Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Effect of Model Video Viewing
Order on Speaking
Performance in Japanese EFL
Classrooms
Yasuko Okada
(Seisen University, Ja...
Our interests are…
• To develop students’ public speaking skills
in English
• To make effective use of video-recordings
of...
Research Questions
1. How does model video observation affect
EFL learners’ speaking performance in
the classroom?
2. Are ...
Outline
1.Previous studies
2.Method
3.Results
4.Discussion
5.Conclusion
4
Observational learning
• Most human behavior is learned through
observation and modelling (Bandura, 1977).
• Observational...
Instructional sequence effect
• Instructional sequence order has
affected foreign language learners’
comprehension/perform...
Okada, Sawaumi & Ito (2014)
• Conducted video-based observational
learning research in the Japanese EFL
context.
• Used mo...
Okada, Sawaumi & Ito (in press)
• Based on our 2014 study, we conducted a further
study.
• Showed more- and less-proficien...
Limitation on Okada et al. (in press)
• Insufficient number of participants: N = 27
• Maybe difficult to generalize the fi...
Outline
1.Previous studies
2.Method
3.Results
4.Discussion
5.Conclusions
10
Participants
• Twenty-four Japanese university students
• Enrolled in English communication in Fall 2015
• Class A (n = 10...
Model videos
• Selected from former Japanese EFL
students’ video recorded performances.
• Eight more-proficient models wer...
Data collection procedures
13
Round I
Round III
Round II
ORAL PRESENTATION
SELF- & PEER EVALUATION
ORAL PRESENTATION
ORAL ...
Round 1
ORAL PRESENTATION
SELF- & PEER EVALUATION
CLASS A:
MORE-PROFICIENTMODEL
OBSERVATION
CLASS B:
LESS-PROFICIENTMODEL
...
Round 2
ORAL PRESENTATION
SELF- & PEER EVALUATION
CLASS B:
MORE-PROFICIENT
MODEL OBSERVATION
CLASS A:
LESS-PROFICIENTMODEL...
Round 3
ORAL PRESENTATION
SELF- & PEER EVALUATION
VIDEO-BASED OBSERVATION
REFLECTION
16
Self & peer evaluation
forms
2nd R...
Evaluation form
• 11 variables on 4-point scale from 1 (weak) to 4 (great)
• 3 subscales: voice control (1-4), body langua...
Outline
1.Previous studies
2.Method
3.Results
4.Discussion
5.Conclusions
18
Data analysis
• Repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 22
• Class (A vs. B [between-participants factor],
performance round (f...
Summary of statistical analyses
voice
control
body
language
effective
voice
control
body
language
effective
Round * ** ** ...
Peer evaluated voice control
For Class B, more-proficient models might have helped
improve peer evaluated voice control.
21
Peer evaluated body language
For Class B, both less-proficient and more-proficient models
might have helped improve peer e...
Peer evaluated effectiveness
For Class B, more-proficient models might have helped
improve peer evaluated effectiveness.
23
1st reflection
• “I learned to imitate the more-proficient
speakers because they looked calm. I
consequently tried not to ...
2nd reflection
• “… I rehearsed several times so that I would
not stumble over the words. I was careful not to
move my bod...
Final reflection
• “I clearly understood the weaknesses in each
model. I therefore learned how to improve my
performance b...
Outline
1.Previous studies
2.Method
3.Results
4.Discussion
5.Conclusions
27
Discussion (RQ1)
• Video-based observational learning
positively affected learners’ speaking
performances.
• More-proficie...
Discussion (RQ2)
• Quantitative findings were consistent with
those of the original study (Okada et al., in
press).
• View...
Discussion (cont’d)
• For Class A, the first peer evaluation
scores were already high.
• The ceiling effect may have occur...
Outline
1.Previous studies
2.Method
3.Results
4.Discussion
5.Conclusion
31
Conclusion
• The quantitative results of this study was
consistent with the original study (Okada et al., in
press).
• Qua...
Acknowledgements
This work was supported by:
• JSPS Kakenhi Number 15K02730; and
• The Research Institute for Language
Edu...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

G273 Okada, Y., Sawaumi, T., & Ito, T. (2017, September). Effect of model video viewing order on speaking performances in Japanese EFL classrooms. GLoCALL and PCBET Joint International Conference 2017, Universiti Teknologi Brunei

7 views

Published on

Learners in foreign language classrooms can benefit from viewing model videos featuring other non-native speakers, which helps to develop their public speaking performance. The present study attempts to replicate Okada, Sawaumi, and Ito (in press), who demonstrated how the viewing order of different model speakers affected learners’ public speaking performance. The participants were Japanese freshmen (N = 24) enrolled English communication courses. In the classroom-oriented study, one group was shown more- and less-proficient speaker models prior to delivering the second and Okadathird presentations, respectively; the other group was shown the same models in the opposite order. To determine whether the models impacted learners in any meaningful way, self- and peer evaluations were obtained from participants following each speaking performance and analyzed in conjunction with responses to reflection papers. Results from two-way ANOVAs indicated that video-based observational learning in the viewing order of less-proficient speakers first and more-proficient ones next resulted in improved peer evaluation in subsequent performances, which was consistent with the findings of Okada et al. (in press). Responses to reflection papers revealed that either more-proficient or less-proficient speaker models helped enhance learners’ awareness of self/others and improve their own public speaking skills in the EFL classroom.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

G273 Okada, Y., Sawaumi, T., & Ito, T. (2017, September). Effect of model video viewing order on speaking performances in Japanese EFL classrooms. GLoCALL and PCBET Joint International Conference 2017, Universiti Teknologi Brunei

  1. 1. Effect of Model Video Viewing Order on Speaking Performance in Japanese EFL Classrooms Yasuko Okada (Seisen University, Japan) Takafumi Sawaumi (Ryutsu Keizai University, Japan) Takehiko Ito (Wako University, Japan) GLoCALL & PCBET 2017 Joint Conference, 7-9 September 2017 at Universiti Teknologi Brunei, Brunei Darussalam, Presented at Room 1, 11:00-11:30.
  2. 2. Our interests are… • To develop students’ public speaking skills in English • To make effective use of video-recordings of student speaking performance as models, but… • Not easy to collect student video data due to various reasons, but it may be possible to collect such data by conducting a replication study. 2
  3. 3. Research Questions 1. How does model video observation affect EFL learners’ speaking performance in the classroom? 2. Are learners able to benefit more from viewing speech model videos in less- proficient to more-proficient model sequence order or vice versa? 3
  4. 4. Outline 1.Previous studies 2.Method 3.Results 4.Discussion 5.Conclusion 4
  5. 5. Observational learning • Most human behavior is learned through observation and modelling (Bandura, 1977). • Observational learning processes: attention, retention, reproduction, and motivation. • In education settings, observational learning can assist students in recognizing behavioral patterns and developing cognitive skills. 5
  6. 6. Instructional sequence effect • Instructional sequence order has affected foreign language learners’ comprehension/performance, – Reading comprehension (Shimizu, 2007; Chen, 2012) – Listening performance (Winke, Gass & Syndrenko, 2010) – Speaking performance (Okada, Sawaumi & Ito, in press) 6
  7. 7. Okada, Sawaumi & Ito (2014) • Conducted video-based observational learning research in the Japanese EFL context. • Used more-proficient speaker models in the two groups (high-and low-level groups). • Concluded that the model videos successfully helped motivate high-level learners but didn’t help low-level learners. 7
  8. 8. Okada, Sawaumi & Ito (in press) • Based on our 2014 study, we conducted a further study. • Showed more- and less-proficient speaker models to two groups (equivalent language proficiency) in different order. • Both models helped motivate learners and enhance language skills for different purposes. • In particular, it was more effective to present less- proficient model first and more-proficient model next. 8
  9. 9. Limitation on Okada et al. (in press) • Insufficient number of participants: N = 27 • Maybe difficult to generalize the findings of the study • Thus it will be necessary to replicate findings of the study, using the same procedure with different participants. In this presentation, I will show you how our replication study was conducted. 9
  10. 10. Outline 1.Previous studies 2.Method 3.Results 4.Discussion 5.Conclusions 10
  11. 11. Participants • Twenty-four Japanese university students • Enrolled in English communication in Fall 2015 • Class A (n = 10) and Class B (n = 14) • Average TOEIC Bridge scores were 130 for class A and 116 for class B 11
  12. 12. Model videos • Selected from former Japanese EFL students’ video recorded performances. • Eight more-proficient models were from higher-level English classes. • Eight less-proficient models were from lower-level English classes. 12
  13. 13. Data collection procedures 13 Round I Round III Round II ORAL PRESENTATION SELF- & PEER EVALUATION ORAL PRESENTATION ORAL PRESENTATION SELF- & PEER EVALUATION SELF- & PEER EVALUATION CLASS A: MORE-PROFICIENT MODEL OBSERVATION CLASS B: LESS-PROFICIENTMODEL OBSERVATION CLASS B: MORE-PROFICIENT MODEL OBSERVATION CLASS A: LESS-PROFICIENTMODEL OBSERVATION VIDEO-BASED OBSERVATION REFLECTION
  14. 14. Round 1 ORAL PRESENTATION SELF- & PEER EVALUATION CLASS A: MORE-PROFICIENTMODEL OBSERVATION CLASS B: LESS-PROFICIENTMODEL OBSERVATION 14 Self & peer evaluation forms
  15. 15. Round 2 ORAL PRESENTATION SELF- & PEER EVALUATION CLASS B: MORE-PROFICIENT MODEL OBSERVATION CLASS A: LESS-PROFICIENTMODEL OBSERVATION 15 Self & peer evaluation forms 1st Reflection
  16. 16. Round 3 ORAL PRESENTATION SELF- & PEER EVALUATION VIDEO-BASED OBSERVATION REFLECTION 16 Self & peer evaluation forms 2nd Reflection Final Reflection
  17. 17. Evaluation form • 11 variables on 4-point scale from 1 (weak) to 4 (great) • 3 subscales: voice control (1-4), body language (5-8) & effectiveness (9-11) 17
  18. 18. Outline 1.Previous studies 2.Method 3.Results 4.Discussion 5.Conclusions 18
  19. 19. Data analysis • Repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 22 • Class (A vs. B [between-participants factor], performance round (first vs. second vs. third [repeated factor], and their interaction with self/peer evaluation scores • Reflection papers: text mining using Text Mining Studio, in addition to qualitative analysis 19
  20. 20. Summary of statistical analyses voice control body language effective voice control body language effective Round * ** ** ** ** Class * Round x Class ** ** * *p < .05 **p < .01 Peer evaluationSelf-evaluation Significant interaction effect 20
  21. 21. Peer evaluated voice control For Class B, more-proficient models might have helped improve peer evaluated voice control. 21
  22. 22. Peer evaluated body language For Class B, both less-proficient and more-proficient models might have helped improve peer evaluated body language. 22
  23. 23. Peer evaluated effectiveness For Class B, more-proficient models might have helped improve peer evaluated effectiveness. 23
  24. 24. 1st reflection • “I learned to imitate the more-proficient speakers because they looked calm. I consequently tried not to move my hands or body during my own performance.” (Class A) • “While watching the less-proficient speaker models, I realized that it was important to be understood by one’s listeners, and so I tried to speak clearly at an appropriate volume...” (Class B) 24
  25. 25. 2nd reflection • “… I rehearsed several times so that I would not stumble over the words. I was careful not to move my body or hands, since such behavior seemed to cause the less-proficient speakers to lose their concentration.” (Class A) • “I thought that I would deliver my performance as before, since the more-proficient speakers seemed too good to imitate. Nevertheless, I wanted to improve my performance.” (Class B) 25
  26. 26. Final reflection • “I clearly understood the weaknesses in each model. I therefore learned how to improve my performance by comparing the more- and less-proficient speakers.” (Class A) • “Aside from helping me to evaluate my own performances, I was able to see how well other students delivered their performances. I also became aware of my weaknesses, and [therefore] tried to imitate the more-proficient speakers. Watching my own and other students’ videos enabled me to explore ways to possibly improve my performance.” (Class B) 26
  27. 27. Outline 1.Previous studies 2.Method 3.Results 4.Discussion 5.Conclusions 27
  28. 28. Discussion (RQ1) • Video-based observational learning positively affected learners’ speaking performances. • More-proficient models observation helped participants enhance their English pronunciation and public speaking skills. • Viewing models helped to develop greater awareness of other students as well as greater self-awareness. 28
  29. 29. Discussion (RQ2) • Quantitative findings were consistent with those of the original study (Okada et al., in press). • Viewing less-proficient first and more- proficient next may be effective at improving peer evaluation on student performance. • But as the replication was conducted as part of regular lessons, other factors, e.g., watching self and peer video recordings, may have affected peer evaluation scores. 29
  30. 30. Discussion (cont’d) • For Class A, the first peer evaluation scores were already high. • The ceiling effect may have occurred, • It was speculated that: • Class A’s performance was good compared to that of Class B. • They were more lenient than those in Class B. • Class A’s peer evaluation scores may not have improved in the 2nd round, regardless of viewing order. 30
  31. 31. Outline 1.Previous studies 2.Method 3.Results 4.Discussion 5.Conclusion 31
  32. 32. Conclusion • The quantitative results of this study was consistent with the original study (Okada et al., in press). • Qualitative findings suggest that watching video recordings of model speakers was effective for different purposes and different reasons. • It will be necessary to enhance internal validity by using teacher evaluation in future study, though. • Viewing non-native speaker models may be feasible to improve EFL learners’ public speaking skills not only in Japan but also in other countries in Asia. 32
  33. 33. Acknowledgements This work was supported by: • JSPS Kakenhi Number 15K02730; and • The Research Institute for Language Education at Seisen University, Tokyo. 33

×