Badge-EmpoweredLearningFacilitated by: Sarah BlattnerEdJewcon 5773.1Gottlieb Academy, Jacksonville, FLConversation:http://...
Nice to meet you…Sarah BlattnerFounder & Executive Director@tamritzlearning#jedbadgessarah@tamritz.org
“If we teach today as wetaught yesterday,we rob our children of tomorrow.”-John Dewey
How do youth interactwith digital media?“HangingOut”“MessingAround”“GeekingOut”
PrinciplesInterest-poweredPeer-supportedAcademicallyoriented
Badges in Our Lives
http://openbadges.org
Digital Badge LearningBadges = visual representations ofa skill or achievement
A Badge is Better than an A+
Game Design : Learning DesignImage by domnitLeonid Domnitser
Game Design : Learning DesignMagnifying Glass designed byGwenaelle georget from the Noun Project?
Image by Rebecca SiegelGrongar photo streamDesignEvaluatePrototype
Game Design : Learning DesignPhoto by Vlad Genie
Image by skyler817
What comes up?
Tamritz is proudly incubated byand generously supported by
Badge-Empowered Learning
Badge-Empowered Learning
Badge-Empowered Learning
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Badge-Empowered Learning

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Sarah Blattner's presentation, "Badge-Empowered Learning" at EdJewcon 5773.1/2013.

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  • Give folks an orientation to the webinar interface panel:-microphones muted; to speak, unmute your microphone-chat-questions
  • Ask folks to introduce themselves, school.*What was your first question when you saw this topic?*Raise hands, how many heard of badge learning?About Me:-background in education, 4 Jewish Day Schools, MPT, profound interest in bringing outside world into classroom, making learning relevant for kids; always been a project-based learning teacher before I even knew what that exactly meant
  • A team of scholars engaged in the study of digital media and learning examined how kids live and learn with new media. The resulting research portrays a clear and remarkable picture of digital youth culture and practices. This is what it means to grow up in the digital era.Hanging Out: youth use new media to hang out and extend existing friendships, using online networks to extend friendships that they navigate in the familiar contexts of schools, religious organizations, sports and other local activitiesMessing Around: A smaller number of youth use the online world to explore interests and find information that goes beyond what they have access to at school or in their local community. Online groups enable youth to connect with peers who share specialized niche interests.Geeking Out: Others geek out and dive into a topic or talent. What makes these groups unique is that while adults participate, they are not automatically residential experts by virtue of their age. Geeking out breaks down traditional markers of status and authority. Basically, adults are more welcome in the geeky arenas.
  • Just recently, a group of scholars engaged through the MacArthur Foundation released a report on “connected learning.” A key feature of the report focuses on learning principles that support a connected learning experience.Interest-powered – Interests power the drive to acquire knowledge and expertise. Research shows that learners who are interested in what they are learning, achieve higher order learning outcomes. Connected learning does not just rely on the innate interests of the individual learner, but views interests and passions as something to be actively developed in the context of personalized learning pathways that allow for specialized and diverse identities and interests.Peer-supported – Learning in the context of peer interaction is engaging and participatory. Research shows that among friends and peers, young people fluidly contribute, share, and give feedback to one another, producing powerful learning. Connected learning research demonstrates that peer learning need not be peer-isolated. In the context of interest-driven activity, adult participation is welcomed by young people. Although expertise and roles in peer learning can differ based on age and experience, everyone gives feedback to one another and can contribute and share their knowledge and views.Academically oriented – Educational institutions are centered on the principle that intellectual growth thrives when learning is directed towards academic achievement and excellence. Connected learning recognizes the importance of academic success for intellectual growth and as an avenue towards economic and political opportunity. Peer culture and interest-driven activity needs to be connected to academic subjects, institutions, and credentials for diverse young people to realize these opportunities. Connected learning mines and translates popular peer culture and community-based knowledge for academic relevance.
  • Badges in our lives…-pins, buttons, patches, scouting, youth movements-Tells us we are part of a group and the images signify something, an accomplishment, a membership, distinction-What do badges signify: Membership, opinions, affiliations, achievements, participation, behaviors DML Competition, Mozilla and MacArthur, create ecosystem for badge learningBased on researchWho?-Epstein School in Atlanta-School districts in Colorado and California-Complementary Jewish education world-Higher education, like Purdue University’s Passport-Peer 2 Peer University-EdX-Disney Pixar-Smithsonian-New York City Department of EducationShare a case study scenarioBased on principles of connected learning and learning design:-collaborative, social, participatory-steeped in design principles of play, prototyping, iterations-value in collaborating with peers and experts—the synergy of that collaborative process pushes all much farther than we could go on our own
  • Anytime, anywhere learningLearning in multiple contextsShow your achievementsMicro-credentialing, alternative credentialingMozilla’s open source ecosystem
  • Metadata, hardcoded, digital transcript and visualTells learner’s storyDML Competition, Mozilla and MacArthur, create ecosystem for badge learningBased on researchWho?-Epstein School in Atlanta-School districts in Colorado and California-Complementary Jewish education world-Higher education, like Purdue University’s Passport-Peer 2 Peer University-EdX-Disney Pixar-Smithsonian-New York City Department of EducationShare a case study scenarioBased on principles of connected learning and learning design:-collaborative, social, participatory-steeped in design principles of play, prototyping, iterations-value in collaborating with peers and experts—the synergy of that collaborative process pushes all much farther than we could go on our own
  • Digital backpack13 +Digital PortfolioShare out to social media interfaces and decide which items to share
  • Alternative assessment & credentialingArtifacts demonstrate understandings; mutliple pathways in learningIterative prototyping, low-stakesFun in failureTeachers as coach, facilitator, collaboratorStudent-directedProject-basedMultiple pathways
  • The Pivot—Opens up space of possibilities—room to experiment,Katie Salen, Executive Director of the Institute of PlayShe talks about 4 design principles that are the core of how her “Quest to Learn” schools design learning—these are game-based schools where kids’ learning is organized around the principles of games and systems:Create a “need to know” by organizing learning around solving complex problems set in engaging contextsOffer a space of possibility for learners. Tinker, explore, hypothesize & test assumptions. Low stakes—not about fear of failingRather, it is about prototyping, creating iterations, the process is always evolving, learning is always evolving. Taking risks is how we learn.Build in opportunities for authority and expertise to be shared and made reciprocal among learners/mentors/students. Need everyone to contribute. Recognition as everyone can be an expert at something.5. Support multiple, overlapping pathways toward mastery. There is more than 1 way to move through content.
  • Create a Need to Know!Katie Salen, Executive Director of the Institute of PlayShe talks about 4 design principles that are the core of how her “Quest to Learn” schools design learning—these are game-based schools where kids’ learning is organized around the principles of games and systems:Create a “need to know” by organizing learning around solving complex problems set in engaging contextsOffer a space of possibility for learners. Tinker, explore, hypothesize & test assumptions. Low stakes—not about fear of failingRather, it is about prototyping, creating iterations, the process is always evolving, learning is always evolving. Taking risks is how we learn.Build in opportunities for authority and expertise to be shared and made reciprocal among learners/mentors/students. Need everyone to contribute. Recognition as everyone can be an expert at something.5. Support multiple, overlapping pathways toward mastery. There is more than 1 way to move through content.
  • Iterative prototypingHard FunFail to learn and failing is funLow-stakes
  • Stand on shoulders of your peers—everyone has something to contribute in The learning experience and it’s social and participatory. No one knows it all. Knowledge is accessible by all.Katie Salen, Executive Director of the Institute of PlayShe talks about 4 design principles that are the core of how her “Quest to Learn” schools design learning—these are game-based schools where kids’ learning is organized around the principles of games and systems:Create a “need to know” by organizing learning around solving complex problems set in engaging contextsOffer a space of possibility for learners. Tinker, explore, hypothesize & test assumptions. Low stakes—not about fear of failingRather, it is about prototyping, creating iterations, the process is always evolving, learning is always evolving. Taking risks is how we learn.Build in opportunities for authority and expertise to be shared and made reciprocal among learners/mentors/students. Need everyone to contribute. Recognition as everyone can be an expert at something.5. Support multiple, overlapping pathways toward mastery. There is more than 1 way to move through content.
  • Student-driven, passion-based, student-interest driven
  • Gives kids relevant way to engage in using digital media literacy skills,Collaborating, communicating, creating, synthesizing, solving problems,Web savvyKatie Salen, Executive Director of the Institute of PlayShe talks about 4 design principles that are the core of how her “Quest to Learn” schools design learning—these are game-based schools where kids’ learning is organized around the principles of games and systems:Create a “need to know” by organizing learning around solving complex problems set in engaging contextsOffer a space of possibility for learners. Tinker, explore, hypothesize & test assumptions. Low stakes—not about fear of failingRather, it is about prototyping, creating iterations, the process is always evolving, learning is always evolving. Taking risks is how we learn.Build in opportunities for authority and expertise to be shared and made reciprocal among learners/mentors/students. Need everyone to contribute. Recognition as everyone can be an expert at something.5. Support multiple, overlapping pathways toward mastery. There is more than 1 way to move through content.
  • Example: Digital Me, open badges project that focuses on kids broadcasting and reporting sporting eventsKids talk about what open badges mean to them
  • I am sure you have a lot of questions. I would be happy to set up additional time with your school’s learning team to discuss fine details of how Tamritz and badge learning could be implemented in your school.
  • Badge-Empowered Learning

    1. 1. Badge-EmpoweredLearningFacilitated by: Sarah BlattnerEdJewcon 5773.1Gottlieb Academy, Jacksonville, FLConversation:http://todaysmeet.com/badging
    2. 2. Nice to meet you…Sarah BlattnerFounder & Executive Director@tamritzlearning#jedbadgessarah@tamritz.org
    3. 3. “If we teach today as wetaught yesterday,we rob our children of tomorrow.”-John Dewey
    4. 4. How do youth interactwith digital media?“HangingOut”“MessingAround”“GeekingOut”
    5. 5. PrinciplesInterest-poweredPeer-supportedAcademicallyoriented
    6. 6. Badges in Our Lives
    7. 7. http://openbadges.org
    8. 8. Digital Badge LearningBadges = visual representations ofa skill or achievement
    9. 9. A Badge is Better than an A+
    10. 10. Game Design : Learning DesignImage by domnitLeonid Domnitser
    11. 11. Game Design : Learning DesignMagnifying Glass designed byGwenaelle georget from the Noun Project?
    12. 12. Image by Rebecca SiegelGrongar photo streamDesignEvaluatePrototype
    13. 13. Game Design : Learning DesignPhoto by Vlad Genie
    14. 14. Image by skyler817
    15. 15. What comes up?
    16. 16. Tamritz is proudly incubated byand generously supported by

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