CVEN 689 Context Sensitive Solutions in Transportation Planning,                            Environmental Analysis and Des...
• Course introduction/overview/expectations   • Class project assignment - students’ favorite streets (and why) for next c...
• Instructor clarificationsWeek 12 - CSS project checklist and the approval process   • Review of CSS process and design c...
disciplinary action including a grade penalty, up to and including an F in the course, suspension, dismissal,and expulsion...
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Syllabus css course - 15 weeks 072408

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Syllabus for 15 week graduate course on Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS). Created for UTCM Report #08-14-03 "Making Mobility Improvements a Community Asset: Transportation Improvements Using Context-Sensitive Solutions"

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Syllabus css course - 15 weeks 072408

  1. 1. CVEN 689 Context Sensitive Solutions in Transportation Planning, Environmental Analysis and DesignTimes Lecture: T-THInstructors: Brian Bochner Beverly Storey Phone: 458-3516 Phone: 845-7217 Email: b-bochner@tamu.edu Email: b-storey@tamu.eduReference Books: 1. AASHTO, Guide for Achieving Flexibility in Highway Design, July 2004. 2. AASHTO, A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, 2004 3. FHWA, Flexibility in Highway Design, 1997 http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/flex/ 4. ITE, Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban Thoroughfares in Walkable Communities, March 2006 http://www.ite.org/bookstore/RP036.pdf 5. NCHRP 480, A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions, 2002. http://onlinepubs.trb.org/Onlinepubs/nchrp/nchrp_rpt_480.pdf 6. MassHighways, Project Development and Design Guide, 2006 http://www.mhd.state.ma.us/default.asp?pgid=content/designGuide&sid=about 7. DVRPC, Smart Transportation Guidebook, 2008 http://www.dvrpc.org/asp/pubs/reports/08030A.pdf 8. TxDOT Landscape and Aesthetic Design Manual, 2007 http://onlinemanuals.txdot.gov/txdotmanuals/lad/index.htm 9. Others to be determinedCourse Description: This course focuses on the concept of context sensitive solutions (CSS) as applied toplanning, analyzing environmental impacts, and design of transportation facilities. It is particularly orientedtoward CSS applications to facilitate community acceptance of mobility improvement projects. Studentswill learn and how to build consensus, make transportation facilities compatible and supportive oftransportation and other local objectives, the environment, and the surrounding area. The course will focuson the concepts of CSS in a lecture and discussion format, book and other readings, and review of relevantliterature on the subject. This classic approach will be complimented with some exercises to illustratespecific principles involved in the subject matter.Course Format: The course will be organized in a typical lecture/discussion format. Topics to be coveredin the course are arranged by week. Students are expected to have completed the assigned readings at thetime of class. Each class period will include substantial discussion, with a focus on examples andimplications of written materials. Discussions will focus policy and design implications associated with theconcept of context sensitive solutions.Course Requirements:Assignments 15%Class participation 30%Exams 15%Class Project 40% Total 100%Course Learning Objectives:At the conclusion of this course, each student should be able to perform the following:• Provide an overview of CSS concepts and applications for transportation facilities,• Apply these concepts to the planning and design process of transportation facilities.Course Outline:Week 1 - Introduction • What is CSS? History of CSS, current FHWA initiatives, examples of roads and context integration 1
  2. 2. • Course introduction/overview/expectations • Class project assignment - students’ favorite streets (and why) for next classWeek 2 • Students’ favorite streets and why • CSS defined - integration of stakeholder objectives • Benefits of CSSWeek 3 - Project development defined • Whose objectives are considered? • CSS role • Stakeholder roles and involvementWeek 4 - CSS and environmental analysis • NEPA and how it relates to CSS • Environmental impact areas • CSS as proactive way to address environmental considerationsWeek 5 Creating a context sensitive solution – what does it take, who does it, and why? • Characteristics of a successful context sensitive solution • CSS project needs • Multidisciplinary project teamingWeek 6 – The Context – Physical and Social • Components of context – physical characteristics • Components of Context – social and economic characteristicsWeek 7 - Constructive involvement of stakeholders • Who are the stakeholders and types? • Importance of involvement • Methods for involvement (workshop, charrette, focus group, meetings, 1-on-1, newsletters, etc.) • Problems, issues, needs, considerations, objectives, opportunities • What constitutes a need?Week 8 - Mock CSS project startup workshop or charrette • Purpose/need • Team • Stakeholder involvement process (structure per needs, collaborative, tools) • Public relations (guest speaker)Week 9 – Making a Project Multimodal • Defining multimodal and applicability • What makes a “complete street?” • What is appropriate? Placemaking with CSS • What is “sense of place” and placemaking? • Components and applicability • TechniquesWeek 10 - Developing a compatible, supportive design • Process • Identifying needs, objectives, opportunities, constraints, alternatives • How to make a design compatible, supportive • Flexibility, creativity • Evaluation, performance measures, criteria • Selection • ExerciseWeek 11 - CSS in construction, operations, maintenance • How CSS relates to construction, operations, maintenance • Optimizing CSS considerations Discussions about class term project • Student questions about term project in response to material presented to date 2
  3. 3. • Instructor clarificationsWeek 12 - CSS project checklist and the approval process • Review of CSS process and design components • Deciding when to use what pieces • CSS and the project approval process • Does CSS facilitate the approval process? Using CSS in practice • Review of CSS process and design components • Deciding when to use what pieces • CSS and the project approval process • Does CSS facilitate the approval process?Week 13 – CSS Examples and class critiques • Examples of projects with CSS backgrounds • Class initiated critiques and discussionWeek 14 – Presentation of Class Projects with discussionWeek 15 – Presentation of Class Projects with discussionOFFICIAL NOTICESHomework: There will be homework assignments, worth 10 points each. Unless otherwise noted,homework will be due at the beginning of the class, one week after it is assigned. Homework that ishanded in late will have the following penalties:• 1 class late -- 20% off corrected grade;• 2 classes late -- 40% off corrected grade;• 3 classes or more late -- not accepted.Homework should be prepared in a professional manner as follows:• One side of a standard 8.5x11 paper with all sheets stapled together.• Your name, course, section number, homework number, and page number should be printed at the top ofeach page.Group: Forty percent of your final grade will come from group projects. The class will be divided intogroups, depending upon the number of students in the class. Each group will be assigned to prepare a CSSapplication using the concepts and techniques discussed in class. The other members of your group alsowill be asked to assess your contribution to the group effort. Individual grades will then be adjusted basedupon the amount of contribution the individual made to the group effort. For example, if the your groupproject scores a 90 on your project, but your group members feel you contributed only 50% to the totalgroup effort, then you will receive a grade of 50% * 90 = 45.Therefore, it is important for you to participate fully in all of your group’s activities.Specific information and instructions regarding this project will be provided when assigned.Academic: Many of the handouts used in this course are copyrighted. “Handouts” means all materialsgenerated for this class, which include but are not limited to syllabi, quizzes, exams, in-class materials, etc.Because these materials are copyrighted, a student does not have the right to copy the handouts unless theinstructor expressly grants permission.Honesty: No form of scholastic dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, etc.) will be tolerated. As commonlydefined, plagiarism consists of passing off as one’s own the ideas, words, writings, etc., which belong toanother. In accordance with this definition, a student is committing plagiarism if he/she copies the work ofanother person and turns it in as his/her own, even if he/she should have the permission of that person.Plagiarism is one of the worst academic sins, because the plagiarist destroys the trust among colleagues.The purpose of homework in this section is to help you learn the course material.Working in groups on homework is permitted and encouraged. However, each person must turn in aseparate and unique write-up prepared by his/her own hand. This means that the problem description, stepstaken to solve the problem must be generated by each person individually. By University regulations,copying another person’s homework is considered plagiarism, and is not permitted. All examinations willbe closed book. Cheating on quizzes and exams will NOT be tolerated. Cheating will be reported andhandled in accordance with the University Regulations, Section 42. Violation of this rule can result in 3
  4. 4. disciplinary action including a grade penalty, up to and including an F in the course, suspension, dismissal,and expulsion from Texas A&M University. If you have any questions regarding plagiarism or other formsof scholastic dishonesty, please consult the latest issue of the Texas A&M University Student Rules, underthe section 20 which can also be found at http://student-rules.tamu.edu.E-mail: Communication via e-mail (questions on homework, exams, class examples, etc.) is encouraged.As much as possible, questions submitted via e-mail will be answered by the end of the day they arereceived. Unless otherwise requested by the student, the instructor will distribute the question(anonymously) and answer to all students who have given the instructor their e-mail address. E-mail mayalso be used to distribute clarifications on class lectures, homework, exams and problem solutions. Use ofe-mail is strictly voluntary. If you would like to receive course-related e-mail, send the instructor an e-mailmessage, indicating your name, the course, the section, and your e-mail address.ADA Policy: The Americans with Disabilities Act is a federal anti-discrimination statute that providescomprehensive civil rights protections for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislationrequires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonableaccommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring accommodation, pleasecontact Services forStudents with Disabilities, Koldus 126, 845-1637. 4

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