F
acilitate Student’s L
earning

Dr Tarek Tawfik Amin
Objectives of the session.
o T define the meaning of learning.
o
o T conceptualize the different intelligences
o
involved ...
W
hat is learning?
 Can be viewed as the process of acquiring
new knowledge, skills, insights and
attitudes (1).
 Useful...
F
orms of learning and their contexts.
Formal

P
lanned teaching
and learning activities

Problem-based
F
ormal /informal
...
E
xperience and learning

Co ne o f le arning , de ve lo pe d and
re vise d by B
rucy Hyland fro m
mate rials by Edg ar Da...
Educational Environment
Content
How to deliver

Faculty and Curriculum
What to learn
Students

How to learn

Student
perfo...
Active learning

W
hat I do, I understand..
W
hat I see, I remember..
W
hat I hear, I forget.

Co nfucius
W ays we lear n and r etain lear ning.
100

80

90
80

70

70
60
50
40
30
20

95

50
30
18

20

%

10
0
R ea
di n

H ea
S
...
M
ultiple intelligences and types of
learners.
•Verbal/
•L
inguistic
“ Word Smart”

L
ogical/
M
athematical

“Number/
Reas...
M
ultiple intelligences learning
centers.
•Verbal/
•L
inguistic
“ Word Smart”

L
ogical/
M
athematical

“Number/
Reasoning...
H to facilitate learning
ow
•
•
•
•

B prepared “first day”
e
E
ffective teaching
E
ffective communications
Appropriate in...
I- F
rom T F Day.
he irst
Instructor’s
demeanor

oT
eacher's behavior set the tone for the course.
oAllow for self and stu...
I- F
rom T F Day.
he irst
Ice breakers Develop teamwork and small peer groups.
and
community
builder.
oA syllabus “plan of...
II- E
ffective teaching
Instructor conduct:

Responsive & helpful to students
Avoid bluffing, sarcasm or ridicule
Demon...
III- E
ffective Communications for L
earning.
Effective
communication

oMessage, decoding, feedback.
oListening: hearing a...
IV- Instructional Strategies
L
ectures (± Audiovisuals)
Instructional strategies
Strengths and limitations of each Discu...
IV- Instructional Strategies
Demonstrations done by the
instructors

B
eing a role model
M
odeling significant technical...
Ideas to develop effective learning
assignments and class room activities.

















Audiovisuals
B...
Conclusions
1. L
earning intelligences should be explored
and employed in multiplicity.
2. L
earning strategies should be ...
T
hank you
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Facilitate student learning

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Strategies to facilitate learning, popular learning modes, how to encourage students learning abilities and the effectiveness of a good teaching.

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Facilitate student learning

  1. 1. F acilitate Student’s L earning Dr Tarek Tawfik Amin
  2. 2. Objectives of the session. o T define the meaning of learning. o o T conceptualize the different intelligences o involved in the learning process. o T portray the role of teacher in learning o facilitation using different strategies.
  3. 3. W hat is learning?  Can be viewed as the process of acquiring new knowledge, skills, insights and attitudes (1).  Useful and pragmatic definition developed by Senge 1990; as increasing knowledge to increase the capacity for effective action (2) . 1 A yris C. Te aching smart pe o ple ho w to le arn; Harvard B rg usine ss Re vie w, 1 9 9 1 : 9 9 -1 0 9 . 2 Se ng e P. The fifth discipline , Do uble day De ll Publishing Gro up, N 1 9 9 0 . Y,
  4. 4. F orms of learning and their contexts. Formal P lanned teaching and learning activities Problem-based F ormal /informal Informal Under the control of the learner Incidental B product of other y activities Situated Situation-acquired knowledge
  5. 5. E xperience and learning Co ne o f le arning , de ve lo pe d and re vise d by B rucy Hyland fro m mate rials by Edg ar Dale . We tend to remember 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we hear & see Our level of involvement Reading Verbal receiving Hearing words Looking at pictures Watching a movie Visual receiving Looking at an exhibit Watching a demonstration Seeing done on location 70% of what we say Participation in discussion Giving a talk Doing a dramatic presentation 90% of what we both say and do Simulating the real experience Doing the real thing Receiving Participating Doing
  6. 6. Educational Environment Content How to deliver Faculty and Curriculum What to learn Students How to learn Student performance Assessment A dapte d fro m A EE Educatio n Guide 1 4. Outco me B d Educatio n M ase
  7. 7. Active learning W hat I do, I understand.. W hat I see, I remember.. W hat I hear, I forget. Co nfucius
  8. 8. W ays we lear n and r etain lear ning. 100 80 90 80 70 70 60 50 40 30 20 95 50 30 18 20 % 10 0 R ea di n H ea S r i n g eei n g g S ee D is P er T ea c us son c hin & H sw al E g ear ith xpe o th r i en er s ce William Glasse r 1 9 9 7 .
  9. 9. M ultiple intelligences and types of learners. •Verbal/ •L inguistic “ Word Smart” L ogical/ M athematical “Number/ Reasoning Smart” B odilyK inesthetic “ Body Smart” Visual/ Spatial “ Picture Smart” Select and Apply instructional strategies along these intelligences. Naturalist “ Nature Smart” M usical “ Music Smart” Interpersonal “ People Smart” Intrapersonal “ Self Smart” Garde ne r H. Harvard, 1 9 8 3.
  10. 10. M ultiple intelligences learning centers. •Verbal/ •L inguistic “ Word Smart” L ogical/ M athematical “Number/ Reasoning Smart” Reading center M ath & Science center Analyze and organize Problem solving, deductive Reasoning, experiments information Newly added M usic center B odilyK inesthetic Visual/ Spatial “ Picture Smart” “ Body Smart” B uilding center Art center M edia, demos, charts P ictures, simulation M odels, dramatize W orking together Center P ersonal work center P roblem solving, questions earn in rhythmic ways Brain storming, discussion Observation, meditation L Naturalist “ Nature Smart” M usical “ Music Smart” Interpersonal “ People Smart” Research, projects Intrapersonal “ Self Smart” Garde ne r H. Harvard, 1 9 8 3.
  11. 11. H to facilitate learning ow • • • • B prepared “first day” e E ffective teaching E ffective communications Appropriate instructional strategies
  12. 12. I- F rom T F Day. he irst Instructor’s demeanor oT eacher's behavior set the tone for the course. oAllow for self and student introduction. oAllow for student stories and individual attention. oSmile. E mpowering students oFind your student goals and expectations for the course. oCorrelate expectations with learning outcomes and course content. oT to explore the learning intelligences in the class. ry 1st day DOs oP lan-rehearse first lesson. oAppear confident all the times. oH ave syllabus and / grading criteria written out for the student to have. or oT reat all students the same. oM odel the appropriate language and behaviors you want students to use in class or institution. oSmile. oT your students about your credentials, experience and your personal desire to ell success. oB enthusiastic. e oT to be their friend “one of the guy”. ry oYell oT ethnic, sexist jokes. ell oB unprepared. e 1st day DON’T s
  13. 13. I- F rom T F Day. he irst Ice breakers Develop teamwork and small peer groups. and community builder. oA syllabus “plan of action of course over a certain period of time” both contents and expected behavior. oF ocus on expectations and outcomes. oP hilosophy of teaching should be explicit. oR espond politely and honestly to students questions and concerns. oF name of the course and course ID #. Syllabus ull developme oM eeting times (including dates and places ‘room #’” nt and oName, P hone no., e-mail, office number and office hours. essential oStudent learning outcomes, competencies, skills, and knowledge to be gained. information. oF name of the texts (date of publication), and materials needed for the ull course. oOutline of work to be covered either daily or weekly. oM ajor assignments and activities (tests, projects, field visits, etc. ) oGrading policy and criteria. oAttendance policy. oCalendar for activities, and due dates. H ave syllabus Ready
  14. 14. II- E ffective teaching Instructor conduct: Responsive & helpful to students Avoid bluffing, sarcasm or ridicule Demonstrates patience Avoid profanity Gestures, standing, sitting, circulating. Smiling, speaking louder, softer Seeks out students input & questions Consistently assesses student learning. Instructor traits: E ffective teaching P rinciples: Demonstrates concern for learners K nowledge of subject and skills P ositive approachable personality P rofessional attitudes Role model for students Commitment to student learning Available to coach and mentor Use feedback to improve. Active listening skills. oVary ur instructional methods. oActively involve students oE mpower students oW ork to achieve outcomes oAdequate resources & motivation oF ocus on students rather content oSelf and student –assessments oE valuate based on learning OCs oM aintain flexibility
  15. 15. III- E ffective Communications for L earning. Effective communication oMessage, decoding, feedback. oListening: hearing and understanding. oPresent subject matter in logical matter. oUse examples and analogies to amplify and support key points. oStimulate thinking with comparisons and contrast. oActive involvement ‘ questions, reviews, exercise labs, field visits’ Communicating with diverse learners - Be sensitive to the cultural and intellectual diversities. Active listening About 70% of our working day is spent in some form of verbal communication. We listen at a rate of 300-500 words /minutes. Students listen based on interest, mood, respect for speaker, and if information is important and needed.
  16. 16. IV- Instructional Strategies L ectures (± Audiovisuals) Instructional strategies Strengths and limitations of each Discussion Active-student-centered strategies Facilitation as teaching Demonstration Small group work. Simulation W eb-based Individual conferencing oB rain storming oInteractive lectures oRole play oP rojects and demonstrations oCase studies oGroup work oF ield study oW hole class-small group discussion. L aboratory environment Different learning activities simultaneously Student focused group learning Assessment
  17. 17. IV- Instructional Strategies Demonstrations done by the instructors B eing a role model M odeling significant technical skills Showing skills in step-by step sequence slowly Repeating the demonstrations using students Streamline oral explanations Allow students to ask at every step Lectures “ giving and receiving feedback” oAvoid “sage on stage syndrome” oAsk real questions oGive students time to think oAssess students understanding “questions-body language” oDevise opportunities for students to apply the information. Avoid relying too much Get students actively involved after reading assignments. Using textbooks
  18. 18. Ideas to develop effective learning assignments and class room activities.                 Audiovisuals B rainstorming Case studies Community study Computers Demonstrations Discussion Display F ield research F ilms F charts lip Graphics Assignments Independent study Investigation/ reporting L aboratory work                       L arge-small group instruction L ibrary search W eb-based search L istening P and other electronic based information DA Oral recitations P anels symposium P rojects Reading out loud Resource persons Reviews Role playing Simulation Slides T eam teaching Coaching and mentoring T eam teaching Supervised study Verbal illustrations Visual illustrations W ork study W riting
  19. 19. Conclusions 1. L earning intelligences should be explored and employed in multiplicity. 2. L earning strategies should be adjusted according to the importance of skills to be acquired and the learning centers operating through different intelligences 3. E ffective teaching, communication, and instructional strategies all operating to facilitate learning if effectively applied.
  20. 20. T hank you

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