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EDUC 6707 smitht

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Comprehensin and Instructional strategies

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EDUC 6707 smitht

  1. 1. READ 6707: Reading and Literacy Growth, Grades 4–6 May 24, 2015 By: Tarina Smith
  2. 2. Graphic organizers and semantic organizers. Graphic organizers illustrate concepts and relationships between ideas in a text. Graphic organizers are known by different names, such as maps, webs, graphs, charts, frames, or clusters.
  3. 3. Examples or Graphic Organizers Venn Diagram- Used to compare or contrast information from two sources Story Map- used to be organized into fiction and nonfiction text structures. For example, defining characters, setting, events, problem, resolution in a fiction story; however in a nonfiction story, main idea and details would be identified. Cause and Effect- Used to illustrate the cause and effects told within a text. For example, staying in the sun too long may lead to a painful sunburn.
  4. 4. Examples or Graphic Organizers Venn Diagram Story Map Cause and Effect
  5. 5. QAR- The Question-Answer Relationship Strategy (QAR) encourages students to learn how to answer questions better. Students are asked to indicate whether the information they used to answer questions about the text was textually explicit information (information that was directly stated in the text), textually implicit information (information that was implied in the text), or information entirely from the student's own background knowledge.
  6. 6. QAR- The Question-Answer Relationship Strategy  Right There" Questions found right in the text . Example: Who is Frog's friend? Answer: Toad  "Think and Search" The answers are normally found in more than one place, calling for students to "think" and "search" through the passage to find the answer.  "Author and You" Student's must understand to relate the text to their prior knowledge before answering the question. "On Your Own" Questions are answered based on a students schema and experiences.
  7. 7. Direct explanation The teacher explains to students why the strategy helps comprehension and when to apply the strategy. Modeling The teacher models, or demonstrates, how to apply the strategy, usually by "thinking aloud" while reading the text that the students are using. Guided practice The teacher guides and assists students as they learn how and when to apply the strategy. Application The teacher helps students practice the strategy until they can apply it independently. Explicit Instruction
  8. 8. • Making Connection – students make personal connections with the text by using their schema / background knowledge . • There are 3 main types of connections when we read text. When using this instructional strategy it is important to activate the students prior knowldege before during and after reading the text.
  9. 9. Graphic organizers , and QRA’s are some of the most effective researched based comprehension strategies that can help support the transitional, intermediate, and advance literacy learners.  The graphic organizers support the learners by giving by them a visual illustration of the relationship between the text and concepts .  The QAR , question answer relationship engages students in how to response questions using critical thinking skills
  10. 10. Instructional strategies are most effective research base instructional strategies that support transitional, intermediate, and advance literacy learners . Explicit instruction is an instructional strategy used with CCSS. Direct explanation  The teacher explains to students why the strategy helps comprehension and when to apply the strategy.  Modeling  Guided practice  Application The second instructional strategy used is making connections, the student's make personal connections with the text by using their schema9 background knowledge ) there are 3 main types of connections when we read text. According to the author through research, it is found that reading comprehension improves most wen teacher provide clear explicit comprehension instruction
  11. 11. The second instructional strategy used is making connections, According to the author through research, it is found that reading comprehension improves most when teachers provide clear explicit comprehension instruction Reutzel, D. R., & Cooter, R. B., Jr. (2016).
  12. 12. Reading comprehension is composed of two equally important components. This is the components that struggling readers tend to have difficulty with. SEDL. (2013).
  13. 13. SEDL. (2013). SEDL. (2013).  5 Elements that support Language Comprehension 1) Background knowledge 2) Linguistic knowledge 3) Phonology 4) Semantics 5) Syntax Language Comprehension- the ability to understand spoken language
  14. 14. SEDL. (2013). SEDL. (2013).  Cipher  Lexical  Phoneme Awareness  Knowledge of Alphabetic principal  Letter knowledge  Concept of Print Decoding - ability to translate text into speech, is only part of the process of reading comprehension.
  15. 15.  This lesson indeed gives the students an allotted time to read on a daily basis.  It provides time for them to read text of their choice.  The instructional plan gives the students variety of ways to practice reading.  This reading lesson gave the teacher a structured time to touch base with each student over a period of time, assess progress, and target instruction. A Daily DEAR Program: Drop Everything, and Read! International Reading Association (IRA) and National Council of Teachers of English. (2014a).
  16. 16. The instructional strategy used in the lesson was Schema – the teacher use story structure knowledge to guide text comprehension during the teacher conference session with the students. The comprehension strategy used in the lesson was QAR this was used when the students using the pal book talk session. International Reading Association (IRA) and National Council of Teachers of English. (2014a).ReadWriteThink.
  17. 17. Laureate Education (Producer). (2014g). Laureate Education (Producer). (2014g).  Students compose their own comprehensive thinking  knowing how to answer questions about a text  Monitoring their reading  Fix up strategies  Teacher models  the teacher chooses strategies that are closely aligned with the text students are reading  Environment that a teacher creates.  collaborative or cooperative groups created by the teacher. Comprehension Instructional
  18. 18.  Adler, C.(.d.) Seven Strategies to Teach Students Text Comprehension retrieved from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/seven-strategies-teach- students-text-comprehension   International Reading Association (IRA) and National Council of Teachers of English. (2014a).ReadWriteThink. Retrieved from http://www.readwritethink.org/search/?grade=13&resourc e_type=6&learning_objective=8  Laureate Education (Producer). (2014g). Conversations with Ray Reutzel: Supporting comprehension[Audio file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Reutzel, D. R., & Cooter, R. B., Jr. (2016). Strategies for reading assessment and instruction in an era of common core standards: Helping every child succeed (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.  SEDL. (2013). Cognitive elements of reading. Retrieved fromhttp://www.sedl.org/reading/framework/elements.html

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