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Defining MVP with Scenarios

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UX in the City Manchester 2017
SwanseaCon 2017
Tatiana Kolesnikova and Arvid Torset

Published in: Design
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Defining MVP with Scenarios

  1. 1. @unicorn_job linkedin.com/in/tatianakolesnikova Tatiana Kolesnikova @arvtor linkedin.com/in/arvidtorset Arvid Torset Defining MVP with scenarios
  2. 2. Image credit: Naked Science
  3. 3. Investment: $ 1 000 000 Testing: 18 months
  4. 4. Image creditImage credit: Naked Science
  5. 5. Integrated UX User- Oriented Design Agile Process Lean Business Model
  6. 6. Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3 Feature 4
  7. 7. Can’t have them all at once Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3 Feature 4
  8. 8. Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3 Feature 4
  9. 9. MVP? Log in Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3 Feature 4 Chat Forum Profile
  10. 10. Log in Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3 Feature 4 Chat Forum Profile ? Feature 6 Feature 5 ?MVP?
  11. 11. MVP defined feature by feature 1. No certainty if it is minimum 2. No certainty if it is end-to end 3. Growing
  12. 12. Key selling features Key risks Lean business model
  13. 13. People want a device that they wear on their eyes and that gives information about their surroundings.
  14. 14. 5 million Norwegians need protection from polar bears.
  15. 15. 1. Find most risky assumptions. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Defining MVP
  16. 16. Don’t ask what MVP should be – ask what MVP needs to do.
  17. 17. How do we know if our assumptions are right?
  18. 18. 1. Find most risky assumptions. 2. Describe what needs to happen. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Defining MVP
  19. 19. 1. Input goals and physical condition; 2. Receive workouts; 3. Input progress; 4. Receive corrected workouts. What needs to happen
  20. 20. First workout Jane opens the instructions of the first exercise. It is treadmill. She is not sure how to change the settings on the treadmill, but the app shows her this information. Jane sees that she needs to run for 10 minutes. She starts the timer in the app and after 10 minutes the app tells Jane to stop. She reports the distance she has run and continues with the next exercise.
  21. 21. 1. Find most risky assumptions. 2. Describe what needs to happen. 3. Add sketches. 4. 5. 6. 7. Defining MVP
  22. 22. Find small needs at each step
  23. 23. First workout Jane opens the instructions of the first exercise. It is treadmill. She is not sure how to change the settings on the treadmill, but the app shows her this information. Jane sees that she needs to run for 10 minutes. She starts the timer in the app and after 10 minutes the app tells Jane to stop. She reports the distance she has run and continues with the next exercise.
  24. 24. First workout Jane opens the instructions of the first exercise. It is treadmill. She is not sure how to change the settings on the treadmill, but the app shows her this information. Jane sees that she needs to run for 10 minutes. Alexander reads the description of the exercise, sees that he has to run 20 minutes at 5 degrees. He sets these parameters on the treadmill.
  25. 25. First workout Jane opens the instructions of the first exercise. It is treadmill. She is not sure how to change the settings on the treadmill, but the app shows her this information. Alexander reads the description of the exercise, sees that he has to run 20 minutes at 5 degrees. He sets these parameters on the treadmill.
  26. 26. 1. Show only what matters; 2. Don’t suggest wrong level of precision; 3. Discuss rather then sell.
  27. 27. 1. Find most risky assumptions. 2. Describe what needs to happens. 3. Add sketches. 4. Share the vision with the team. 5. 6. 7. Defining MVP
  28. 28. 1. Find most risky assumptions. 2. Describe what needs to happen. 3. Share the vision with the team. 4. Add details. 5. Create user story map. 6. 7. Defining MVP
  29. 29. First workout Jane opens the instructions of the first exercise. It is treadmill. She is not sure how to change the settings on the treadmill, but the app shows her this information. Alexander reads the description of the exercise, sees that he has to run 20 minutes at 5 degrees. He sets these parameters on the treadmill.
  30. 30. First workout Jane opens the instructions of the first exercise. It is treadmill. She is not sure how to change the settings on the treadmill, but the app shows her this information. Alexander reads the description of the exercise, sees that he has to run 20 minutes at 5 degrees. He sets these parameters on the treadmill.
  31. 31. 2 3 5 3 1 13 5 8 5 1 2 5 2 3 2 1 2 2 3 3 3 5 1 3 76/24 2 3 5 3 5 3 2 2 3 2 2 133/12
  32. 32. Jira
  33. 33. Sprint
  34. 34. Looking for specific education in relevant field Susan looks at the list of candidates for the position of Java developer and specifies that she wants to leave only those who have masters and as the field of study selects IT. She sees that in the resulting list there are both masters and PhDs and the fields of study are different, but all of them are relevant: IT, computer sciences, software engineering etc. Susan, 40 HR in a municipal electricity provider
  35. 35. 1. Progressive increase of the level of details. Key principles
  36. 36. 1. Progressive increase of the level of details. 2. Collaboration from day one. 3. Outcome first – solutions second. Key principles
  37. 37. @unicorn_job linkedin.com/in/tatianakolesnikova Tatiana Kolesnikova @arvtor linkedin.com/in/arvidtorset Arvid Torset THANK YOU

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