Helping People Succeed
INTERCULTURAL MENTORING NETWORK          NUTS AND BOLTS TRAININGLink to Administrator’s kit –http://alliescanada.ca/how-we...
WHAT IS MENTORING?Mentoring vs. Coaching                            Mentor                       CoachFocus               ...
OBJECTIVES1. Provide overview of the partnership model2. Define and describe role of Coordinator3. Define and describe ava...
PARTNERSHIP MODEL•   Coordinator in each community•   Coordinator is responsible for mentor and mentee recruitment•   JVS ...
PARTNERSHIP MODEL            PARTNERSTRIEC     JVS TORONTO        PINs                             -Coordinators          ...
ROLE OF COORDINATOR• Main liaison in each community• Mentor and mentee recruitment• Provide mentee and mentor resources• C...
AVAILABLE RESOURCES•   Program Administration Guide•   Mentor Resource Kit•   Mentee Resource Kit•   Mentor/Mentee Recruit...
PILLARS OF THE MENTORSHIP PROGRAM             Part 1: Program Planning                                                    ...
PROGRAM COMPONENTS•   Mentor recruitment, screening and selection•   Mentee recruitment, screening and selection•   Mentor...
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONSector specific mentoring groups:•   5 full group-mentoring sessions (each session will be for 3 hours)...
PART 1: PROGRAM PLANNINGA well planned program enhances success as it will meet theorganizations’ and people needs.Key asp...
PROGRAM PLANNINGMission:Group mentoring is a unique form of support, where people looking for work(mentees) can connect wi...
PROGRAM PLANNINGExpected Outcomes:•Mentees will be better informed and equipped to obtain suitable employment in  or relat...
PROGRAM PLANNINGMentoring Objectives:Through group mentoring, mentees can:•   Learn about Canadian workplace culture and i...
PROGRAM PLANNINGMentee Benefits:• Increased self-knowledge and awareness• Obtain strategic tools for ongoing career develo...
PROGRAM PLANNINGMentor Benefits:• Increased self-knowledge and self awareness• Optimize coaching and mentoring skills• Bui...
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESJVS Toronto:• Train Coordinator and provide support (including job search skillsand resources, r...
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESCoordinator:(Already covered on slide # 7)Mentor:Ref page 7 of Program Administrator Kit (online...
MENTORING PROGRAM MODEL                                   PROGRAM GOALS                Mentors Enroll                     ...
APPRECIATION PROCESS• Mentor recognition/appreciation events• Mentor appreciation certificates• Mentee participation certi...
PART 2: MENTOR AND MENTEE INTAKE PROCESSES Identifying, selecting and matching participants maximizes the learning. The ef...
PART 2: MENTOR AND MENTEE INTAKE PROCESSES  Mentee Intake Process:  • Carefully select mentees who are ready to pursue an ...
MENTEE SUITABILITYAn internationally trained professional who is new to Canada (less than 3years in Canada) and looking fo...
PART 2: MENTOR AND MENTEE INTAKE PROCESSES Mentor Intake Process: • Carefully select mentors who have the skills and knowl...
MENTOR SUITABILITYA Mentor is a professional working in a similar profession andindustry who can guide newcomers in their ...
PART 3: ORIENTATION, TRAINING, SUPPORT, MONITORING     Preparing mentors and mentees for a mentoring     relationship assu...
MENTOR ORIENTATION TRAINING (SAMPLE)• Overview• Introductions• Excites and Concerns• Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship (...
MENTEE ORIENTATION TRAINING (SAMPLE)• Overview• Introductions• Excites and Concerns• Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship• ...
LAUNCH OF MENTORING SESSION• Mentors and mentees meet• Group establishes relationships and set expectations• Group discuss...
CONDUCT OF MENTORING SESSIONS• Assist in arranging accommodation for mentoring  sessions• Check with mentor for evaluation...
SUPPORT• Monitor to ensure that the relationships are on track• Respond to questions/queries from mentors and  mentees• Sh...
PART 4: EVALUATION, REPORTING AND ADJUSTMENT The evaluation captures progress and outcomes. Direct feedback from participa...
OBSTACLES TO SUCCESSFUL MENTORING• Mentor and mentees under or unprepared• Mentor’s lack of sufficient knowledge/awareness...
“We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give”       Winston Churchhill
CONTACT INFORMATIONDebroy ChanManager, Mentoring Services(416) 649 1631dchan@jvstoronto.orgFarah AlizadehahiEmployment Cou...
Jewish Vocational Service                                       Head Office                          74 Tycos Drive, Toron...
PINs "Nuts & Bolts" Group Mentoring powerpoint (October 30, 2012)
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PINs "Nuts & Bolts" Group Mentoring powerpoint (October 30, 2012)

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PINs "Nuts & Bolts" Group Mentoring powerpoint (October 30, 2012)

  1. 1. Helping People Succeed
  2. 2. INTERCULTURAL MENTORING NETWORK NUTS AND BOLTS TRAININGLink to Administrator’s kit –http://alliescanada.ca/how-we-can-help/mentoring/group-mentoring/
  3. 3. WHAT IS MENTORING?Mentoring vs. Coaching Mentor CoachFocus Individual PerformanceRole Facilitator with no agenda Specific agendaRelationship Self selecting Comes with jobSource of Influence Perceived value PositionPersonal returns Affirmation/learning Teamwork/perform.Arena Life Task relatedMatt M. Starcevich, Ph.D., CEO, Centre for Coaching & Mentoring, Inc.http://www.coachingandmentoring.com/Articles/mentoring.html
  4. 4. OBJECTIVES1. Provide overview of the partnership model2. Define and describe role of Coordinator3. Define and describe available resources4. Describe group mentoring program using four pillars5. Describe and discuss some of the obstacles to a successful mentoring experience6. Questions and answers
  5. 5. PARTNERSHIP MODEL• Coordinator in each community• Coordinator is responsible for mentor and mentee recruitment• JVS Toronto staff trains coordinator and provides support• JVS Toronto staff team responsible for, reporting, evaluation, financial management and provision of support for delivery of the mentoring program• JVS Toronto hosts cross-cultural events, including training workshops, program launches and recognition events• TRIEC will provide support and assist with provision of training materials and resources as needed• A representative of each community/partnering agency is required to participate on the program steering committee
  6. 6. PARTNERSHIP MODEL PARTNERSTRIEC JVS TORONTO PINs -Coordinators -Mentors -Mentees STEERING COMMITTEE
  7. 7. ROLE OF COORDINATOR• Main liaison in each community• Mentor and mentee recruitment• Provide mentee and mentor resources• Conduct orientation/training sessions for mentors and mentees• Assist in arrangements for launch• Assist in coordination of mentoring sessions• Assist in providing follow-up support to mentees and mentors• Follow-up with mentor and mentees re: Completion ofevaluation forms as needed• Assist in arranging cross cultural events• Attend coordinator meetings
  8. 8. AVAILABLE RESOURCES• Program Administration Guide• Mentor Resource Kit• Mentee Resource Kit• Mentor/Mentee Recruitment Flyers• Mentor/Mentee Application• Consent Forms• Partnership Agreement• Evaluation Forms
  9. 9. PILLARS OF THE MENTORSHIP PROGRAM Part 1: Program Planning Part 2: Mentor and Mentee Intake Processes A well planned program enhances success as it will meet the organizations’ and people needs. Key aspects include: Identifying, selecting and matching participants maximizes the learning. The effort is to find the best • Vision and expected outcomes available match for development goals. • Objectives for the program • Determine program benefits Key aspects include: • Roles & responsibilities • Mentoring Program Model • Recruit mentors and recruit mentees • Appreciation processes for the participants • Match mentors and mentees Part 3: Orientation, Training, Support, Monitoring Part 4: Evaluation, Reporting and AdjustmentPreparing mentors and mentees for a mentoring The evaluation captures progress and outcomes.relationship assures the transfer of knowledge and Direct feedback from participants, both qualitative andskills. quantitative, that goals have been achieved will meetKey aspects include: the needs of the participants and demonstrate the value of mentoring.• Orient and prepare mentors Key aspects include:• Orient and prepare mentees • Outcomes and satisfaction survey • Report outcomes & satisfaction • Review and implement continuous improvements
  10. 10. PROGRAM COMPONENTS• Mentor recruitment, screening and selection• Mentee recruitment, screening and selection• Mentor Orientation/Training• Mentee Orientation/Training• Program Launch• Program Wrap up• Mentoring Sessions• Support• Evaluation
  11. 11. PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONSector specific mentoring groups:• 5 full group-mentoring sessions (each session will be for 3 hours); not including the launch• Sessions held over a 10-week periodEach session will consist of the following participants:• One mentor• 4-6 mentees
  12. 12. PART 1: PROGRAM PLANNINGA well planned program enhances success as it will meet theorganizations’ and people needs.Key aspects include: • Vision and expected outcomes • Objectives for the program • Determine program benefits • Roles & responsibilities • Mentoring Program Model • Appreciation processes for the participants
  13. 13. PROGRAM PLANNINGMission:Group mentoring is a unique form of support, where people looking for work(mentees) can connect with a professional working in their field (mentor) overa period of five group meetings.Group mentoring provides job seekers with a quick and effective way toenhance their networks and makes excellent use of our volunteer mentorresources.
  14. 14. PROGRAM PLANNINGExpected Outcomes:•Mentees will be better informed and equipped to obtain suitable employment in or related to their fields of expertise.•They will obtain the sector-specific information and knowledge necessary to assist them in establishing their careers in Canada.•Through exposure to their mentor’s personal and professional experiences, mentees will gain valuable information on how to pursue their goal of being employed in an appropriate field.•The mentees will gain the confidence and motivation required to actively pursue their employment goals.• Mentees will begin to build and maintain their network within the group.•Through an informal support and networking group, mentees will be encouraged to explore various avenues that may facilitate their gainful employment.
  15. 15. PROGRAM PLANNINGMentoring Objectives:Through group mentoring, mentees can:• Learn about Canadian workplace culture and industry trends• Identify educational and technical skills required to meet market demands• Receive guidance through the licensing and accreditation process• Acquire support through the job search process• Establish professional networks• Improve professional terminology• Build confidence in a new culture
  16. 16. PROGRAM PLANNINGMentee Benefits:• Increased self-knowledge and awareness• Obtain strategic tools for ongoing career development andsuccess• Enhance communication skills• Develop professional etiquette• Identify talents needed in the Canadian workplace• Build their network for work and career success• Become employed in their field of expertise
  17. 17. PROGRAM PLANNINGMentor Benefits:• Increased self-knowledge and self awareness• Optimize coaching and mentoring skills• Build leadership excellence• Dialogue with and learn from the experiences of internationallytrained people• Share knowledge and wisdom and explore new ideas andperspectives• Learn about and contribute to the community
  18. 18. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESJVS Toronto:• Train Coordinator and provide support (including job search skillsand resources, referral to other programs)• Reporting, evaluation, financial management and hands ondelivery of the mentoring program including facilitation of matches• Host cross cultural events, including training workshopsTRIEC:• Provide support and assist with provision of training materials andresources as neededProgram Steering Committee:• A representative of each community/partnering agency is requiredto participate on the program advisory committee
  19. 19. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESCoordinator:(Already covered on slide # 7)Mentor:Ref page 7 of Program Administrator Kit (online copy)Mentee:Ref page 7 of Program Administrator Kit (online copy)
  20. 20. MENTORING PROGRAM MODEL PROGRAM GOALS Mentors Enroll Mentees Enroll Mentors/mentees matched Mentor and mentees Orientation Mentoring agreement established 5 - meetingsMentor’s follow-up & evaluations Mentee’s follow-up Agreements conclude & Evaluation
  21. 21. APPRECIATION PROCESS• Mentor recognition/appreciation events• Mentor appreciation certificates• Mentee participation certificates• Process for mentees to acknowledge the efforts of mentors• Thank you letters to mentors and mentees• Share appreciation ideas
  22. 22. PART 2: MENTOR AND MENTEE INTAKE PROCESSES Identifying, selecting and matching participants maximizes the learning. The effort is to find the best available match for development goals. Key aspects include: • Recruit mentors and recruit mentees • Match mentors and mentees
  23. 23. PART 2: MENTOR AND MENTEE INTAKE PROCESSES Mentee Intake Process: • Carefully select mentees who are ready to pursue an active job search • Conduct mentee interview • Use mentee goals as the reference for matching mentor with mentees (see procedures on page 11 of online Program Administrator Kit)
  24. 24. MENTEE SUITABILITYAn internationally trained professional who is new to Canada (less than 3years in Canada) and looking for guidance on how to find employment intheir profession and industry. • Previously worked in their profession for at least two years • Have no or limited Canadian experience in their profession • Have had or is currently undergoing job search training and has Canadian style resume and cover letter • English language proficiency at CLB level 7 or higher • Able to spend at least twenty hours a week in active job search • Highly motivated and committed to looking for work in their profession in Canada • Responsive and willing to act on the guidance offered by their mentor • Able and Committed to attending all mentoring sessions
  25. 25. PART 2: MENTOR AND MENTEE INTAKE PROCESSES Mentor Intake Process: • Carefully select mentors who have the skills and knowledge needed by the mentees • Conduct mentor interview • Use mentee goals as the reference for matching mentor with mentees (see procedures on page 12 of online Program Administrator Kit)
  26. 26. MENTOR SUITABILITYA Mentor is a professional working in a similar profession andindustry who can guide newcomers in their job search process • Have successful professional work experience in Canada (preferably 2 years or more) • Be sensitive to challenges faced by newcomers to Canada • Have good interpersonal communication skills • Enjoy sharing knowledge • Understand Canadian workplace culture • Know skills required to meet market demands • Be aware of licensing issues specific to their occupation/profession • Be in good standing with relevant regulatory bodies in their industry • Make a time commitment to attend all sessions
  27. 27. PART 3: ORIENTATION, TRAINING, SUPPORT, MONITORING Preparing mentors and mentees for a mentoring relationship assures the transfer of knowledge and skills. Key aspects include: • Orient and prepare mentors • Orient and prepare mentees
  28. 28. MENTOR ORIENTATION TRAINING (SAMPLE)• Overview• Introductions• Excites and Concerns• Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship (see page 22 ofmentor/mentee kit)• Roles, Responsibilities• Background Preparation for the Mentoring Action Plan andAgreement• Coaching Technique for Managing Conflict
  29. 29. MENTEE ORIENTATION TRAINING (SAMPLE)• Overview• Introductions• Excites and Concerns• Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship• Roles, Responsibilities• Background Preparation for the Mentoring Action Planand Agreement• Working with a Mentor
  30. 30. LAUNCH OF MENTORING SESSION• Mentors and mentees meet• Group establishes relationships and set expectations• Group discuss and agree on meeting schedule
  31. 31. CONDUCT OF MENTORING SESSIONS• Assist in arranging accommodation for mentoring sessions• Check with mentor for evaluations and attendance• Check in to ensure that sessions are going smoothly
  32. 32. SUPPORT• Monitor to ensure that the relationships are on track• Respond to questions/queries from mentors and mentees• Share job postings and job fair information with group• Refer mentors and mentees to other resources for job search and other support• Discuss mentees’ improvements with mentors• Determine if efforts are delivering results
  33. 33. PART 4: EVALUATION, REPORTING AND ADJUSTMENT The evaluation captures progress and outcomes. Direct feedback from participants, both qualitative and quantitative, that goals have been achieved will meet the needs of the participants and demonstrate the value of mentoring. Key aspects include: • Outcomes and satisfaction survey • Report outcomes & satisfaction • Review and implement continuous improvements
  34. 34. OBSTACLES TO SUCCESSFUL MENTORING• Mentor and mentees under or unprepared• Mentor’s lack of sufficient knowledge/awareness of newcomer obstacles• Mentor’s lack of adequate professional contacts• Mentor too busy• Unreasonable expectation of mentees• Mentees not trained in job search strategies and techniques• Mentees not actively job searching• Mentor and mentees not fully utilizing resources at their disposal, including mentoring coach
  35. 35. “We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give” Winston Churchhill
  36. 36. CONTACT INFORMATIONDebroy ChanManager, Mentoring Services(416) 649 1631dchan@jvstoronto.orgFarah AlizadehahiEmployment Counsellor/Mentoring Coach(416) 649 1658falizadehahi@jvstoronto.org
  37. 37. Jewish Vocational Service Head Office 74 Tycos Drive, Toronto ON 416-787-1151 www.jvstoronto.orgJVS Toronto, a non profit, non-sectarian organization,is a proud member agency of:

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