilities

  1. 1. Spectrum Needs for Utilities to enable Smart Grid Developments Dr Peter D. Couch CEO of JRC
  2. 2. Utility Communications The Changing Context Distribution Automation Need to transition from a static distribution network operation to a system that supports dynamic operation of the power system for higher asset utilisation and a more reliable service. As technologies evolve, intelligence will be pushed further into the field requiring devices to have the ability to make decisions and communicate with other devices; Distributed Energy Resources The transition to a bi-directional system to enable the utilisation of distributed energy resources closer to the loads will provide a new set of solutions to ensuring network reliability and addressing cost of supply whilst posing the challenge of greater complexity in terms of network control and protection; Response Efficiency The service need is changing from a reaction-oriented system to an anticipatory system where the utility’s automation technologies and workforce have greater awareness of network performance trends and issues ahead of events. Customer Communications Enabling in-premise energy management and interconnecting customer assets to the grid, e.g. solar, backup generation, Electric Vehicles, etc.
  3. 3. Utility Communications The Critical Components Teleprotection Protection relays communicate with each other between substations to monitor and respond to faults. When a fault is detected a control signal is sent to trip a circuit breaker. Teleprotection is a very critical application requiring very short communication delays (about 10ms). SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) Communications between the remote terminal units (RTUs) or Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) deployed in a substation with the Master Control / Data & Control Centre. Utility Voice Enables operational voice traffic to field offices and mobile work force. Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Deployment of CCTV at substations with the capacity for local storage as well as streamed to the Control Centre as necessary, e.g. during a security incident. The video will be encoded for security purposes Management Enables Field Force to access centrally held data and information and allows monitoring / control of operational telecoms capability Smart Grid requires expansion of comms capability to MV & LV layers
  4. 4. Establishing the requirements EUTC – Generic Requirements per DNO Service Description Priority or criticality Type of service coverage predicted volume in 2020 predicted volume in 2030 data rate required data volume latency availability PROTECTION ClassA: Unit Protection (over 100kV) Connection between protection devices at either end of a transmission line high pt-pt main routes 10 15 continuous 5ms 0.9999 ClassB: Distance protection (over 100kV) fast overcurrent protection on long transmission lines high area specified sites 25 50 1 kbyte 5ms 0.9999 ClassC: Blocking signals (over 100kV) Broadcast signal from a protection relay detecting a fault to delay the operation of adjacent protection relays high pt-pt main routes 30 60 continuous 5ms 0.9999 ClassD: protection for circuits of less than 100kV Protection equipment for medium voltage equipment high pt-pt main routes 100 200 continuous 10ms 0.9999 ClassE: remote access to protection relays remote configuration of protection relays from control centre medium pt-pt specified sites 50 100 1 Mbyte 1s 0.9 SCADA ClassA: Grid level substations (more than 100kV) Monitoring and control of devices at transmission substations high pt-pt main routes 20 20 64 kbits/s 1 kbyte 100ms 0.9999 ClassB: Primary Distribution level substations (transforming from above 100kV to below 100kV) Monitoring and control of devices at primary distribution substations high pt-pt all routes 500 500 64 kbits/s 100ms 0.9999 ClassC: Distribution substations below 100kV Monitoring and control of devices at secondary distribution substations high pt-multipt 100% of utility service area 20000 20000 64 kbits/s 1s 0.9999 ClassD: distribution automation Monitoring and control of devices at substations with the possibility of autonomous actions low mesh 5000 10000 8 kbits/s 1s 99% ClassE: major generation sites (more than 100MW) Monitoring and control for remote connection and disconnection of generation plant high pt-pt specified sites 12 13 64 kbits/s 100ms 0.9999 ClassF: medium size generation sites (100MW down to 1 MW) Monitoring and control for remote connection and disconnection of generation plant medium pt-pt 30 35 64 kbits/s 1s 0.9999 ClassG: small size generation sites (less than 1MW) Monitoring and control for remote connection and disconnection of generation plant low pt-pt 150 200 8 kbits/s 10s 99% ClassH: Smart Grid Hub Allows monitoring and control of local distribution points in response to changes in local supply and demand medium pt-pt 100% of utility service area 5000 6000 64 kbits/s 1s 99.9% ClassI: Smart Grid concentrator Allows collection of local demand and supply data low mesh 50000 60000 10 kbits/s 10s 99% ClassJ: data recorders allows data from various event recorders (temperature, wind speed, etc ) to be downloaded low pt-multipt specified sites 2500 3000 64 kbits/s 1 Mbyte 1 min 99% 64 kbits/s
  5. 5. The Netherlands - Alliander’s Approach Spectrum in 450–470 MHz utilising CDMA to support Smart Grid In addition the Water Networks are also supported
  6. 6. Spectrum European Utility use of spectrum in 450-470 MHz
  7. 7. Spectrum 3GPP band plans for 450 – 470 MHz
  8. 8. Developments in Ireland ComReg Condoc. 1767, proposed release of 410-415.5 & 420-425.5 MHz Summary of approach • Potential uses of the band identified as “smart grid,” “smart Metering,” “PPDR, “ ”DMR/TETRA Enhanced Data Services”. Dismissed all except “SMART GRID” • Amount of spectrum consistent with that being utilised in 450 – 470 MHz range across Europe with traditional Duplex arrangement. • Seeking comment on block sizes to be released • Maximum transmit power for Telemetry applications of 50W EIRP. • Seek views on allocation process, predisposed to auction release but with only one credible use and no excess demand an administrative approach would likely be most efficient. • Also seeking input on licence term and spectrum fees.
  9. 9. Market Dynamic is Changing Rapidly Forecasts Underestimate Demand / Supply Side Developments “The EV revolution is going to hit the car market even harder and faster than BNEF predicted a year ago. EVs are on track to accelerate to 54% of new car sales by 2040. Tumbling battery prices mean that EVs will have lower lifetime costs, and will be cheaper to buy, than internal combustion engine (ICE) cars
  10. 10. Joint Radio Company: Making the spectrum and technology work for your business www.JRC.co.uk Questions? peter.couch@jrc.co.uk, 0775 3832828

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