Lithium Ion Abuse Test Methods Lithium Ion Abuse Test MethodsImprovementErik J Spek, Dr. Mehdi Hosseinifar, TÜV SÜD    Por...
Abuse Testing of Lithium Ion Cells•   Summary  y•   Introduction Abuse Testing•   Role of Standards    Role of Standards• ...
Summary      yThe increasing use of high energy, high power lithium ion batteries for electricand hybrid vehicles has prog...
Introduction‐1•   Expectation: survivability in accidents and benign response     under abuse conditions. •   Standards he...
Introduction‐2•   Standards documents for batteries and other vehicle     electrification components.     electrification ...
Abuse Testing of Lithium‐Ion Cells            gRole of TÜV SÜD  • Third party, ISO 17025 certified, global testing company...
Available Standards & Practices‐1•   Many tests covering electrical, mechanical and thermal/environmental abuse that are u...
Available Standards & Practices‐2•   SAE and SAND tests do not present pass and fail criteria, •   SBA requires that no ex...
Drive to Standardize•   Failed cell or battery tests in 3rd party testing ‐> subsequent ripple effect.      –   Ripple eff...
Table 1: EUCAR Hazard Severity Levels (HSL)                                                                 TABLE I       ...
Testing Response ‐ 1      g    p• Cells that are abused may react in a number of ways from   no reaction to total and viol...
Testing Response ‐ 2      g    p• The risk of personal injury   with this level of testing is     ith thi l l f t ti i  hi...
Testing Response ‐ 3      g    p• one of 3 concrete   bunkers at TÜV   b k          TÜV  SÜD in Garching,   Germany design...
Test Methodology‐Development History              gy       p           y                    Table 2: SAE J2464 Cell Penetr...
Test Methodology‐Development History              gy       p           y    •   For both cylindrical and prismatic cells. ...
Test Methodology‐Development History              gy       p           y •   Since pneumatic cylinder force was considered...
Test Methodology‐Development History              gy       p           y •   Note that the HSL <5 was chosen since the tes...
Test Methodology‐Development History              gy       p           y         Table 3: TUV SUD Values for SAE J2464 Cel...
Test Methodology‐Development History              gy       p           y•   Pneumatic nail driving system was capable for ...
Penetration Test to Date•   A total of over 250 cells have been subjected to the TUV SUD standard cell     p    penetratio...
Penetration Test to Date•   The data from all of these tests have been analyzed to search for trends and influencing facto...
Results• As a first indicator of confidence in the test method and cell quality,   data was sorted to search for the time ...
Fig 5: HSL Trend over Time  g• population of 182   p p                         100  penetration test cells       90  selec...
Fig 6a: Effect of SOC on HSL _ restrained  g                          _• %SOC at a selected cell   range of 30‐40 Ah on HS...
Fig 6b: Effect of SOC on HSL _ unrestrained  g                          _• SOC on HSL for 44   unrestrained cells over   u...
Fig 7: Effect of Nail Speed on HSL  g                    p• population of 258 samples. • 30‐40 Ah in the restrained   stat...
Conclusion•   The shortcomings of the standardized nail penetration abuse test are addressed     and a robust procedure ha...
Acknowledgement         g• The Authors would like to thank the personnel of                                       p  TÜV S...
References1.    Standardization Roadmap for Electric Vehicles, ANSI EVSP ver. 1, 2012. Available:       http://www.ansi.or...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lithium Ion Abuse Test Methods Improvement [Presentation Slides]

2,687 views

Published on

At the 2012 IEEE Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering (IEEE PSES) on Nov. 5th 2012 in Portland, Oregon, TÜV SÜD America's Erik J Spek, presented on "Lithium Ion Abuse Test Methods Improvement."

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,687
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Lithium Ion Abuse Test Methods Improvement [Presentation Slides]

  1. 1. Lithium Ion Abuse Test Methods Lithium Ion Abuse Test MethodsImprovementErik J Spek, Dr. Mehdi Hosseinifar, TÜV SÜD  Portland 5 – 7 November  2012 Oregon http://www.psessymposium.org/ 1
  2. 2. Abuse Testing of Lithium Ion Cells• Summary y• Introduction Abuse Testing• Role of Standards Role of Standards• Standardization of Test Methods• Response to Abuse Tests Response to Abuse Tests• Survey of TÜV SÜD Nail Penetration Tests since 2009 2
  3. 3. Summary yThe increasing use of high energy, high power lithium ion batteries for electricand hybrid vehicles has progressed to the point of commercial introduction introduction.Nevertheless, these cells are yet to show strong resistance to thermal,mechanical and electrical abuse.Despite the availability of test recommended procedures and standards forcharacterizing the cell response to abuse stimuli, b h ii h ll b i li better engineered and i d drobust test methods need to be developed within the context of thesestandards.Attempts to improve the nail penetration abuse test procedure are described p p p pin this presentation.The effects of various parameters on the hazard response level of Li‐ion cellshave been evaluated.It is concluded that Li ion technologies are generally becoming less sensitive Li‐ionto abuse conditions. 3
  4. 4. Introduction‐1• Expectation: survivability in accidents and benign response  under abuse conditions. • Standards help support the expectation that electrified vehicles  are subject to at least the same expectations. • Standards for ICE based vehicles developed over 100 years – are effective in ensuring vehicles are robust & hazards are managed  – occupants can survive accident scenarios that are survivable. • These standards have been augmented to account for the  electrification component that comes with elevated voltage and  significant amounts of stored electrical energy. • New risks in these electrified vehicles need to be considered in  the design and development• The task of writing and then proving out these standards – slow and laborious process with stakeholders coming together,  putting aside individual interests putting aside individual interests – publish a tool that is effective but flexible enough to consider  different technologies 4
  5. 5. Introduction‐2• Standards documents for batteries and other vehicle  electrification components.  electrification components• Issues to improve standards robustness, consistency and  universality. • American National Standards Institute (ANSI) through the Electric  Vehicles Standards Panel  (EVSP) has identified gaps ( )• Standards only effective if test methods satisfy intent consistently. • Some of the first organizations to encounter this issue while  implementing new test methods are third party test agencies.  p g p y g – build or acquire the specialized equipment – develop the skills and methods that minimize test risk, and develop  consistent and effective testing.  – test method shortcomings and opportunities for improvement are  g pp p discovered• Issues TÜV SÜD has resolved to make nail penetration abuse  testing effective.• Large format cells of many descriptions analyzed for the effects of  Large format cells of many descriptions analyzed for the effects of parameters on the reaction to abuse test conditions.  5
  6. 6. Abuse Testing of Lithium‐Ion Cells gRole of TÜV SÜD  • Third party, ISO 17025 certified, global testing company. Third party, ISO 17025 certified, global testing company.• Abuse tests establish reaction of cells, modules or complete batteries to  conditions exceeding those expected to be encountered in normal use.• Data used by battery manufacturers and OEMs for design decision making• Lithium‐ion energy storage devices need to prove compliance, – little operational track record over many years of service, under abuse  conditions. • TÜV SÜD, is privy to an overview of cell technology trends that cell, battery  and OEM organizations may not see due to their focused efforts. • Individual companies are often immersed in one technology family Individual companies are often immersed in one technology family.• Would be loath to change direction based only on reports of more progress  with competing technologies. • Reports from independent testing agencies from a general point of view. – the technology is improving the technology is improving,  – boost overall confidence for the electric vehicle market and customers. 6
  7. 7. Available Standards & Practices‐1• Many tests covering electrical, mechanical and thermal/environmental abuse that are used to gauge  product robustness. • Mechanical abuse tests cover mechanisms as nail penetration, crush, drop, impact or shock and vibration.  Mechanical abuse tests cover mechanisms as nail penetration, crush, drop, impact or shock and vibration.• Simulate the actual use and abuse conditions that may be beyond the normal safe operating limits [2]. • Nail penetration is typically the most reactive of all the mechanical abuse tests• Frequently used to assess cell robustness with short test turnaround time. • Three principle nail penetration test standards:  Three principle nail penetration test standards: – United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC),  – Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE),  – Automotive Industry Standard of the People’s Republic of China.• Most commonly requested nail penetration tests for automotive batteries: os co o y eques ed a pe e a o es s o au o o e ba e es – SAE J2464 section 4.3.3 [3] and FreedomCAR through SAND 2005‐3123 section 3.2 [2]. • Nail penetration testing is also described in QC/T 743‐2006, Lithium‐ion Batteries for Electric Vehicles,  Automotive Industry Standard of the People’s Republic of China [4]. • The Japan Storage Battery Association (JSBA) has a Guideline for Safety Evaluation on Secondary Lithium  Cells [5].  – primarily for small size portable electrical appliances which use cells smaller than 5 Ah.  – In contrast, most cells for automotive PHEV and EV applications are greater than 5 Ah and reach as high as 75 Ah.  – Nail diameter in JSBA is specified as between 2.5 to 5 mm with no nail material nor nail speed specified.  – In contrast, both SAE J2464 section 4.3.3 and SAND 2005‐3123 section 3.2 specify one nail diameter and mild steel  I t t b th SAE J2464 ti 4 3 3 d SAND 2005 3123 ti 3 2 if il di t d ild t l with nail speed greater than 8 cm/s for single cells.  7
  8. 8. Available Standards & Practices‐2• SAE and SAND tests do not present pass and fail criteria, • SBA requires that no explosion and no fire result from the test.  q p• QC/T 743‐2006 section 6.2.12.7 provides for two nail diameters of 10 and 40 mm and no nail speed  but it also requires no explosion and no fire.• Test specifications are open to interpretation in methodology due to: – the short history of lithium ion battery development,  – large ampere‐hour and pouch prismatic cells large ampere‐hour and pouch prismatic cells• Test methods were standardized at TUV SUD driven by significant uncontrolled variations• Since 2009, TÜV SÜD, has pursued a path of continuous test methodology improvement for the cell  penetration testing. • Accredited TÜV SÜD test procedure used to test hundreds of large format lithium ion cells.• Scope does not begin to cover all cells from all manufacturers ‐ it is a snapshot of a population of  nail penetration tests conducted at TÜV SÜD.• This work is different from what is typically found in literature [6‐15] in that it covers commercial  large format cells rather than experimental low capacity cells. • The equipment and safe practices used have been developed specifically and exclusively for these  q p p p p y y tests. • A large number of tests are carried out on a variety of cells as opposed to a few tests. 8
  9. 9. Drive to Standardize• Failed cell or battery tests in 3rd party testing ‐> subsequent ripple effect.  – Ripple effect for phone call or email that implies that ‘The product failed the  test so the test method must be wrong’ or ‘another test organization did the  h h d b ’ ‘ h dd h same test and the product passed there so you must be wrong’.  – Resolution consumes significant resources to explain test results – Most test organizations work hard to ensure test equipment, methods and  facilities are robust and consistent.  – The benefit is that proving competence when called upon is easily and  The benefit is that proving competence when called upon is easily and confidently carried out. • The SAE/FreedomCAR cell penetration test was selected as an ideal early  candidate for this kind of improvement effort. • TÜV SÜD performs tests to customer requirements. • The tests conducted have been selected by the customer as being  The tests conducted have been selected by the customer as being application relevant.  • When standard tests are not deemed application relevant, TÜV SÜD  works with customers to develop tests that are suited to the  requirements. • It is not the role of TÜV SÜD to pass judgment on cell or battery designs. I i h l f TÜV SÜD j d ll b d i 9
  10. 10. Table 1: EUCAR Hazard Severity Levels (HSL) TABLE I EUCAR HAZARD SEVERITY LEVELS (HSL) HAZARD SEVERITY DESCRIPTION CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA AND EFFECT LEVEL 0 No Effect No effect. No loss of functionality No damage or hazard; reversible loss of function. Replacement or re- 1 Passive Protection Activated setting of protection device is sufficient to restore normal functionality No hazard but damage to RESS*; irreversible loss of function. 2 g Defect/Damage Replacement or repair needed. R l t i d d Evidence of cell leakage or venting with RESS weight loss < 50% of 3 Minor Leakage/Venting electrolyte weight. Evidence of cell leakage or venting with RESS weight loss > 50% of 4 Major Leakage/Venting electrolyte weight. Loss of mechanical integrity of the RESS container, resulting in 5 Rupture release of contents. The kinetic energy of released material is not contents sufficient to cause physical damage external to the RESS. Ignition and sustained combustion of flammable gas or liquid 6 Fire or Flame (approximately more than one second). Sparks are not flames. Very fast release of energy sufficient to cause pressure waves and/or projectiles that may cause considerable structural and/or bodily 7 Explosion p damage, depending on the size of the RESS. The kinetic energy of g , p g gy flying debris from the RESS may be sufficient to cause damage as well. 10
  11. 11. Testing Response ‐ 1 g p• Cells that are abused may react in a number of ways from  no reaction to total and violent destruction.  no reaction to total and violent destruction• Both Sandia National Labs [2] and SAE J2464 [3] use the  EUCAR Hazard Severity Levels [16] to describe to what  extent a cell can react to a specific abuse.  extent a cell can react to a specific abuse• Table I depicts the Hazard Severity Levels as in SAE J2464.  Levels 5 and 6 are reversed in the Sandia table.• A cell undergoing a level 7 reaction is more than a designer A cell undergoing a level 7 reaction is more than a designer  would want to cope with in any battery pack. • Most OEM and battery companies look for level 2 as a  worst case response with level 3 as acceptable in some  worst case response with level 3 as acceptable in some circumstances. • There is no ‘pass’ or ‘fail’ criteria yet for this test.  11
  12. 12. Testing Response ‐ 2 g p• The risk of personal injury  with this level of testing is  ith thi l l f t ti i high and is therefore  conducted in purpose‐ designed chambers.  designed chambers• 3 chambers used at TÜV SÜD  in Newmarket, Ontario,  Canada for cell abuse testing.  C d f ll b t ti• Pressure vessel style for single  cell tests up to hazard severity  level (HSL) 7. • ISO Style chambers used in  Auburn Hills, MI for pack tests , p 12
  13. 13. Testing Response ‐ 3 g p• one of 3 concrete  bunkers at TÜV  b k TÜV SÜD in Garching,  Germany designed  to withstand HSL  ih d up to 7 for up to  full packs. • fully equipped  with gas cleaning,  p p multiple pressure  relief features and  blast proof  p viewports. 13
  14. 14. Test Methodology‐Development History gy p y Table 2: SAE J2464 Cell Penetration Test  Variables Parameter P t Measured value M d l Value V l Nail material mild steel diameter 3 mm (no tolerance) Point taper Point taper No values for length, included  No values for length included angle or surface finish Surface finish No value specified Straightness No value specified orientation Perpendicular to electrodes Penetration Rate ≥8 cm/s depth Through cell Constraints Preload None specified Supporting scheme None specified Electrical Resistance of path from DUT to ground Resistance of path from DUT to ground None specified None specified 14
  15. 15. Test Methodology‐Development History gy p y • For both cylindrical and prismatic cells. • However, most have been soft prismatic (pouch) cells for  nail penetration.   nail penetration • First TÜV SÜD test device was an air driven pneumatic  cylinder (see Figure 3) set at 100 cm/sec.  • High value for speed used to ensure that the minimum  nail velocity occurring during the ‘through the thickness’   il l i i d i h ‘h h h hi k ’ penetra on of cells as thick as 12 mm would be ˃  specified 8 cm/sec.  • This value pales in comparison to the 2,780 cm/sec that a  nail might be launched at when a vehicle travelling at 100  km/h impacts a nail. • It is not the purpose of this presentation to comment on the relevancy of this test velocity but  it is helpful to consider that a single cell, similar to a vehicle occupant, is not expected to be  it is helpful to consider that a single cell, similar to a vehicle occupant, is not expected to be subjected to a projectile hurled at that velocity. • Battery and vehicle as a system designed to protect an individual cell from this event. • May be achieved by crumple zones, energy absorbing layers or shielding materials or as part of  the vehicle. 15
  16. 16. Test Methodology‐Development History gy p y • Since pneumatic cylinder force was considered substantial at 1.7 kN, there was little  concern for a slowing down of the nail through the cell thickness to ˂8 cm/sec.  • An initial group of cells were tested in this manner but results could not be  An initial group of cells were tested in this manner but results could not be correlated to the cell suppliers’ similar penetration test data.  • Parameters in Table 2 were compared: between the TUV SUD values and cell  supplier’s values.  • The comparison showed that, like the SAE Recommended Practice, most of the  Th i h d h lik h SAE R d dP i f h parameters including the actual nail penetration speed were not measured at the  cell supplier.  • Several such as nail diameter and material were not in line with the SAE  requirements.: – Specifically, nail diameter was 5 mm where SAE J2464 specified 3mm  – Material was stainless steel where SAE J2464 specified mild steel. • To establish a starting point for those parameters lacking values, a review of the  To establish a starting point for those parameters lacking values a review of the tests conducted to date that for those with HSL response values of <5   16
  17. 17. Test Methodology‐Development History gy p y • Note that the HSL <5 was chosen since the test population size was small  with high HSL variability.  • The starting values listed in Table 3 were assigned. Th t ti l li t d i T bl 3 i d • With these starting values adopted, more cells were tested of selected  anode and cathode chemistries, % state of charge (SOC) and capacities.  • Mild steel nails had a high incidence of buckling in thicker cells. This was  Mild steel nails had a high incidence of buckling in thicker cells This was resolved by using high carbon steel nails made from commercial drill rod.  The resistivity of the high carbon steel is similar to the specified mild steel. 17
  18. 18. Test Methodology‐Development History gy p y Table 3: TUV SUD Values for SAE J2464 Cell Penetration Test  Variables Parameter P t Measured value M d l Value V l Nail material Tool steel (C1090) diameter 3 mm (no tolerance) Point taper Point taper 28o included angle included angle Surface finish Ra<1.6 Straightness Within 0.5mm within 100mm length orientation Perpendicular to test bed within  Perpendicular to test bed within 0.5mm Penetration Rate ≥8 cm/s, ˂8.5 c/s measured in free  space depth d th Through cell Th h ll Constraints Preload Customer selected Supporting scheme None specified Electrical Resistance of path from DUT to  Nail electrically isolated from DUT ground 18
  19. 19. Test Methodology‐Development History gy p y• Pneumatic nail driving system was capable for thin pouch type cells,  but questionable for thicker cells• Pneumatic system replaced with a hydraulically driven system• Capable of delivering 45 kN with more precise and accurate control  of velocity, acceleration and depth of penetration. • This set of measurements was then used on a further set of cells to  determine if the HSL was the same for pneumatic and hydraulic  p y systems. • Discrepancies were found under otherwise apparently identical  parameters. • Key differences in methodologies studied• In spite of all these test improvement efforts, the hydraulic system  In spite of all these test improvement efforts the hydraulic system HSLs were markedly different from that of the pneumatic system. • Further analysis was carried out to verify the velocities of the air  system and the hydraulic system using independent test methods. • High force of the hydraulic system was sufficient to overcome the  resistance of cells in up to 1 cm of cell thickness without loss of  resistance of cells in up to 1 cm of cell thickness without loss of velocity while pneumatic slowed down by up to 3cm/sec• Hydraulic system is the most robust and consistent for nail  penetration tests on pouch cells.  19
  20. 20. Penetration Test to Date• A total of over 250 cells have been subjected to the TUV SUD standard cell  p penetration test to date. • This paper examines the results of the tests as conducted. • In recognition of the proprietary nature of some of the data, no information about  cell manufacturer, specific size or electrochemistry is referenced. • The sample cells in these tests had the following attributes: The sample cells in these tests had the following attributes: – Soft and hard pouch prismatic – Cylindrical  – Nameplate capacity from 8 Ah to 60 Ah – %SOC from 60 to 100 %SOC from 60 to 100 – Undisclosed cathode, anode, separator and electrolyte formulations• The test method and equipment include: – Both pneumatic (earlier method) and hydraulic – Standard nail configuration (material, diameter, point angle & finish, alignment) g ( , ,p g , g ) – Standard apparatus to support the DUT – Both restrained and unrestrained cell fixturing – 10,000 liter abuse chamber – Multi channel data acquisition system for DUT parameters (voltage, temperatures, internal  pressure) and abuse apparatus parameters such as nail velocity. ) d b t t h il l it 20
  21. 21. Penetration Test to Date• The data from all of these tests have been analyzed to search for trends and influencing factors on  HSL. • Reporting of HSL in each test is not an exact takeoff of the 0‐7 rating EUCAR system.  – For example, the range 0‐2 is used to report any HSL in that range. • In order to distinguish between the individual values in the range, a post abuse test functional test  would be required and this rarely requested. Objectively, the reasoning may be that whether a cell  is a 0, 1 or 2 HSL has little influence on the criteria for the pack engineer regarding safety when  , p g g g y compared to HSL > 3. • Similarly, the range 3‐5 represents any of the three individual HSLs in that range.  – Since 3 and 4 are a function of the electrolyte weight loss and electrolyte weight is seldom disclosed,  distinguishing between them is not definitively possible.  – Similarly HSL 5 calls for rupture which can be argued to have happened for both 3 and 4.  y p g pp – HSLs 6 and 7 also present judgment quandaries since explosions have occurred with no flames and large  vapor clouds have ignited and burned out in fractions of a second.• Independent spark source was not used in any of these tests. • All tests in this population were conducted at room temperature. • It is known from other TUV SUD abuse tests conducted at 55oC that HSLs can be significantly higher It is known from other TUV SUD abuse tests conducted at 55 C, that HSLs can be significantly higher  than at room temperature. Accordingly, running these tests at the recommended maximum cell  operating temperature may be instructive.  21
  22. 22. Results• As a first indicator of confidence in the test method and cell quality,  data was sorted to search for the time dependent trend in HSL.  data was sorted to search for the time dependent trend in HSL• Acceptable HSL was selected as HSL≤3.  • Rationale for HSL≤3 => a largely favorable result while HSL>3  indicates more cell development work required if cell behavior at  indicates more cell development work required if cell behavior at HSL>3 cannot be managed by pack design or pack management. • Note HSL≤3 is a convenient decision level but does not take into  account that HSL=3 may in fact in some tests be an actual HSL=4  due to the possible interpretation latitude of the test result.• The penetration tests database makes possible analysis for more  questions such as: i) what effect does %SOC have on HSL, ii) what  effect does restraining the sample have versus unrestrained, iii) is  effect does restraining the sample have versus unrestrained iii) is there a difference between pneumatic and hydraulic methods, and  iv) how does nail velocity affect HSL.  22
  23. 23. Fig 5: HSL Trend over Time g• population of 182  p p 100 penetration test cells  90 selected for HSL less than  80 % of samples showing  HSL  ≤ 3 30-40 Ah, or equal to 3.  70 restrained, std test spec. 60• Except for the last data Except for the last data  50 point, trend of HSL for  40 HSL ≤ 3 HSL< 3 is favorable  30 direction over last 12  20 % quarters.  10• This trend is encouraging  0 10-1 10-2 10-3 10-4 11-1 11-2 11-3 11-4 12-1 12-2 and supports the  Year‐Quarter improvements made in the  improvements made in the test method.  23
  24. 24. Fig 6a: Effect of SOC on HSL _ restrained g _• %SOC at a selected cell  range of 30‐40 Ah on HSL  for restrained cells for a  population of 173  samples.  samples.• At 100% SOC in this cell  capacity range, from this  data, it is more likely that  the cell, when penetrated  h ll h d will have a >3 HSL  reaction than HSL<3. This  likelihood declines as SOC  declines and for this  population, all cells at  70% SOC had an HSL<3. 24
  25. 25. Fig 6b: Effect of SOC on HSL _ unrestrained g _• SOC on HSL for 44  unrestrained cells over  unrestrained cells over range of 8‐60 Ah. • For SOC of 100%, the  likelihood of HSL>3 is  almost the same as for  the larger population  in figure 6a while an  SOC of 60% had all 8  SOC of 60% had all 8 samples react with an  HSL<3. • Note 8 samples from a  population of 2 mfgrs,  4 Ah capacities and  similar chemistries.   25
  26. 26. Fig 7: Effect of Nail Speed on HSL g p• population of 258 samples. • 30‐40 Ah in the restrained  state and at >80% SOC. • All samples tested at 100  cm/s had an HSL >3. • Two thirds of the samples Two thirds of the samples  tested at 8 cm/s had an HSL  <3. • All the samples at 5.5 cm/s  had an HSL ≤ 3• However, the small lot of 4  samples tested at the very  slow 1.1 cm/s showed  slow 1 1 cm/s showed unexpected behavior in  that the lot had HSL>3.  26
  27. 27. Conclusion• The shortcomings of the standardized nail penetration abuse test are addressed  and a robust procedure has been developed.  p p• This method is utilized for abuse testing of hundreds of Li‐ion cells and the  following results are obtained: – In general, cells are exhibiting a trend of increasing robustness to abuse as measured by HSL  values over the last two and one half years in the TÜV SÜD population of nail penetration  tests. – Cells tested at lower SOCs of 60‐70% in this population are strongly showing HSLs < 3. – Nail velocity at 100 cm/s shows a strong tendency to produce HSLs > 3.• As a guideline for battery pack design it can be concluded that until cells are robust  enough to withstand high velocity projectiles, packs need to be designed to  enough to withstand high velocity projectiles packs need to be designed to protect the cells from these events. • From the population in these tests, there appears to be an opportunity for risk  reduction in the area of penetration abuse at high SOCs (90‐100%).• As a third party, ISO 17025 testing agency, TÜV SÜD is committed to help develop  As a third party ISO 17025 testing agency TÜV SÜD is committed to help develop robust and reliable testing processes for the advanced battery industry.  27
  28. 28. Acknowledgement g• The Authors would like to thank the personnel of  p TÜV SÜD Canada, Newmarket, ON, for their role in  conducting the tests. • The invaluable comments of Mr. Malcolm Shemmans  are also greatly appreciated. • The work was supported in part by the Natural  Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada  (NSERC) 28
  29. 29. References1. Standardization Roadmap for Electric Vehicles, ANSI EVSP ver. 1, 2012. Available:  http://www.ansi.org/standards_activities/standards_boards_panels/evsp/overview.aspx?menuid=32. FreedomCAR Electrical Energy Storage System Abuse Test Manual for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications, Sandia  FreedomCAR Electrical Energy Storage System Abuse Test Manual for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications, Sandia National Laboratories SAND2005‐3123, 2005. Available: http://prod.sandia.gov/techlib/access‐control.cgi/2005/053123.pdf3. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) Safety and Abuse Testing, SAE International J2464,  2009. 4. Lithium‐ion Batteries for Electric Vehicles, Automotive Industry Standard of the Peoples Republic of China QC/T 743, 2006.  5. Guideline for Safety Evaluation on Secondary Lithium Cells, The Japan Storage Battery Association SBA G 1101, 1995.6. R. Spotnitz and J. Franklin, “Abuse behavior of high‐power, lithium‐ion cells,” J. Power Sources, vol. 113, no. 1, pp. 81–100, January  2003.7. M. Takahashi, H. Ohtsuka, K. Akuto, and Y. Sakurai, “Confirmation of long‐term cyclability and high thermal stability of LiFePO4 in  prismatic lithium‐ion cells,” J. Electrochem. Soc., vol. 152, no. 5, pp. A899–A904, May 2005.8. T. Sato, K. Banno, T. Maruo, and R. Nozu, “New design for a safe lithium‐ion gel polymer battery,” J. Power Sources, vol. 152, no. 1‐2,   pp. 264–271, December 2005.9. C. Hu, and X. Li, Non‐flammable electrolytes based on trimethyl phosphate solvent for lithium‐ion batteries,” Trans. Nonferrous Met.  Soc. China, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 1380 1387, December 2005. Soc China vol 15 no 6 pp 1380–1387 December 200510. H.  Lee, M. G. Kim, and J. Cho, “Olivine LiCoPO4 phase grown LiCoO2 cathode material for high density Li batteries,” Electrochem.  Commun., vol. 9, no. 1, pp 149–154, January 2007.11. M. Yang, B. Lin, S. Yeh, and J. Tsai, “Design of high power lithium ion battery for HEV application,” World Electr. Veh. J., vol. 1, no. 1,  pp. 161–164, 2007.12. K. Xu, B. Deveney, K. Nechev, Y. Lam, T. R. Jow, “Evaluating LiBOB/Lactone electrolytes in large‐format lithium‐ion cells based on  nickelate and iron phosphate,” J. Electrochem. Soc., vol. 155, no. 12, pp. A959–A964, 2008.13. C. Doh et al., “Thermal and electrochemical behaviour of C/LixCoO2 cell during safety test,” J. Power Sources, vol. 175, no. 2, pp. 881– 885, January 2008.14. R. Liang et al., “Fabrication and electrochemical properties of lithium‐ion batteries for power tools,” J. Power Sources, vol. 184, no. 2,  pp. 598–603, October 2008.15. H. Maleki and J. N. Howard, “Internal short circuit in Li‐ion cells,” J. Power Sources, vol. 191, no. 2, pp 568–574, June 2009.16. W. Josefowitz, et. al. “Assessment and Testing of Advanced Energy Storage Systems for Propulsion–European Testing Report,” in  Proceedings of the 21st Worldwide Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition, Monaco, 2005, p. 6. Proceedings of the 21st Worldwide Battery Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Monaco 2005 p 6 29

×