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[THVInstitute13] Promoting Historical Thinking with Placed-Based Learning & Community Interaction

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Presentation given by Alexander Pope at Teaching the Hudson Valley's 2013 Summer Institute, "Placed-Based Learning & Common Core"

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[THVInstitute13] Promoting Historical Thinking with Placed-Based Learning & Community Interaction

  1. 1. Reaching Standards Through Community Resources Alexander Pope, Salisbury University Teaching the Hudson Valley July 30, 2013
  2. 2. Guiding Questions 1. What do the standards say about historical inquiry? 2. Why local history? 3. What are some ideas for investigation in our local areas?
  3. 3. Our Backgrounds • Me: Former museum educator (CO, TX), elementary teacher (NYC), current teacher educator • You: k-12? Museums? Historic sites? What else? • Why do we value historic study? • What does Common Core say?
  4. 4. Q1: What do standards say about historical inquiry? • Mission Statement • The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn... [and] are designed to be robust and relevant ..., reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers.
  5. 5. Common Core Standards are… • Rigorous in content and application of knowledge through high-order skills • Internationally benchmarked • Based on evidence and research • State led • coordinated by NGA Center and CCSSO • Being updated
  6. 6. Suggested Classroom Methods With the exception of Standard #5 (Text Structure) and #10 (Text Complexity) most of you are probably already asking this of your students. Looking for evidence Central Ideas Causation Vocabulary Point of View and Bias Multiple types of Media Fact or Opinion Primary and Secondary Sources
  7. 7. C3 • Preparation for “College, Career, and Civic Life” • Effort to increase attention to social studies / humanities within Common Core • Stresses History, Geography, Economics, Civics/Governme nt • Reflective of history educators’ critiques
  8. 8. “Active and responsible citizen” • Active and responsible citizens identify and analyze public problems; deliberate with other people about how to define and address issues; take constructive, collaborative action; reflect on their actions; create and sustain groups; and influence institutions both large and small.... • ... Individual mastery of content often no longer suffices; students should also develop the capacity to work together to apply knowledge to real problems. Thus, a rich social studies education is an education for college, career, and civic life.
  9. 9. Q2: Why local history? • There is history everywhere • Historic inquiry relates to textual analysis • Asking questions of people, places, and things • Developing narrative • Making connections • Every community has a history
  10. 10. Local history is relevant • “It appears that students better understand the complex interrelationships and connections among individuals, communities, and society when they have the chance to apply their social studies knowledge in real-world settings” (American Institutes for Research, 2005). • Place-based education • Efficient • Effective • Thorough • Greater retention
  11. 11. Local history is rich • School history • Neighborhood development • Demographic changes • Resource use
  12. 12. Local history is scalable • Historic changes, issues, and present conditions in one area may relate to another • Recent example: Hurricane Sandy
  13. 13. Local history is broad • Students asked the question: How did location affect these events? • What is similar/different about the development of these areas? • How did the places use their resources to address the disaster? • What should the places do to prevent another event like this? • Students prepared reports including: • Local experiences (interviews) • Photographic record (document analysis) • News accounts (traditional text analysis) • Research expanded to include Katrina, Rita, and 2004 Sumatran tsunami
  14. 14. Local history offers resources • What are your favorite historic resources? • Analog • Interviews • Family members • “Looking up” – take a walking tour • Digital • Newspapers • Library of Congress, National Archives
  15. 15. Local history creates meaningful products • Work with authentic topics. • Incorporate historic skills of inquiry and research. • Allow students more control over their learning. • BUT: Students must generate authentic products. • Information sheets • Suggested plans of action • Presentations or publications
  16. 16. Q3: What are some ideas for investigating my area? • Group up • Brainstorming sessions; all ideas are good! • We’ll share out at the end 1. What about your place is special, important, or interesting? 2. Form at least one question about that special, important, or interesting thing 3. Can you think of resources to help you answer that question? 4. What is the “authentic product”?
  17. 17. Sharing our ideas 1. What about your place is special, important, or interesting? 2. Form at least one question about that special, important, or interesting thing 3. Can you think of resources to help you answer that question? 4. What is the “authentic product”?
  18. 18. Focus on the end product • Investigating the history of your school to create a Facebook/Fakebook profile • Using neighborhood walks to create tourism brochures • Historic investigations through court records (befriend your local court clerk!) • Oral history projects with community residents • Creating an “info plaque” for interesting or important community spaces
  19. 19. Guiding Questions 1. What do the standards say about historical inquiry? • Important skill • Closely tied to textual analysis 2. Why local history? • Accessible and interesting • Broad connections 3. What are some ideas for investigation in our local areas? • Look around! • Create authentic products

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